Anglican leaders explore global church and state relationships during USPG…

first_img Featured Jobs & Calls Posted Jun 14, 2019 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem [Anglican Communion News Service] Navigating the changing relationship between the state and the church has been the focus of discussions between Anglican leaders from Africa, Asia, Latin America, the Caribbean and Oceania taking part in United Society Partners in the Gospel’s triennial International Consultation in Barbados, this week.“The consultation is focusing on relationships between church and state across the Anglican Communion,” the organization’s chief executive officer, Duncan Dormor, said. “Experiences vary greatly: for some discriminatory practices are commonplace, for others attempts are made to co-opt the influence of the church. For bishops and archbishops the issue of when and how to speak out, and when to remain silent, is a fundamental one.”Read the full article here. Tags Anglican leaders explore global church and state relationships during USPG gathering Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Washington, DC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Curate Diocese of Nebraska TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Albany, NY Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Press Release Service Submit a Press Release Cathedral Dean Boise, ID New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Collierville, TN Featured Events Rector Bath, NC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Anglican Communion Submit a Job Listing Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Tampa, FL Submit an Event Listing Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Belleville, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Knoxville, TN Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Pittsburgh, PA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Martinsville, VA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Director of Music Morristown, NJ last_img read more

Read More →

Episcopal churches, ministries continue to serve the homeless, food-insecure families…

first_img Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS By Lynette Wilson Posted Mar 13, 2020 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing COVID-19, Director of Music Morristown, NJ Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Press Release Service Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Episcopal churches, ministries continue to serve the homeless, food-insecure families despite COVID-19 Holy Apostles Soup Kitchen in Manhattan is one of the largest soup kitchens in the nation. In response to the coronavirus pandemic, it is serving bagged lunches rather than hot, plated lunches beginning March 16. Photo: Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service] Episcopal churches nationwide continue to operate homeless shelters, soup kitchens, food pantries and other outreach ministries, even as buildings begin to close to in-person worship and gatherings.“One of the reasons I’m glad that we suspended [worship] services is that it allows our leaders who have these really important ministries to focus their energies there,” Washington Bishop Mariann Budde told Episcopal News Service in a March 13 telephone conversation. “And that’s what’s happening. … It was really important that we maintain those ministries, but also enter into them with wits about us in terms of how to serve people in environments in close proximity.”The dioceses of Washington and Virginia were among the first to suspend in-person worship services for at least two weeks as a precaution aimed at stemming transmission of COVID-19, or the new coronavirus, which the World Health Organization declared a global pandemic on March 11. The dioceses’ announcement affected more than 250 congregations in Washington, D.C., and suburban Maryland and Virginia. Other dioceses, including New York, Southern Virginia, Delaware, California and all four Michigan dioceses, have since taken similar measures. Click here for information on individual dioceses.Episcopal News Service’s complete coronavirus coverage can be found here.The Episcopal Church’s online resource page for coronavirus response is here.Across the Diocese of Washington, groups of clergy and lay members have self-organized to share ideas, practices and information from civic partners and public health officials regarding the continuation of services to the vulnerable populations that depend on them without putting those in need of services and those providing services at greater risk, Budde said.Charlie’s Place is one such ministry in Washington, D.C., Budde said, that continues to provide meals and services to homeless people from its base at St. Margaret’s Episcopal Church near Dupont Circle. Another, the Church of the Epiphany on G Street, serves people downtown, and the Church of the Ascension works with vulnerable populations to the south in Lexington Park, Maryland.In a March 12 message to clergy, Virginia Bishop Susan E. Goff included recommended best practices for food banks and food ministries, such as limiting the number of people allowed in at one time, documenting who’s handling groceries, maintaining reserves and preparing quarantine boxes.An estimated 550,000 people are homeless in the United States, and food insecurity poses a threat nationwide, where 11 percent of households suffered food shortages at some point in 2018, according to the most recent data from the U.S. Department of Agriculture.“During these challenging times, we need to be especially aware of our neighbors in need,” said Rebecca Linder Blachly, director of The Episcopal Church’s Washington, D.C.-based Office of Government Relations. “We have a responsibility to protect those who are most vulnerable through our collective actions, primarily through social distancing. But that means we must also find new ways to care for one another – financially supporting organizations that are continuing to provide services, calling our neighbors to see how they are faring and what they need, and recognizing the disruption and hardship this pandemic is causing.”Her office, she said, is “pushing the U.S. government to put more protections in place, including family leave, paid sick leave, unemployment insurance and a robust social safety net.”On March 13, the Office of Government Relations released a Public Health and Policy Advocacy Document in response to the spread of the coronavirus.It offers a reminder that Christians have the obligation to care for people who are poor, sick, imprisoned or strangers, as called for in Matthew 25:34-46. It also suggests that churches encourage everyone to adhere to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s recommended ways of reducing the spread of the coronavirus. The CDC also includes specific recommendations for faith communities.As of March 12, the virus was reported to have spread to 46 states and the District of Columbia, and President Donald Trump declared a national emergency, allocating $50 billion in funds to fight the epidemic in the United States and its territories – all areas where The Episcopal Church has a presence. For now, coronavirus-related restrictions vary widely across rural, urban, and suburban areas served by the church.In Kansas City, Missouri – an area relatively untouched by COVID-19 as of March 12 – a soup kitchen run by an Episcopal-affiliated nonprofit will continue serving free meals every weekday, with a few potential changes. Kansas City Community Kitchen feeds 400 to 500 people per day, many of whom have a higher risk of contracting the virus, according to the Rev. Gar Demo, board chair of the nonprofit.“Since we’re serving a primarily homeless community, … this community is highly vulnerable to the COVID because most of them don’t have access to medical care or testing and are also already probably immune-suppressed and sick,” Demo told ENS by phone.“So, on the one hand, our service is absolutely critical right now because it’s the [only] food that they’re going to get. But then, also, we have to be as wise as we can in how we’re doing it.”The Diocese of West Missouri has not closed churches, but even if it did, Kansas City Community Kitchen would not be affected because it has its own location downtown. Kansas City’s mayor declared a state of emergency on March 12, banning all gatherings of more than 1,000 people, but the kitchen doesn’t cross that threshold.Still, the kitchen is making changes to reduce the risk to its clients, including setting up hand sanitizing stations and shifting volunteer duties. It usually serves meals restaurant-style, but that may change to single-serving meals to go, to avoid having hundreds of people gathered in the building. Bringing food trucks in has been discussed as a possibility, Demo said.“We’re trying to figure out creatively what we’re going to need to do,” Demo told ENS. “You don’t want to pull the service away from people that are depending on us for their sustenance and nutrition. And on the other hand, we’ve got to be aware of the fact that people will be at risk.”New York Mayor Bill de Blasio declared a state of emergency in the city on March 12, that same day Holy Apostles Soup Kitchen in Manhattan’s Chelsea neighborhood, one of the largest soup kitchens in the country, announced it would modify its meal outreach and social services program in response to the coronavirus. Beginning March 16 and continuing at least through April 6, the soup kitchen will temporarily suspend its volunteer program and will distribute bagged meals instead of a daily cafeteria-style lunch, according to a press release.“The soup kitchen is proud of its long-standing reputation as a cornerstone in the Chelsea community, and we do not take lightly the decision to modify our programming,” said the Rev. Anna S. Pearson, executive director of the Holy Apostles Soup Kitchen, in the release. “We are taking these precautions to protect all members of our community, while also recognizing many of our guests do not have the means to stock up on groceries. When your bank account is near zero or you don’t have your own place to call home, planning for a global pandemic is almost impossible, and the only food many of our guests eat is the meal they get here. We remain committed to our vital role in sustaining our neighbors who are struggling with hunger and poverty throughout this crisis.”Holy Apostles also provides weekend meals through its Backpack Pantry Program, serving senior citizens on fixed incomes and families of local public school children who live in shelters. As of March 13, New York City public schools remain open, but Holy Apostles’ kitchen staff is planning its response should the schools close and families need additional meals.Further downtown, the Rev. Phillip A. Jackson, priest-in-charge and vicar of Trinity Church Wall Street, announced on March 13 that Trinity suspended all public services and activities – including its Brown Bag Lunch Ministry – at Trinity Church and St. Paul’s Chapel, five blocks to the north.“While we are not aware of any confirmed cases of coronavirus among our community, we have made this decision out of an abundance of caution,” Jackson said in a letter to the congregation.– Lynette Wilson is managing editor of Episcopal News Service. She can be reached at [email protected] Egan Millard, assistant editor and reporter for Episcopal News Service, contributed to this report. He can be reached at [email protected] Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Submit a Press Release Rector Knoxville, TN Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Collierville, TN Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Smithfield, NC Tags Rector Bath, NC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Washington, DC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Job Listing In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Featured Events New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books center_img Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Albany, NY Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Health & Healthcare Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Tampa, FL Curate Diocese of Nebraska Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Belleville, IL Rector Pittsburgh, PA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Martinsville, VA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Hopkinsville, KY Associate Rector Columbus, GA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZlast_img read more

