Waverly School: Earth’s Eye

first_img Make a comment Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  First Heatwave Expected Next Week Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy 8 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it Community News Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Business News Education Waverly School: Earth’s Eye Article and Photo courtesy of THE WAVERLY SCHOOL Published on Wednesday, December 12, 2012 | 11:17 pm “We never know the worth of water till the well is dry.” ~Thomas Fuller, 1732Maybe Eli (dad of Hannah, 1st grade) was thinking along these lines last summer, when he decided to adopt our poor, forlorn, empty farm pond. Eli single-handedly hauled several tons (literally) of rock, concrete and brick out of the pond, removed the old liner, smoothed out the bottom, and added a layer of sand and a new, sturdy liner. Then, we turned the pond over to the Purple Pelicans, who, in light of their “Coastlines and Communities” theme built us a new coastline of cattails, papyrus and water lilies. The pond is back, and already it is a magical and serene spot.“A lake is the landscape’s most beautiful and expressive feature. It is earth’s eye; looking into which the beholder measures the depth of his own nature.” ~Henry David Thoreau (King of the pond, after all)Thank you, Eli, for giving us the benefit of your hard labor. The children are drawn to our pond like a magnet– watching, studying, and wondering. Gazing into earth’s eye. –Barbara Ayers, Farm Manager Subscribecenter_img Community News faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,PCC – EducationVirtual Schools PasadenaDarrell Done EducationHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes More Cool Stuff Top of the News EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday HerbeautyThese Are 15 Great Style Tips From Asian WomenHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty10 Questions To Start Conversation Way Better Than ‘How U Doing?’HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyLove Astrology: 12 Types Of Boyfriends Based On Zodiac SignsHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty8 Easy Exotic Meals Anyone Can MakeHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty5 Things To Avoid If You Want To Have Whiter TeethHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyHe Is Totally In Love With You If He Does These 7 ThingsHerbeautyHerbeauty Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadenalast_img read more

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Knock, a CRM for landlords, raises $20M

first_img Fifth WallMultifamilyProptechstartup Share via Shortlink Knock co-founders Tom Petry and Demetri Themelis (Photos via Knock)Knock, which bills itself as the “front-office tech stack” for apartment landlords, has raised $20 million in growth equity to accelerate the rollout of new products, including virtual touring and leasing.The round, led by Fifth Wall Ventures, brings the startup’s total funding to $47 million. Previous backers Madrona Venture Group, Lead Edge Capital, Second Avenue Partners and Seven Peaks Ventures also participated in the round.Based in Seattle, Knock’s core product is a customer relationship manager (CRM) for multifamily owners. The funding will allow the company to invest in new products, including centralized sales and lease management, virtual tours, applicant screening and AI communications and forecasting. Knock has 100 employees, and plans to add 40 to 50 more this year.It’s not affiliated with another company with the same name, which helps people buy homes; or with Easy Knock, a sale-leaseback company for homeowners.Knock was founded in 2014 by Tom Petry and Demetri Themelis, who previously worked together at UBS Wealth Management in New York City. The idea stemmed from their painful experiences as renters. “Looking under the hood, it was even worse” from a property management perspective, Themelis said, citing a lack of technological innovation.Using Knock’s software, renters can see what’s available and book tours. From there, property managers can use Knock to manage correspondence with prospects and stay on top of calendar items — from showings to renewals.“Every operational touch point is managed within Knock,” Themelis said.Read moreSmartRent rises $60M with multifamily play NestEgg raises $7 million to help landlords get paid Cracks in the multi-family market? In a statement, Fifth Wall partner Vik Chawla said institutional capital is flowing into the multifamily space. “With asset prices increasing in response, operators need to improve yield and maximize operational efficiencies,” he said.Knock is subscription based, and while it declined to disclose revenue, the company said it’s quadrupled its revenue over the past two years. It also experienced a massive uptick last year, when the pandemic pushed landlords to rapidly adopt tech, if they weren’t already.The company has 1.5 million units on its platform. Customers include CAPREIT, the Canadian Apartment Properties REIT; as well as Pinnacle Property Management, which was acquired last year by Cushman & Wakefield; and Highmark Residential, an affiliate of Starwood Capital.“We are selling to owners and operators of large portfolios, who use Knock as a portfolio management solution,” Themelis said.Contact E.B. Solomont Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedinShare via Email Share via Shortlink Tags Message* Email Address* Full Name*last_img read more

