Ireland turn on the style

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Big hit: Ireland wing Tommy Bowe feels the force of a Graeme Morrison tackle in DublinBy Claire GlancyIT WAS always going to be interesting to see how Ireland would respond to last week’s draw with France: would they be able to build on their first-half performance in Paris? Or would surrendering the lead and failing to get on the scoreboard after the break leave them with a hangover?Scotland have found themselves battling with Italy for the wooden spoon in recent years, but their results do not reflect how threatening they can be or how close they often come to pulling off a tournament-altering win (in 2010 they spoiled Ireland’s hopes of leaving Croke Park with a Triple Crown). Last year, the Ireland players were subjected to abuse from their own fans after an ‘ugly’ three-point win at Murrayfield, which shows how much expectation has grown among the nation’s rugby supporters.Thankfully this time around, Ireland produced a performance that was at times a delight to watch. Not just for the result – a 32-14 win – but the way they committed to playing fast, attacking, ‘eyes-up’ rugby. They ran from their own line, they moved the ball into space quickly, they kicked in order to attack and they played with real speed.Green giant: Stephen Ferris tests Scotland’s defenceThe stats imply that Ireland didn’t play as well as they have in the past, but it just goes to show that stats do lie. They missed more tackles, they had less possession – but they ran out comfortable winners. Scoring four tries in international rugby is no mean feat, but with better execution and some more effective decision-making they could have scored more. Quick tap penalties got Ireland on the front foot and although those of us watching couldn’t understand why Ireland weren’t kicking the points when they were on offer, it was good to see a side willing to have a go. Even better, was to see that risk-taking pay off. Much of Wales’ and England’s success in this championship has been laid at the feet of their carefree and exciting young players, those playing without fear. It almost seemed as if Ireland’s experience was the thing holding them back, but if against Italy the shackles started to loosen, then yesterday they came off. Rob Kearney and Stephen Ferris have impressed throughout the tournament (on Saturday the latter produced another physical masterclass) but all involved should be pleased with their efforts.Scotland are a fit team, but when Ireland injected pace, the Scottish defence were made to work harder and as a result had to execute skills when fatigued. This led to a high error count by the Scots but credit has to go to the Irish defence for putting them under such pressure and the Irish attack for pushing them more than they have done before.center_img Man of the Match: Donnacha Ryan The Scots have the strongest lineout in the competition and hadn’t lost a single one before coming up against Ireland. For the hosts, it is definitely still a work in progress but after misfiring early on, Ireland began to look much sharper than they had done in previous weeks. They won five and lost two but the process seemed quicker and the Irish cut numbers more often. Donnacha Ryan proved himself a fitting replacement for Paul O’Connell and O’Connell’s injury is perhaps the only thing saving Donncha O’Callaghan from a seat on the bench.For the final match discipline will have to improve, especially given the reliability of Owen Farrell’s kicking. Ireland’s recent record against England is impressive but Stuart Lancaster’s reign has brought a new spirit and enthusiasm into the side. Having won three away games this year, Lancaster will be hoping he’s done enough to make his role a permanent one and victory over Ireland would almost certainly seal the deal. The Irish travel to Twickenham with nothing to play for but pride on St Patrick’s Day – but pride is all the motivation Ireland need when it’s England who lie in wait.last_img read more

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Silly season: Six spring signings

first_imgRough riding: Alby Mathewson, demonstrating the all-action style that may make him a success in Australia Racing away? Jamie Roberts is offJamie RobertsIt is proving a fantastic time for that behemoth of the Top 14 ‘Undisclosed French club’.The mysterious Gallic outfit have pulled off coup after coup so far, with French regulations ensuring that no club can officially sign a player before April. So we know for a fact that Jamie Roberts will leave Cardiff Blues and we know he is off to France, but we do not know precisely where he is going, despite it being strongly alleged that Racing Metro will be his new employers.Vive le jaw.Dan LydiateThat pesky undisclosed French club is at it again. Not happy with just wrapping up Roberts, they felt is necessary to secure the signature of a certain Welsh flanker, who specialises in chopping down those with the temerity to attack his defensive channel.Lydiate is also rumoured to be off to Racing alongside his compatriot. The exodus from Wales continues and it is almost certain that Toby Faletau will be receiving an abnormally large amount of phone calls in the coming months.Code breaker: ‘Big’ Izzy FolauIsrael FolauNow moving onto his third code, the 23 year-old league/Aussie rules convert has signed up with Michael Cheika at the NSW Waratahs. It is hoped his quicksilver finishing will attract more transient fans in Sydney. What is not quite sure is whether he will be a successful addition for a franchise trying desperately to recapture former glories. A gamble, but an exciting one at that. Alby MathewsonComing from behind a bush in leftfield is Alby Mathewson, the All Black scrum-half. He has just signed for Western Force, hopping across the Tasman to try and make it big in Australia.In an undoubtedly lucrative move, Mathewson is now the marquee man in Perth, hoping to overcome the team’s recent troubles and instill some form of stability. Expect action, even if that means the Kiwi tries to do it all himself in an attempt to drag his team with him. Making a break for it: Billy Vunipola is running away from London Wasps and joining SaracensBy Alan DymockNO DOUBT the hope was, during the moments where we all jumped up and shouted about the harsh brilliance of the Heineken Cup and the layout of the Six Nations squads, that a few signings could be squeezed in without us noticing.Grass is greener: Habana is France-boundSocial networks never sleep, though. They never cease buzzing, despite how far down a press release a player’s name is shoved, or how obscure a source is. That mill, where rumours are ground out, spins at a furious rate as French millionaires flex their muscles and English sides hunt for their next marquee signing.So far this season it has been revealed that big players are on the move. Below are some of those characters set to sport new colours in the near future.Billy VunipolaIt is safe to say that young Billy’s decision to jump ship has not gone down too well with his former chums at London Wasps.Yesterday an eleventh hour announcement came from Saracens, stating that the battering ram of a No8 was ready to join brother Mako in the black and red of the Allianz outfit.  Last night and today can rightly be called a day of unbridled backlash.His talent is there for all to see. However, how to manage that talent is already proving tough to figure out. Bryan HabanaThe South African winger is a weapon. He is used to success. He is meant for the finer things in life.So perhaps the Stormer was meant to sign for Toulon. It was recently announced in South Africa that the country’s record try scorer was headed for the south of France, adding danger to Toulon’s already terrifying arsenal. Mind you, with stories circulating that World Cup winner Jonny Wilkinson is set to call time on his career, it makes total, sane sense that another superstar World Cup winner is jetted in, just in case. Scary… LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

