What’s Happening With Single-Family Rentals?

first_img Related Articles Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago May 16, 2018 2,017 Views  Print This Post David Wharton, Managing Editor at the Five Star Institute, is a graduate of the University of Texas at Arlington, where he received his B.A. in English and minored in Journalism. Wharton has over 16 years’ experience in journalism and previously worked at Thomson Reuters, a multinational mass media and information firm, as Associate Content Editor, focusing on producing media content related to tax and accounting principles and government rules and regulations for accounting professionals. Wharton has an extensive and diversified portfolio of freelance material, with published contributions in both online and print media publications. Wharton and his family currently reside in Arlington, Texas. He can be reached at [email protected] in Daily Dose, Featured, Investment, Journal, News The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago Home / Daily Dose / What’s Happening With Single-Family Rentals? About Author: David Wharton The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago What’s Happening With Single-Family Rentals? Sign up for DS News Daily Subscribecenter_img Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Previous: Michael R. Bright Nominated to Head Ginnie Mae Next: Mulvaney: CFPB to Enforce, ‘Not Become the Law’ Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago CoreLogic rental investments Single Family Rental Single-Family Rental Index 2018-05-16 David Wharton Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Share Save Tagged with: CoreLogic rental investments Single Family Rental Single-Family Rental Index Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Single-family rents have been climbing steadily since 2010, but the latest edition of the CoreLogic Single-Family Rental Index (SFRI) also shows year-over-year (YOY) rent growth also continuing to decelerate in February 2018. That slow deceleration has been the norm since single-family rents peaked at 4.2 percent in February 2016.”Single-family rents continued to increase in February, but the rate of increase slowed from a year ago, particularly for low-end rentals,” said Molly Boesel, Principal Economist for CoreLogic. “The slowdown in growth may signal that rents are beginning to stabilize on the low end.”According to CoreLogic’s SFRI, which “analyzes single-family rent price changes nationally and among 20 metropolitan areas,” national rents increased 2.8 percent in February 2018, compared to an increase of 2.5 percent in February 2017. “Low rental home inventory, relative to demand, fuels the growth of single-family rent prices,” CoreLogic reported.CoreLogic’s SFRI reports that high-end rentals (defined as properties with rent prices greater than 125 percent of a region’s median rent) increased 2.4 percent year-over-year, up from a gain of 1.4 percent in February 2017. On the low-price end of the spectrum (properties with rent prices less than 75 percent of the regional median), rent prices increased by 3.7 percent in February 2018, down from a gain of 4.5 percent in February 2017.Which of the top 20 metros featured the highest year-over-year rent growth for February? That would be Sin City—Las Vegas, Nevada—where single-family rents increased by 5.3 percent YOY. Next in line was Orlando, Florida, which featured a YAY SFR rent growth of 4.8 percent and then Phoenix, Arizona at 4.4 percent.Both Orlando and Phoenix benefited from employment growth during that period as well, featuring growth rates of 3.7 percent and 3.1 percent YOY, respectively. The national employment growth average was 1.4 percent, according to data from the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics.Honolulu, Hawaii, was the only metro to see a YOY decrease in rent prices, dropping by 0.5 percent since February 2017 and continuing a downward trend the metro has experienced for three months straight.CoreLogic also noted rent price increases in the Houston metro, which is still recovering from last year’s damaging hurricane season. Houston experienced 2.7 percent rent growth YOY in February, compared to 1.2 percent in October 2017. The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days agolast_img read more

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Who Should Make the First Move?.

first_imgLifestyleRelationships Who Should Make the First Move?. by: – June 28, 2011 33 Views   no discussions Share Sharing is caring! Sharecenter_img Tweet Share by Rich Santos, Marie ClairePhoto Credit: Neil KirkHe Said…The other day my friend asked me how I’d react if a girl asked me out. I told her I’d be ecstatic, because it would take away all of the work I had to do: the waiting 2.038 days to call her, the wondering, the worrying, figuring out what to say on the phone. But then I took a step back and realized that every girl who has asked me out, I’ve said yes to regardless of whether I was interested or not. I like to give everyone a shot, and I totally respect a girl who finds me attractive enough to ask out. So, yes, guys love it when a girl takes the initiative. But just remember that the same problem exists for you if you ask us out: We might just say yes and unintentionally give you the wrong idea. Bottom line, it is fair game for either gender to make the move, and it’s always good to shake things up! So, go ahead — keep us on our toes.She Said…Anyone should be able to make the first move. There is only one first move that is the grandest of them all — the very first initial interaction that signals interest between couples. That can come with a handshake, a flirty smile, the passing of a business card, or the inquiry for a phone number. A woman might make a perceivably smaller first move than a man might. She’ll engage more in conversation with him but may not ask for the phone number. Her first subtle move, however, signals him to make the bolder second move. That same scenario can work in the reverse way as well. As long as men and women stay within their comfort zones when plotting a first move, there isn’t much chance for it to go wrong. As long as we read the signals correctly, the eventual first move should end up in our favor, no matter who is taking the initial step.last_img read more

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