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Blood test for prion diseases reported

first_imgAug 29, 2005 (CIDRAP News) – Scientists in Texas report they have found a way to detect abnormal prion protein in blood, an achievement that could lead to the first practical blood test for bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) and similar diseases in living animals. At present, BSE and related prion diseases, called transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs), can be definitively diagnosed only by examination of brain tissue after death. In the United Kingdom, BSE spread through cattle herds in the 1980s and early 1990s and led to more than 150 cases of vCJD in people, presumably as a result of eating beef from infected animals. The United States has had two BSE cases so far. In its current form, PMCA testing takes several days to yield a highly sensitive result, the report says. The authors say they expect to further increase the speed of the test. The method is called protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA). It involves separating the “buffy coat” portion of a blood sample, adding a dose of normal prion protein from brain tissue to it, incubating the preparation at 37˚C, exposing it to sound waves, and repeating the process many times. If abnormal prion protein is present, it causes the normal prions to convert to the abnormal, misfolded form, forming small clumps, the report says. The sonic treatment breaks up the clumps into smaller bits, stimulating further conversion as the cycle is repeated. After a number of rounds of PMCA, the abnormal protein can be detected by an existing test, such as the Western blot. According to an Associated Press report, Soto also said he hopes to evaluate the test in animals that have been naturally infected with a TSE and in animals that have asymptomatic infections. The test was used successfully to detect a prion disease in hamsters. If it proves effective in cattle and humans, it could help protect the blood supply from BSE, help determine the prevalence of the disease in US cattle, and assist researchers trying to assess how many people are unwittingly infected with variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD), the human equivalent of BSE. In a UTMB news release, Soto commented, “The next step, which we’re currently working on, will be detecting prions in the blood of animals before they develop clinical symptoms and applying the technology to human blood samples.” The authors described the basic process in previous reports, and in the new article they write that they found a way to automate the process to speed it up and increase the number of cycles.center_img The researchers predict that the development of a similar blood test for humans will have a “tremendous impact” on the beef industry, the safety of blood and blood products, and estimation of the number of vCJD cases. They suggest that the test could permit the diagnosis and treatment of vCJD early in its course, before the appearance of clinical signs and permanent brain damage. The disease is currently untreatable and always fatal. To evaluate the test, they used 12 healthy hamsters and 18 hamsters that had clinical signs of scrapie (the sheep form of TSE) after being inoculated with infected brain tissue. After six rounds of PMCA, abnormal prion protein was detected in blood samples from 16 of the 18 sick hamsters, but not in any of the samples from healthy hamsters. The findings signify 89% sensitivity and 100% specificity for the test. “Our findings represent the first time that prions have been biochemically detected in blood,” the authors state. Because the test appears to be highly accurate, it “offers promise for the design of a sensitive biochemical test for blood diagnosis of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies.” Castilla J, Saa P, Soto C. Detection of prions in blood. Nature Medicine 2005; early online release [Abstract]http://www.nature.com/nm/journal/v11/n9/abs/nm1286.html The new blood test was developed by Claudio Soto and two colleagues at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston (UTMB). Writing in Nature Medicne, they report that they devised a way to stimulate a tiny, undetectable amount of abnormal prion protein in a blood sample to multiply so that it reaches detectable levels. Because TSEs take years to produce symptoms, it is feared that many more Britons were infected unknowingly and will fall ill in the years ahead. The discovery in Britain of a few possible cases of transmission of vCJD through blood transfusions has fueled more concern.last_img read more