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Clubhouse Podcast: Travelling trophies, medieval training and singing stars

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS The latest Clubhouse Podcast is here and it is rammed full of incidents and opinions after round two of the Six Nations. Editor Owain Jones is away so we replaced him with Adam Hathaway, rugby correspondent for The People.On the agenda is time-keeping, tries given (and not given), and attacking endeavour from the Scotland versus Wales game. We talk through players running into each other and the lovely kicking out of hand by Johnny Sexton in Ireland‘s win over France. And then we look at England defeating Italy.On that we discuss which changes could be made in the back division, the preparation for the big clash with Ireland in the next round and whether youth should be encouraged to train with the squad.We also have an England international singing… Then we look at the Women’s Six Nations and whether anyone can challenge France, whether Wales can keep winning and why England aren’t quite clicking yet. We also look at the results from the U20 Six Nations.center_img We hope you enjoy listening to our nonsense!The March 2015 issue of Rugby World is packed with Six Nations features. Find out how to download it here and for the latest subscription offers click here.last_img read more

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Experience the exceptional

first_imgHead to Singapore for the HSBC World Rugby Sevens Series 2018 and you’ll find more than rugby to entertain you – there’s something for everyone Advertising FeatureSingapore is the perfect place for rugby fans from all over the world to ‘try’ this spring. It has already run two marvellous editions of the HSBC Singapore Rugby Sevens, as well as played host to Sunwolves’ Super Rugby games and the Italy-Scotland Test earlier this year.The Singapore Sevens is being played on 28-29 April at the 55,000-capacity National Stadium, which has the world’s largest retractable dome and air-cooled seats. Adult, family and youth tickets are reasonably priced and easier to get hold of than for other HSBC World Rugby Sevens Series events in the Asia-Pacific.While the rugby may bring you to Singapore – fast, furious and frenetic games are guaranteed and you’ll see 45 matches over two days – there’s so much else on offer that you’ll want to stay for a little longer to immerse yourself in this amazing island.Sheer joy: A young fan shows her delight at the Singapore Sevens. Photo: Singapore Tourism BoardSingapore is much more than the sum of its numerous attractions, it’s where people come to realise their passions for top-class sporting action, mouth-watering cuisine, amazing retail experiences, a quiet walk in the woods, zinging club life or charming family days out. And it is all just minutes away in The Lion City, with its affordable and well-designed public transport system.On top of epic rugby, expect guaranteed fun and music at the Singapore Sevens, as well as experiences to suit every budget.GREEN LIGHTThe concrete buildings that once dominated Singapore are gradually giving way to green skyscrapers, which look more like living ecosystems than business hubs. Fervently working towards its ‘City in a Garden’ dream, Singapore is fast becoming more sustainable and greener.You’ll find plenty of nature reserves, walking trails, treetop bridges and wildlife galore. Go on a wildlife adventure at the award-winning Singapore Zoo, meet the manatees at the River Safari or head out on an evening prowl with the Night Safari.Green thinking: The Supertree Grove at Gardens by the Bay. Photo: Singapore Tourism BoardBesides the UNESCO World Heritage-listed Singapore Botanic Gardens, there is the spectacular Gardens by the Bay. Located on the shores of Marina Bay, it boasts imposing Supertrees, two gigantic biodomes – Cloud Forest and Flower Dome – that host horticultural exhibitions throughout the year. All just minutes from the CBD. FOOD FOR THOUGHTFood is taken very seriously in Singapore. The cheapest Michelin-starred meal in the world can be found at Liao Fan Hong Kong Soya Sauce Chicken Rice and Noodle at Blk 335, Smith Street. Locals follow their noses, food blogs or just join the longest queue – what lies at the end of the line is guaranteed to be scrumptious. This is a foodie pilgrimage not to be missed.Fayre ground: Diners in Chinatown Food Street. Photo: Singapore Tourism BoardOnce dinner’s done, you could chill out or dance the night away at bars, clubs, beach parties, outdoor concerts and music festivals most weekends. Or enjoy a night of side-splitting laughs at stand-up comedy hangouts.RETAIL THERAPYSitting on the equator, some days can get hot and when it really swelters Singaporeans love ducking indoors for a spot of retail therapy and a blast of air-conditioning. Shopping districts like Orchard Road boast all the high-street brands, haute couture and discount outlets all in one, walkable location.Colourful: The shops on Haji Lane. Photo: Singapore Tourism BoardYou can also head out to precincts dedicated to independent designers, quirky art galleries and bustling markets. You’ll find Persian rugs in Arab Street, traditional remedies in Chinatown or just sheer energy and colour in Little India – Singapore’s slice of the subcontinent.CHILD’S PLAYIt’s not just for adults, Singapore has plenty for youngsters too – four splendid wildlife parks run by Wildlife Reserves Singapore, the Universal Studios Singapore theme park, the SEA Aquarium and Sentosa, an island described as ‘The State of Fun’. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img Fans-tastic: Supporters enjoy the atmosphere at last year’s Singapore Sevens. Photo: Singapore Tourism Board Evening adventure: A family enjoy the Night Safari. Photo: Singapore Tourism BoardThe Singapore Sevens has some great family packages on offer, where two under-18s can attend for a few dollars more on top of their parents’ tickets.So if you want to experience the exceptional at the HSBC Singapore Sevens in April, visit singapore7s.sg for more information and to book tickets.last_img read more