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First human trial of Oxford coronavirus vaccine shows promise

first_imgTopics : The vaccine from AstraZeneca and Britain’s University of Oxford prompted no serious side effects and elicited antibody and T-cell immune responses, according to trial results published in The Lancet medical journal, with the strongest response seen in people who received two doses.British Prime Minister Boris Johnson, whose government has helped fund the project, hailed the results as “very positive news” though the researchers cautioned the project was still at an early stage.”There is still much work to be done before we can confirm if our vaccine will help manage the COVID-19 pandemic,” vaccine developer Sarah Gilbert said. “We still do not know how strong an immune response we need to provoke to effectively protect against SARS-CoV-2 infection.”AstraZeneca shares surged 10%, but then gave up most of those gains, to close up 1.45% on the day. An experimental vaccine being developed by AstraZeneca and Oxford University against the new coronavirus produced an immune response in early-stage clinical trials, data showed on Monday, preserving hopes it could be in use by the end of the year.The vaccine, called AZD1222, has been described by the World Health Organization’s chief scientist as the leading candidate in a global race to halt a pandemic that has killed more than 600,000 people.More than 150 possible vaccines are in various stages of development, and US drugmaker Pfizer and China’s CanSino Biologics also reported positive responses for their candidates on Monday.center_img AstraZeneca has signed agreements with governments around the world to supply the vaccine should it prove effective and gain regulatory approval. It has said it will not seek to profit from the vaccine during the pandemic.AZD1222 was developed by Oxford and licensed to AstraZeneca, which has put it into large-scale, late-stage trials to test its efficacy. It has signed deals to produce and supply over 2 billion doses of the shot, with 300 million doses earmarked for the United States.Pascal Soriot, Chief Executive of AstraZeneca, said the company was on track to be producing doses by September, but that hopes that it will be available this year hinged on how quickly late-stage trials could be completed, given the dwindling prevalence of the virus in Britain.Late-stage trials are under way in Brazil and South Africa and are due to start in the United States, where prevalence is higher.Targeting two dosesThe trial results showed a stronger immune response in 10 people given an extra dose of the vaccine after 28 days, echoing a trial in pigs.Oxford’s Gilbert said the early-stage trial could not determine whether one or two doses would be needed to provide immunity.”It may be that we don’t need two doses, but we want to know what we can achieve,” she told reporters.AstraZeneca’s biopharma chief, Mene Pangalos, said the firm was leaning towards a two-dose strategy for later-stage trials, and did not want to risk a single or lower dose that might not work. The antibody levels generated were “in the region” of those seen in convalescent patients, he said.The trial included 1,077 healthy adults aged 18-55 years with no history of COVID-19. Researchers said the vaccine caused minor side effects more frequently than a control group, but some of these could be reduced by taking the painkiller paracetamol, which is also known as acetaminophen.last_img read more

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Mourinho wants decision from Rooney

first_imgChelsea manager Jose Mourinho has called on Wayne Rooney to state publicly whether he wants to leave Manchester United or not. “He played for his club, played for the club that pays him, tried to win, tried to score. He was fantastic. “After that, if he wants to leave, he has to say – or he decides now that he doesn’t want to leave any more. “But I praise him. He played a fantastic match in these difficult circumstances. “Many players in this situation can’t express themselves on the pitch. They don’t feel enough confidence or they cannot forget what is behind (them).” Specifically on the crowd, Mourinho said: “In other countries it wouldn’t be possible, in other clubs it wouldn’t be possible. “It doesn’t matter the player you are, they don’t want you. “But they gave him fantastic support, it was good, it was nice – very English.” Meanwhile, on other matters, Moyes was unwilling to further discuss United’s attempts to sign Everton pair Leighton Baines and Marouane Fellaini. Moyes’ former club rejected a £28million joint bid for the duo last week and Everton boss Roberto Martinez has since criticised his Goodison Park predecessor. Moyes said: “I never released we had made the first bid and I certainly wouldn’t release it if we made a second bid. “Maybe you should ask Everton, they might tell you that.” Moyes was also cryptic when asked whether United were interested in Tottenham star Gareth Bale. When asked if United had made a bid on Monday, Moyes said: “No. “I have just said Manchester United are always interested in the best players. “The board and myself would always be looking to sign who we think are the best players, whoever they are.” Mourinho also rubbished suggestions he might be prepared to let playmaker Juan Mata leave Stamford Bridge. He said: “He is very important for me and very important for Chelsea. “The stories that are coming out are nonsense stories. He goes nowhere.” Press Association So far there has been no public comment on the matter from Rooney, who impressed against Chelsea in Monday’s goalless Barclays Premier League draw at Old Trafford. Mourinho, speaking in the post-match press conference, said: “I think the person that started the story has to finish the story. “A club like us, a manager like me and the people that work in the club with me, we are not silly to try to get a player from a big club, a club that doesn’t sell what they don’t want to sell. “We are not silly to try to (do) something if somebody didn’t start it. “It is time for the good of everyone to finish the story, to one side or the other side.” When asked how he knew Rooney had been agitating for a move, Mourinho said: “Because I know.” Rooney, 27, received a good reception from the United fans before kick-off and Mourinho suggested he would not be surprised if such support changed the player’s mind. He said: “The most important thing is that he played very well. He was a real professional. The west Londoners have been linked with the unsettled England international throughout the summer transfer window but United have been steadfast in their determination not to sell. Mourinho is still keen on the player but admits it is almost time to bring the saga to a close and wants the player to speak out. last_img read more