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Rugby Pre-Season Guide: Part One

first_imgThe backs will work on basic running patterns, passing and kicking skills, in line with the coach’s vision for the team. The pack can work on their lineout. This will be the basics of lifting and jumping in the lineout at first. This means trying lifting pods and working on the throw.This can progress to setting out different-coloured cones so that you work on getting the lifters and jumpers to move. At the end you can turn it into a competition with pods jumping against each other, adding an element of fun.The sting in the tail of Tuesday’s session comes from Navidi. “We do aerobic interval running. It’s very simple – 15 seconds running, 15 seconds off. It’s about how far you can go. You can tailor it. If you start on the try-line, our back-rowers normally hit the far 22. So get everyone on the line and put a cone down as a target for each position, one for front-rows, one for the locks etc.”He suggests doing a set of five runs, rest, then go back for a final set of five.On the Thursday session Navidi wants a similar set-up but with more intensity. However, the skills you concentrate 
on must change to keep it fresh. For example, your touch games can reflect a skill you want to focus on, like a touched player hitting the ground and working on ball-presentation skills. Or introduce pared-down defensive drills, purely looking at a chain of players rushing up and communicating.At the end of Thursday’s session, 
do away with the runs and work in an old-school circuit. No equipment is really needed. Partner up. Aim for a work:rest ratio of one:one, doing 30 seconds of an exercise and having 30 seconds off for your partner to do the exercise before quickly moving to the next exercise. Or do this for 15 seconds each and complete the circuit twice. Navidi would have players wrestling, doing short sprint shuttles, wheelbarrows and burpees, and then jumping laterally over a hurdle, cone or pitch marking.Lineout time: Auckland Blues during pre-seasonIn week two, on the field there is a similar feel. But Navidi wants a slight increase in time spent on games. It ramps up again in week three, with more time spent on games and added 
reps for fitness.In the gym, true beginners should stick with the plan (P49). For more advanced lifters, increase weight and drop some reps to develop strength. Then shift the focus on day one and two to how quickly you move moderate weight (70-80% of your top weight) for power.Navidi has a plan to take you towards the break with a clearer team identity.“When you have forwards and backs split, you should use the lineout calls 
as well as backs moves,” he says. “Try 
it at the start of the session. It’s low in intensity. Do it for 20 minutes, then come together for team structure. Then go into blocks of games and running, come back, do it again. Repeat this as often as your coach feels necessary, depending on how fit you want to get.“Thursday of week three you want more intensity. Do what you worked on on Tuesday but as a team. Run to different areas of the field, building in ‘lineout here’. Do up to five phases, then go ‘scrum here’.“You are going for fatigue then into games, then back into rugby. 
Finish with sprints from the halfway. Look for speed and power, not fitness.”Oh, and about Saturdays… Rugby Pre-Season Guide: Part OneW HEN ASKED to concoct the dream pre-season for a fictional amateur side, Cardiff Blues and Wales flanker Josh Navidi laughs. “The dream pre-season is no pre-season!” he says.We know what he means. Anyone who has dragged their backside through a summer regime is familiar with the low-level dread you feel before heading out on the field; it’s more vampire bats than butterflies flapping around in your stomach.However, having asked around we concluded that Old Tatooineans – our fictional side – would best benefit from a pre-season split into two blocks of three weeks of graft, before any friendly matches are played, with a week off between the two blocks.There is running, you can’t escape that. Contact on the hard ground is 
in there too. But we’ve done our best to mix things up, offering variety and reasoning. Over the following pages, we have the outline of a basic weights programme, an idiot’s guide to eating while you train, plus tips from the pros and two brutal session plans you take to your club. Enjoy!Lifting standards: Our co-author, Josh Navidi of Cardiff Blues and WalesBlock One“With the Cardiff Blues, we normally have the first two weeks doing weights and a bit of skills,” says Navidi, now 
Old Tatooineans’ head of strength 
and conditioning. “Then you build up 
to more rugby specifics. Normally we don’t go straight in and do rugby.“So if we build gradually it’ll be fine…”What this means is that our team will take part in two blocks of training, with the first one focusing on conditioning and skills, with a little bit of team shape. Block two introduces a lot more rugby.With block one, ‘gradual’ means starting in one place: the bear pit of the gym. We expect our players to hit the gym a minimum of two times a week, but we would hope it’s three times – see our basic plans top right. We’d also love our team to train on Tuesday and Thursday nights, with on-field work as a squad on a Saturday morning (more on that on pages 51 and 52).Navidi – a qualified personal trainer, as well as an all-action back-rower – wrote our gym plan. We’ve approached this as if you have very little experience in the gym – we want you to build a base, so for a few months at least, it’ll be tough. We want you to put on some muscle.On the field, during the first few weeks of pre-season, you only have a short period of time with the team. “I’m massive on having anaerobic games, simple touch games,” Navidi says of 
his ideal session.“We do a three-minute block, then we’ll 
go into rugby or a specific skills session that’s still quite high in intensity. When I’ve tried it with young players, the standard drops after two minutes. You want to keep the intensity. So do two minutes at first.”Wrestlers: Leinster go at each other in trainingWe can’t tell you what to do for every minute of your sessions – coaches have to be flexible and clear on their plan. However, Old Tatooineans get a mix in the opening fortnight. The basic outline of our Tuesday training is touch games, split up with basic skills work for backs and forwards. Coaches will decide how often you shuttle between them, depending how fit they want you and the time they want to dedicate to skills.In terms of the Tuesday touch games, play different formats for two minutes 
at a time – 
offside touch (pass backwards after first touch, then you can pass forward) or Fijian touch (if touched once, offload; touched twice, put the ball through your legs).Between these games you can throw in basic skills. With players relatively new to rugby, you might implement static passing, then progress to passing along a line, jogging in fours. This is when we will split, forwards and backs. Rugby World enlists some fitness-focused stars – including co-author Josh Navidi – to get you in top shape for the new season LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS For part two of our pre-season guide click here.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.last_img read more

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Jade Konkel’s remarkable rugby journey

first_imgI do 13 training sessions a week. That’s not including analysis and recovery. At Quins we have gym and training on Tuesdays and Thursdays, as well as a skills and speed session on Wednesdays. I’ll also do lots of extras on my own.I have a whole new respect for front-rows. Last year I started two Tests at loosehead – Shade Munro wanted to get his 15 best players on the pitch. I tried it but I’m much more comfortable at No 8.I remember a scrum against Wales and trying to get round the corner ready for a ball-carry and my legs were so heavy. I wasn’t used to that pain. Front-rowers need a different energy system.Skills work: Jade Konkel during Harlequins training (Getty Images)I’m now a vegan. I’d read up on the health benefits and thought I’d see if I could do it. I’ve actually found it easy and feel a lot better.I feel fitter and more healthy. I macro count everything I eat and I know how many grams of carbs, how much protein and so on I’ve eaten each day. I’ve lost quite a bit of weight but I’ve maintained muscle and lost fat, so hopefully I’ll be a more agile No 8 but have the same power and momentum.I’ve got tattoos on both my arms, my ribs, just above my bum, my feet… They’re all specific and a guy in Edinburgh does them. There’s one of me and my sister at my brother’s wedding; a picture of me after my first win in a Scotland shirt; my two favourite places – for a rugby pitch, singing the national anthem and then a view of trees and mountains because I grew up in the countryside… I also have the words: ‘Don’t dream your life, live your dream’.I write ETT – Empty The Tank – on tape on my wrists before every game. I’ll also write buzzwords like ‘low’ or ‘hunt’ and if I’m not happy with my performance at half-time I might just write ‘5%’ to encourage me to step it up. You’ve always got an extra 5%, you go to a dark place and keep going. I’ve got different-coloured Sharpies, so I’ll use blue if I’m playing for Scotland.I listen to motivational quotes or look at them on my phone too.I’m a black belt in Goshin-Ryu Kempo. It’s a self-defence martial art. I also used to play basketball for Highland Bears in the national league. I enjoyed it but I like the physicality of rugby, as well as everything in the game having a purpose and knowing you have your team-mates’ backs and they have yours. It’s a good feeling.I’ve just finished my personal training qualifications. I’m also doing some other courses and after rugby I would like to set up something in deprived areas to encourage people to get active and be healthy. TAGS: Harlequins LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Harlequins and Scotland No 8 Jade Konkel talks long drives, going vegan and meaningful tattoos Front foot: Jade Konkel helped Harlequins to the Tyrrells Premier 15s final (Getty Images) Jade Konkel’s remarkable rugby journeyThere were few opportunities for Jade Konkel to play rugby growing up, but since focusing on the sport aged 17 she has excelled, becoming Scotland’s first female professional player and a key figure for the national side as well as Harlequins.Here she talks through her remarkable rugby journey…I used to drive three-and-a-half hours each way to play. There wasn’t much girls’ rugby around the Black Isle, but at 17 I drove to Edinburgh for a development day and got selected for Scotland U20.After that, every week I drove along the A9 to Glasgow to play for Hillhead-Jordanhill. Sometimes I’d leave at 5am and then find the game had been cancelled, and I’d be sore getting in the car after a match, but I knew I needed to play.I wanted to put everything into rugby. So after three years at uni in Glasgow studying social care, I concentrated on rugby for a year.I got a Stage Two contract from Scottish Rugby, which was unpaid but gave me help with S&C. When they offered me a Stage Three contract, which is paid, I burst out crying! It was nice to see it pay off.On the ball: Jade Konkel in action against Wales during the Women’s Six Nations (Inpho)I was the first woman to get a contract but I’m not the last. It was the same playing with Lille in France last season. Scottish Rugby have created a partnership with them and more girls are doing it.There are now eight players on contracts, we have a women’s sponsor, a great coaching set-up, our matches are on BBC ALBA – it’s all really positive for Scotland.The 2021 World Cup is what we’re aiming for. I’ve played Test rugby since 2013 and missed two World Cups, so we have to get to this next one. We have a core group who can be together for the long run and are improving every year.I was such a home bird, I never thought I’d move away. Instead, I’ve lived in Glasgow for five years, France for a year and now the South of England. Karen Findlay’s been trying to get me to come to Harlequins for a couple of years. I wanted to get the experience in France first and then come here.The physicality in Premier 15s is up there with France. Here there is probably more structure, but the two leagues are quite similar. This article originally appeared in the February 2019 edition of Rugby World.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.last_img read more