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Clairton celebrates back-to-back State championships with day of celebration

first_imgErik Walker said it felt good to be back celebrating the Clairton Bears’ win of the PIAA/WPIAL Championship. “It felt good because we worked hard to get 16-0 this season. After the seniors left last year, people thought we wouldn’t be able to pull this off but we’re here,” said Walker, a defensive end and offensive lineman for the team. “Hopefully we’ll be here next year and do the same thing.”Clairton Bears football players, cheerleaders, proud parents and supporters of the team turned out for a second year in a row to celebrate the team’s subsequent wins of the 2009 and 2010 PIAA and WPIAL championships during a banquet held at the Ascension Hall in Clairton. The team only allowed 34 points all season. Although they were behind by 24 points early in the first quarter of the championship game, the Bears came back and won their 31st straight game and second consecutive Class A title.However, this year was different for the Bears.“They dismantled all of their opponents and I’m proud of the players because they were not fighting,” explained Richard Livingston, president, Clairton City School District Board of Directors. “I’m proud of what the team has done and the character they showed. They are champions in every sense of the word.”Defensive Back Trenton Coles agreed with Livingston.“It was a great season because we didn’t lose a game and we enjoyed being able to play with our teammates,” Coles said.During the banquet, football players, coaches and managers received rings to commemorate their efforts.The rings were presented to the players by Clairton Bears Head Coach, Tom Nola.“These guys are special. Their leadership and stick-to-it-ness is one of the reasons we did so well this season,” Nola said.That’s why Paulette Bradford, vice president of the Clairton City School District and president of the Clairton Athletic Champions Club, and others got together to plan a celebration for the team.The day began with a parade through the streets of Clairton, which ended at the Clairton Educational Center on Waddell Avenue. Inside the school an assembly was held. The whole day culminated with the banquet.“We love the kids and the people in Clairton care about kids. Clairton does not have a lot, but what we have we value and what we have is our children and we’ll do what we have to do to support them,” explained Bradford. Remondo Williams, a member of the Clairton Bears coaching staff felt the day of festivities for the team spoke volumes about the pride the city felt for the team.“The festivities were a testament to the people and how they don’t mind coming out and helping and supporting the kids in Clairton,” Williams said.Defensive Linebacker Donte Thomas enjoyed the banquet and the day of celebration and is confident that his team will be celebrating another successful win next year.“It was nice and I appreciate everyone that came out and celebrated this with us. It was a good experience and I’m looking forward to next season,” Thomas said. 2010 STATE CHAMPION CLAIRTON BEARS (Courier Photos/J.L. Martello)last_img read more

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Jeanne Kelly Joins Heritage House Sotheby in Rumson