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Meet rugby referee Matthew Carley

first_imgMatthew Carley is an English referee who first officiated a professional league game in 2013 in the English Premiership, since progressing to become a trusted World Rugby official. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS The Englishman officiated the opening round of the 2021 Six Nations championship fixture between Italy and France. His first Six Nations bow as referee was in the same fixture in 2019. In 2020’s competition, he also refereed two fixtures.Carley will also take charge of Scotland v Wales in the second round of Six Nations fixtures on Saturday 13 February. After this, he isn’t due to take charge of any more Six Nations fixtures in 2021 as the referee. However, he will still feature as assistant referee later in the tournament when France welcome both Scotland and Wales to the Stade de France. Also make sure you know about the Fixtures, Injuries, Table, Venues, TV Coverage by clicking on the highlighted links.Finally, don’t forget to follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram Man in Charge: Matthew Carley will referee Scotland v Wales at Murrayfield (Getty Images) Matthew Carley is still relatively young for a referee at 36, but is gaining an increasing amount of experience with each passing year. Carley has been an active official in the Six Nations since 2017, before making the step up to become the one in the middle, as referee.Matthew Carley made his professional refereeing debut in 2013 in the English Premiership and has steadily progressed since then. His first European match was in 2015 between Munster and Benetton. This was quickly followed by World Rugby appointing him for his first international fixture, between Russia and USA.Related: 2021 Six Nations refereesCarley’s first Tier One match that he refereed was in 2017, between Scotland and New Zealand. Follow our Six Nations homepage which we update regularly with news and features.last_img read more

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Championship team-by-team guide

first_imgThe Greene King IPA Championship – English rugby’s second tier – kicks off this weekend after the longest pre-season ever. RW looks at how each club is shaping up Ealing are celebrating their 150th season. Anniversary plans have been shattered by the pandemic but that will all be forgotten if they can go one better than the runners-up spot they attained in 2019-20.An impressive cast list features new signings such as Guy Thompson (Leicester), Charlie Walker (Zebre), Max Bodilly (Exeter) and Levi Davis (Bath). Bobby de Wee, a South African lock who nearly had his leg amputated at 14 because of a bacterial infection, is another welcome arrival. Matt Cornish and captain Sam Dickinson are the principal losses.The Trailfinders have been busier than anyone in the division, playing nine friendlies and winning eight of them. And they have faced some serious outfits: Saracens, Newcastle, Bristol Bears A and Doncaster (twice each), along with Richmond at the end of February, when Trailfinders fielded ten academy players.The wins over title rivals Saracens, by 27-26 and 39-26, were particularly satisfying, hooker Alun Walker’s two second-half tries proving critical in the first of those meetings. No one is kidding themselves – Saracens could wheel out a clutch of world-class players if needs be – but DoR Ben Ward says: “We are narrowing the gap.”Trophy hunters: Ealing celebrate winning the Trailfinders Challenge Cup in pre-season (Getty Images)HARTPURY COLLEGELast season: 11thVying with Richmond for the league’s lowest payroll, amateurs Hartpury are more resistant to the financial perils of Covid. They’ve finished near the bottom in their three previous Championship campaigns but think this is their strongest squad to date.Key signings include tighthead Shaun Knight – replacing Coventry-bound Alex Gibson – and ten/12 James Williams, who returns after spells at Moseley and Sale. Hooker Nick Selway has joined on a short-term contract from London Scottish while lock Ehize Ehizode, recruited from Chinnor, stood out with some strong carries during a recent 10-7 loss to a Gloucester XV. Hartpury also have a batch of Gloucester Academy players available.Ryan Lamb has replaced Jon Goodridge as backs coach and is registered to play. And Rhys Oakley, who captained the Hartpury side that won all 30 National One fixtures on its way to promotion to the Championship in 2017, is the defence coach. Oakley, a former Wales back-row, has fought back from testicular cancer.Hartpury’s fingerprints are all over the pro game; five of England’s initial Six Nations squad – Harry Randall, Jonny Hill, Jonny May, Dan Robson and Ellis Genge – are Hartpury alumni. And another is Wales cap Louis Reez-Zammit. He’s not doing badly either, eh?College of knowledge: much-travelled fly-half Ryan Lamb is relishing coaching at Hartpury (Getty)JERSEY REDSLast season: 7thJersey have a proud record as a ‘finishing school’, with Wales trio Will Rowlands, Callum Sheedy and Kieran Hardy the latest internationals to have honed their skills on the island.Last year produced Reds’ first lower-half finish in several years but the arrival of the likes of Macauley Cook (Cardiff Blues), Namibia cap Lesley Klim (Ospreys) and Sean O’Connor (Munster) provide grounds for optimism. O’Connor captained the Reds in friendly defeats to Coventry (34-33) and Pirates (26-13) when DoR Harvey Biljon named the same starting XVs.Other more recent signings are back-row Tim Grey, Fiji-born No 9 Cameron Nordli-Kelemeti and fly-half Bader Pretorius, the latter from Southern Kings.Off the field, Rob Webber, who made a brief playing return for Sale last year, finally rolls his sleeves up as forwards coach. And there are plaudits for assistant coach Ed Robinson, who is spending the Six Nations on secondment to England.Related content: Ed Robinson joins England coaching staffJersey have a bye this weekend and then play Saracens in the first of five successive away games; they switched the match against Richmond on 20 March to the opposition’s ground. The unusual start allows the Reds to participate in the league while they continue to work out travel arrangements for visiting clubs.New Red: Namibia wing Lesley Klim catches the ball against New Zealand at RWC 2019 (AFP/ Getty)NOTTINGHAMLast season: 6thReality bites at Nottingham, where budgetary constraints have forced the club to go part-time. They will be training two evenings a week during the season, with S&C fitted around players’ jobs. “It’s a short-term solution,” says CEO Steve Smith. “Then we need to review what we want as a model going forward.”The squad has been assembled later than others. It includes four players on loan from Leicester, including 18-year-old Emeka Ilione, well known locally for his time with Nottingham Corsairs. Lock Luke Frost joins from London Scottish while eight players arrive on dual registration – Scarlets and Sale provide three apiece.Flanker Josh Buggea, recruited from Bedford, has opted to join the police instead. Alex White (skills) joins a coaching group now shorn of Andi Kyriacou (defence and forwards). It’s set to be a tough campaign for the men of Notts.FIRST-ROUND FIXTURESSat 6 MarchHartpury College v Richmond (1.15pm)Cornish Pirates v Saracens (3pm)Coventry v Bedford Blues (3pm)Sun 7 MarchAmpthill v Doncaster (1pm)Nottingham v Ealing Trailfinders (1pm)Bye: Jersey RedsRICHMONDLast season: 1st (National One)Richmond have trimmed the squad that bounced straight back up last season as National One champions – they were seven points clear of Rosslyn Park with five rounds remaining when things came to a halt because of Covid.Coventry, London Scottish, Chinnor and Old Elthamians have each provided multiple recruits to Richmond, who gave game time to 33 players during their pre-season match with Ealing. Wing Alex Doble (Old Elthamians) bagged a couple of tries in that 33-24 defeat.Prop Jonny Harris (London Scottish) and wings Chris Elder (Chinnor) are significant arrivals while wily veteran Jamie Gibbs has retired and will be much missed at scrum-half. George Trimmer (skills) and Nic Rouse (forwards) supplement the coaching team.Director of Rugby Steve Hill announced his squad after “34 weeks of unpaid pre-season training” and Saturday’s match with Hartpury will be a year to the day since Richmond played a competitive match.Famous venue: Richmond Athletic Ground, the home of Richmond since 1889 (CameraSport/Getty Images)SARACENSLast season: 12th (Premiership)Demoted Saracens get to eat humble pie, their first-team talent spread far and wide – on loan or gone for good – as the three-time European champions adjust to what most people assume will be a single season in the second tier.Academy graduates like Manu Vunipola and Joel Kpoku will take up the slack, and among several new faces are a number with Championship experience, such as Alex Carey and Jaco Venter (Jersey), Harry Sloan (Ealing) and Will Hooley (Bedford).A glance at the try-scorers in their final pre-season match tells you plenty about the task facing their league rivals: Alex Lewington (three), Juan Pablo Socino, Tim Swinson, Vincent Koch and Tom Whiteley all crossed at Coventry, while Manu Vunipola kicked 12 points.With Alex Sanderson having joined Sale, skills coach Joe Shaw is the new head coach and Adam Powell moves up from the academy to run defence. Kelly Brown, the former Scotland back-row, has also returned as an assistant coach.Related content: Alex Sanderson calls time on SaracensSarries’ six England RWC 2019 final starters have penned new deals. It remains to be seen how they will be used. However, when it comes to the crunch of the expected play-off final, the likes of Owen Farrell and Maro Itoje may well be making an appearance. Championship team-by-team guideThis season’s Greene King IPA Championship finally kicks off this weekend – but it will be more of a sprint than a marathon. Teams will play each other home or away over 11 rounds, with one side each week having a bye. There will also be three reserve weekends (3-4 April, 8-9 May and 5-6 June).That will result in ten league matches per team and the top two in the table will meet in a two-leg play-off final on 12 and 19 June. The winner of that will be promoted to the Premiership providing they satisfy the Minimum Standards Criteria. There will be no relegation to National One this season.Related content: RFU scraps relegation for this seasonOnly 11 teams will compete in this season’s Championship because London Scottish decided they could not afford to participate. The clubs are required to invest in Covid testing that is funded only by ten-year government loans, not grants as had been hoped for.To offset the clubs’ loss of income during crowd-free times, games will be live-streamed. Revenues will be pooled and distributed for the benefit of all.Saracens and Ealing Trailfinders are the hot favourites to reach the play-off final, but the shorter format offers greater hope to the other challengers. Here’s how each club is shaping up ahead of kick-off… AMPTHILLLast season: 5thThe Bedfordshire club were strangely secretive about declaring new signings when RW contacted them back in December. They have plenty of new faces, among them locks Charlie Beckett (ex-Gloucester) and Lewelyn Jones (Nottingham), loosehead prop Alex Pleasants (Wasps, on loan) and centre Joe Roberts (Scarlets, on loan).Eight debutants featured in Ampthill’s 36-21 warm-up win at Bedford last weekend. Player-coach Dave Ward, the former Harlequins hooker, and Aleki Lutui, the former Tonga hooker playing tighthead, scored the first two of their five tries. Flanker Sam Hudson is captain.An admirable fifth last season, their first at this level, they have lost highly-rated wing Kwaku Asiedu to London Scottish and two Tongan international forwards: Soane Tonga’uiha has joined Chinnor as a player-coach and Maama Molitika has retired at the age of 45, his career including 160 appearances for Ampthill over seven seasons.Long wait: Ampthill v Pirates on 14 March 2020 – the last day a Championship match was played (Getty)BEDFORD BLUESLast season: 8thThe Blues signed a strategic partnership with Northampton last summer and the fruits of that were evident when a dozen Saints players rocked up to training at the start of February. Most are dual-registered and will only return to the Premiership club if called on for first-team fixtures, not for A League games as previously.The likes of hooker James Fish and second-row Lewis Bean, Glasgow-bound next season, started last week’s defeat by Ampthill and the bench included 18-year-old Ethan Grayson, son of former England stand-off Paul.Recent signings include giant Kiwi-born centre Elijah Niko (Ealing Trailfinders), who has played in France’s Top 14 and for Australia Sevens. Andre Robson (Yorkshire Academy) is another centre arrival while Irish prop Corrie Barrett joins from Munster as a replacement for the newly retired Alex Penny.Tommy Bell, the well-travelled fly-half who last year played for Asia Pacific Dragons in the World Tens Series, was recruited as a replacement for USA international Will Hooley, now at Saracens. But he has since signed as a medical joker for Stade Montois in France. Will Maisey played at ten last week, when Bedford’s scrum was a strong point.Other Blues departures are wing Dean Adamson (Rouen) and Ryan Hutler (Jersey), the top try-scorer last season, and second-row Ed Taylor (Blackheath), a rallying leader.Change of shirt: Will Hooley kicks a penalty for Bedford last year – the USA player is now at Sarries (Getty)CORNISH PIRATESLast season: 3rdThere’s little change in the Pirates squad that finished third last season. Back-five forward Josh Caulfield, signed from Exeter and loaned to Wasps last autumn, is the most notable addition. There are two new fly-halves in loanee Luke Scully (Cardiff Blues) and Harry Bazalgette (Exeter University), Scully being named Man of the Match in a recent 26-13 friendly win against Jersey Reds.The squad is supplemented by five dual-registered Exeter Chiefs players, while back-row James McRae had joined from the Chiefs before deciding to take a teaching job instead at Eton College. Lock Brett Beukeboom, a former Canada captain, retired last March and fellow Canuck Matt Evans hung up his boots to become Pirates’ team manager.The Cornish side are under joint head coaches Alan Paver and Gavin Cattle following Chris Stirling’s return to New Zealand on sabbatical. They have chosen Argentinian centre Nico De Battista, 30, as captain. “During these tough times, he has shown himself to be unwavering throughout,” says Cattle.Braced for contact: wing Robin Wedlake is part of an ambitious Pirates side (Getty Images)COVENTRYLast season: 4thThe Midlanders have had to cut their cloth squad-wise but have steadied the ship financially, including a £36,000 boost from a crowdfunding campaign. High-calibre players like Luke Wallace (Leicester), Rory Jennings (Clermont) and David Halaifonua (London Scottish) have moved on as Coventry put faith in a younger squad. When Coventry put a shoutout for U18s trials, around 100 players responded, almost all of whom had been with Premiership clubs.Notable additions include try-scoring hooker Nic Dolly from Sale Sharks and wing Tom Emery from England Sevens. Emery will be absent because he’s in the GB Sevens training squad for the Tokyo Olympics that were meant to have happened last summer. He will become Coventry’s first Olympian should he make the final squad.Related content: 2021 World Sevens Series scheduleTo compensate, Cov have signed Wasps’ Callum Sirker, a tremendous talent just back from a horrific knee injury. And look out for full-back Louis Brown, who has been in flying form.Other arrivals include hooker Suva Ma’asi, the son of a Tongan international, scrum-half Josh Barton (London Scottish) and full-back Tom Hudson, dual-registered from Gloucester.Coventry warmed up for the campaign with two fixtures against title favourites Saracens, losing 48-33 away and 47-12 at Barkers Butts Arena.Classy finish: Tom Emery scores for England Sevens – he could become Coventry’s first Olympian (Getty)DONCASTER KNIGHTSLast season: 10thThe average playing age has dropped from 32 to 24 at Doncaster, where head coach Steve Boden is not only contemplating his first season in charge but the delights of fatherhood after the birth of a daughter. Joe Ford and Nathan Smith are his assistants.There’s a raft of signings, one of the latest being lock Jerry Sexton, an ex-Jersey captain signed from Southern Kings who is the brother of Ireland captain Johnny. Scrum-half James Mitchell (Northampton), wing Jack Spittle (Nottingham), prop Gareth Denman (Coventry), wing Aaron Reed (Sale, loan) and back-row Guido Volpi (Ospreys, loan) are others on board.Knight shift: Sam Olver calls a mark (Getty Images)Elder statesmen Colin Quigley, Michael Hills and Tyson Lewis, the club’s top try-scorer in the pro era, are among the departees. Pete Lucock is arguably the biggest loss, the centre having joined Newcastle.Doncaster prepared for this week’s kick-off by playing Saracens and Ealing (twice) in the Trailfinders Challenge Cup. They lost all three games convincingly but it helped get some rust out of the system.EALING TRAILFINDERSLast season: 2nd LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Warm-up: a pre-season match between Saracens and Ealing – the sides expected to contest the final (Getty) Big responsibility: Joel Kpoku hopes to thrive for a Sarries side adjusting to a different level (Getty)Can’t get to the shops? 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New Community Festival celebrates church’s diversity