first_imgRUMSON – Mary Burke, broker and owner of Heritage House Sotheby’s Inter­national Realty, and Joyce Wopat, broker associate/ branch manager, welcome Jeanne Kelly, sales associate, to the Rumson office.Jeanne KellyA graduate of Fordham University and former fixed income salesperson for Lehman Brothers, New York and London, Kelly brings exceptional communication and negotiation skills to the firm.Before settling in Rumson, Jeanne and her family spent 14 years abroad. Upon her arrival back in the U.S., “settling in Monmouth County, New Jersey’s best kept secret, was an easy one. With its beautiful beaches, wonderful wooded preserves, its close proximity to NYC and having extended family locally made Rumson the perfect choice to live and raise a family.”Embracing her new home, Kelly immersed herself in the community through several local charities such as Prevention First and The Jacqueline Wilentz Breast Center. She is an active volunteer for both Rumson Country Day and Deane Porter School parent teacher organizations and also coaches recreational soccer and basketball. Like her exceptional professional skills, Kelly exemplifies community citizenship.“I joined Heritage House Sotheby’s International Realty knowing the importance of partnering with an established local firm that truly offers global connections through an extraordinary brand like Sotheby’s International Realty.“The Rumson office management and sales associates have proven over and over their high level of service and expertise. I am pleased to be apart of this team of professionals,” Kelly said.Kelly can be reached at Heritage House Sotheby’s International Realty’s Rumson office at 23 West River Road. Whether you are a buyer or seller or just gathering information, Kelly can be reached by phone at 732-232-9378 or via email at [email protected] information about Heritage House Sotheby’s International Realty is available by visiting the website at www.heritagehousesothebysrealty.com.last_img read more

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World’s top snowboarders set to descend on Baldface for second Red Bull Ultra Natural

first_imgRed Bull Ultra Natural is the only event that brings together the most accomplished big-mountain freeriders, who fine-tune jaw-dropping film segments and first descents deep in the backcountry, with the current crop of freestyle riders raising the bar in the park and pipe.With three distinct sections of the course designed to show off each athlete’s strength and individual discipline, the event aims to serve-up a day of snowboard competition beyond anyone’s wildest imagination. The brainchild of Travis Rice, Red Bull Ultra Natural creates the dream snowboard run located within the 32,000 acre tenure of Canada’s premier snowcat operation, Baldface Lodge. On the 45+ degree slope nicknamed “Scary Cherry,” a new wider start area and more line options will create more diversity for the riders in 2013.More than 80 existing features have been refined and additional creative hips and objects have been placed on-course to create transitional riding elements in between the upper tree-line jumps and pillow lines, the middle section’s super-kicker, and the natural jib and jump section near the finish. The single day competition ensures that the event takes place under only the best possible conditions – a mix of deep powder, good sunlight, and safe conditions. Snowboarding legends Jamie Lynn and Peter Line will join Temple Cummins, Andy Hetzel and Head Judge Tom Burt this year as they base scores on an overall impression of the riders’ two runs, with the best run counting towards the win. A shift of almost two weeks later in the season will help ensure that sunlight on the NorthEast slope will last across all 32 runs.Fans in the U.S. can tune-in to NBC on March 30th at 1:30 p.m. ET/10:30 a.m. PT to catch Red Bull Ultra Natural presented by Nike Snowboarding.  The show airs as part of the Red Bull Signature Series, an action sports property featuring some of Red Bull’s top events including Dreamline, Wake Open and Rampage. The Red Bull Signature Series is the most progressive and innovative action sports property in the world, featuring surfing, snowboarding, mountain biking, skiing, BMX, wakeboarding and motorsports events. For more information, please visit www.redbullsignatureseries.com. To watch the event trailer and learn more about Red Bull Ultra Natural, please visit www.redbull.com/ultranatural. Last year Travis Rice used home course advantage to capture the Red Bull Ultra Natural.No wonder, he designed the course.Later this month — February 15-21 — Rice is inviting eight new riders to the challenge of an updated course design to crown the world’s best all-around snowboarder at Nelson’s Baldface Lodge.“This event was created as the highest echelon of competitive snowboarding. It draws on all aspects and a lifetime of accumulated snowboarding skill and knowledge,” said event creator and pro snowboarder Travis Rice.“Entering into its second year at Baldface Lodge, Red Bull Ultra Natural will provide an even further evolved platform for the heaviest continuous lines ever ridden. Now that riders have an idea of what to expect, there is no doubt the governor is coming off.”Rice is joined by 15 of the world’s top riders.last_img read more