first_img Rector Belleville, IL Featured Events Rector Martinsville, VA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Tags New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR July 11, 2012 at 1:32 pm Fabulous!! Associate Rector Columbus, GA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rhonda Muir says: By Araceli MaPosted Jul 10, 2012 Director of Music Morristown, NJ General Convention 2012 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 [Episcopal News Service] Monument Circle in downtown Indianapolis on July 9 played host to the New Community Festival organized by the offices for ethnic ministries in the Episcopal Church. The festival to celebrate the diversity of the Episcopal Church included music, dance and food. The Rev. Zoila Manzanares-Cole of Christ Church Cathedral in Indianapolis was commissioned to provide the staff and organize the logistics for the party. Photos by Araceli Ma, a member of the ENS news team at General Convention.Red Leaf Singers from the Rosebud Sioux Reservation, South Dakota.The Rev.Angela Ifill, missioner for Black Ministries and the Rev. Anthony Guillén, missioner for Latino/Hispanic Ministries, offer a warm welcome to the party.A mariachi band provides the music as the Rev. Winfred Vergara, missioner for Asian-American Ministries, dances with the Rev. Yamily Bass-Choate from the Diocese of New York.Blandina Salvador, a Filipina from Jackson Heights, New York, dances with the Rev. Petero Sabune, Africa partnership officer for the Episcopal Church. Ethnic Ministries, In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Press Release Service Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Knoxville, TN Submit a Job Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA New Community Festival celebrates church’s diversity Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Tampa, FL Rector Washington, DC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Pittsburgh, PA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York center_img Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Albany, NY Submit a Press Release Submit an Event Listing Cathedral Dean Boise, ID TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Youth Minister Lorton, VA Comments (1) Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Hopkinsville, KY General Convention, Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Collierville, TN Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Comments are closed. Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Bath, NC An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Smithfield, NC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Shreveport, LA last_img read more

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LEXINGTON: Douglas Hahn ordained seventh bishop

first_img Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Tags Rector Albany, NY House of Bishops Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Collierville, TN Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group LEXINGTON: Douglas Hahn ordained seventh bishop John Andrews says: Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Tampa, FL Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Smithfield, NC Submit a Job Listing Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Associate Rector Columbus, GA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Featured Jobs & Calls TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Bath, NC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Belleville, IL By Kay Collier McLaughlin Posted Dec 17, 2012 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Submit a Press Release In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Comments (1) Comments are closed. Bishop Consecrations, Rector Shreveport, LA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Director of Music Morristown, NJ Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Press Release Service Rector Washington, DC December 17, 2012 at 4:58 pm To the Good People of the Diocese of Lexington:Grace and God’s peace to you as you start a new walk with your new bishop. Doug Hahn is a holy man of prayer and he will work hard for you. You have done a good job and I congratuate you both……………….Blessings this Holy Season of Advent……….what a wonderful way to start a new church year. Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ The Rt. Rev. Douglas Hahn, the seventh bishop of the Diocese of Lexington, and his family following his Dec. 15 ordination. Photo/Sarah Smith[Episcopal Diocese of Lexington] “I come from a family of quilters, who take many different patterns and fabrics, old and new, and blend them together to create something of great, long lasting beauty,” the Rev. Douglas Hahn said to a media conference the day before his consecration. “I believe the role of a bishop is something like the role of the quilter…”The ordination of the seventh bishop of the Diocese of Lexington on Dec. 15 was planned around the  theme “Quilting our Future Together,” with the Anglican music of cathedral and diocesan choirs, traditional Kentucky musicians, brass choir, a young people’s group, and an arrangement of the 23rd Psalm from Bobby McFerrin setting a rich context for the new episcopate.  Pleasant Company, a traditional music group from St. Patrick’s in Somerset , Kentucky, provided the voluntary during which Hahn moved toward the examination, with their arrangement of “Ashokan Farewell” by Jay Ungar, which they had played during the counting of the final ballot of the electing convention.  The Old Testament Lesson was read in Haitian Creole and English, to mark the commitment of the Diocese of Lexington to her companion diocese, the Diocese of Haiti; the Gospel was proclaimed in both English and Spanish as a mark of the building of relationship with the local Latino/Hispanic communities throughout the Diocese of Lexington.The Rt. Rev. Neil Alexander, dean of the School of Theology, the University of the South, was the preacher.  Serving as co-consecrators with chief consecrator Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori  were Alexander, the Rt. Rev. Terry White, bshop of Kentucky, the Rt. Rev. Stacy F. Sauls, chief operating officer of the Episcopal Church and sixth bishop of Lexington; the Rt. Rev. Chilton R. Knudsen, bishop of Maine, retired, and interim assisting bishop of Lexington; and the Rt. Rev. William O. Gafkjen, bshop of the Indiana-Kentucky Synod of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America.Testimonials were presented by Ann Davis McClain, treasurer and interim secretary of the diocese; Buck Hinkle, chancellor; the Rev. Deacon Mary Kilborn-Huey, chair of the Commission on Ministry;  the Rev. Jan M. Cottrell, president of the Standing Committee;  and the Rt. Rev. George D. Young, bishop of East Tennessee, representing the bishops of the church.  The Very Rev. Carol Wade, dean of Christ Church Cathedral, welcomed the large crowd to the ordination.  The congregation included a large contingent of visitors from St. Thomas Church in Columbus, Georgia, where Hahn was rector at the time of his election, as well as family and friends from across the country.  The mayor of Lexington, the Hon. Jim Gray; and ecumenical and interfaith partners; the Most Rev. Ronald Gainer, bishop of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Lexington;  and the Rev. Marian McClure, executive director of the Kentucky Council of Churches also were participants in the ceremony.On Friday evening, at a pre-consecration dinner near the cathedral and diocesan offices, the Rev. Jan M. Cottrell, president of the Standing Committee of the Diocese of Lexington, acting on behalf of Governor Steve Brashear, presented Kentucky Colonel Commissions to Jefferts Schori and Hahn.The seating of Hahn at Christ Church Cathedral in will be held during the annual convention of the Diocese of Lexington, Thursday, Feb. 21, 2013.— Kay Collier McLaughlin is deputy for leadership development, transitions and communications in the Diocese of Lexington.  The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Knoxville, TN Featured Events AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Submit an Event Listing Rector Hopkinsville, KY Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Cathedral Dean Boise, IDlast_img read more

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