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This Bacterium Moves Like a Tank

first_imgMark McBride (U of Wisconsin) has been trying for a decade to figure out how a gliding bacterium glides.  His conclusion: the microbe has tire treads like a conveyor belt that make it roll over a variety of surfaces, like an all-terrain vehicle.    According to a U of Wisconsin press release, the Department of Energy (DOE) is interested in this bacterium, Cytophaga hutchinsonii, because it can digest paper and other forest by-products.  This is the first step in converting biomaterial into ethanol, to use as fuel.    Of the cell’s “parts list,” McBride identified 24 genes involved in its gliding motility.  He attached tiny latex spheres to the cell surface and then watched them move in all directions.  “The cell wall appears to have a series of moving conveyer belts,” he said.  He described these nearly invisible filaments as like tire treads, “designed to help the organism move over a variety of surfaces, like an all-terrain vehicle.”  He believes these structures also convey cellulose into the interior of the cell, toward specialized organelles that digest it.    Figuring out how this cell digests cellulose is still a work in progress.  Unlike other bacteria that know the trick, this one “may use either a novel strategy or novel enzymes.”  The Department of Energy is interested in this research.  It may help our energy-hungry civilization “find other renewable materials that will be cost-effective alternatives, such as paper pulp, sawdust, straw and grain hulls.”    What really intrigues McBride about his research on C. hutchinsonii, though, is what makes it go.  He and his students have been comparing it with another gliding bug, Flavobacterium johnsoniae, that although “not closely related,” may “use the same basic machinery to move.”  How different are these two?  McBride claimed, “You are more closely related to a fruit fly than these two organisms are to each other.”Question: how much did evolutionary theory contribute to this decade-long science project?  Apparently, none.  The press release said nothing about evolution, but quoted the professor using a forbidden word to describe the structures he found: “They are designed to help the organism move over a variety of surfaces, like an all-terrain vehicle.”  Have you ever seen an ATV that emerged by evolution?  How about two that arrived at the same engineering solution independently, with nothing but mutations for information input?    A mousetrap only takes 5 parts to be considered irreducibly complex; here is one system in one cell that requires 24 parts.  When any one of them was missing, the bacterium was stuck at a standstill.  From one of his comments, McBride apparently believes in evolution, but his research method assumes intelligent design and proceeds without Charlie’s superfluous counsel.  As a benefit of this team’s persistent efforts for more than ten years to understand how these microscopic ATVs work, we may some day be able to fill our car gas tanks with the output of microbial tanks.    Could we see the world at the bacterial level, we would be astonished at the engineering.  Animators could have fun depicting these microscopic tanks appearing over the horizon, consuming all the cellulose in their path.  What kind of sound track would go with such a scene?  Imagine the crescendo to a climax when each machine divides into two working copies.  Let’s see military engineers try to duplicate that feat with just wood chips for fuel.(Visited 9 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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Business looks to eco ‘standards’

first_img17 September 2003The director of the World Conservation Union (IUCN), Akim Steiner, says the business sector has expressed willingness to contribute towards conservation as part of their social responsibilities towards sustainable development.Speaking to BuaNews at the fifth World Parks Congress in Durban, Steiner said some business sector delegates were working with conservationists to develop “standards” to respond to nature conservation.“The business community is saying they would like to work on the basis that they work on national laws as they define their ability to work, and increasingly they have seen that unless they can also deal with conservation as a corporate responsibility issue, they will lose public support”, Steiner said.“Therefore they are trying to engage with environmental organisations and conservation communities to actually develop some standards to respond to public criticism.”Steiner’s comments came amid a debate at the congress that brought together representatives of the private sector, conservation community and indigenous peoples concerning the role business can play regarding protected areas.He said some IUCN members, such as Friends of the Earth, were challenging companies that still refused to recognise conservation as part of their corporate responsibilities.However, energy company Shell has been hailed as a good example in this regard. Earlier this month, the company announced that World Heritage Sites would in future be regarded as “no go” areas for its oil and gas exploration programmes.The declaration, the first of its kind by a major energy company, is expected to have a ripple effect internationally.Shell chairperson and CEO Philip Watts presented initiatives that would incorporate biodiversity management into the company’s business processes in Switzerland.Adrian Loader, Shell’s director for strategic planning for sustainable development and external affairs, said the company was still committed to reducing greenhouse gases and looking to develop environmentally friendly energy sources.“We believe we have an immediate responsibility to contribute towards our activities to help to solve the problem of reducing green house gases”, Loader said.He said this century was seen as a period to phase out hydrocarbons, although not completely. “Exactly how and when, I can’t tell you at this point in time, but we have a responsibility to provide cleaner fuels with existing hydrocarbons”, Loader said.Source: BuaNewslast_img read more

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