Read More →

National Lottery funded projects exhibited at Tate Modern

first_imgThe exhibition is designed to celebrate and showcase the diverse range of schemes and projects funded by the lottery distributor.The Right Hon Tessa Jowell MP, Chair of the Millennium Commission, said: “Not enough people know where their Lottery money has gone. When people visit the Out of Time exhibition I believe they will be impressed by the size, scale and diversity of the Millennium Commission’s investment which has changed the landscape of the UK.” About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Tate Modern is hosting a photographic exhibition of projects funded by the Millennium Commission.The ‘Out of Time’ exhibition which runs from 1 to 19 December 2003 features 70 images of projects funded by the Millennium Commission. These sit alongside creative photography and artwork by a number of Millennium Award winners. These were picked from over 30,000 people who have won Millennium Awards.The exhibition will travel to other Millennium Commission-funded venues in 2004. Advertisement Howard Lake | 1 December 2003 | Newscenter_img National Lottery funded projects exhibited at Tate Modern  16 total views,  1 views todaylast_img read more

Read More →

OPA recruits focus on safety during firearms training

first_img By Digital AIM Web Support – February 24, 2021 TAGS  Twitter Facebook Facebook OPA recruits focus on safety during firearms training Pinterest WhatsAppcenter_img Local NewsLaw Enforcement Odessa Police Academy recruits train on the OPD shooting range Thursday morning. Jimmie Rainey knew at the age of 19 that he wanted to become a peace officer.The 23-year-old Tennessean said he applied to multiple law enforcement agencies throughout the country and the first invitation he received came from the Odessa Police Academy.Rainey and five other men and women make up the 18th OPA session and those six recruits were practicing firearms training this week at the Odessa Police Department Shooting Range.During Thursday’s media session, Rainey — who is still on active duty for the Army National Guard — talked about the firearms training he has experienced at the OPA.“It’s all about safety,” Rainey said. “They are trying to make sure that you are safe in everything that you do. If you are ever put in a situation where you have to stop a threat, the biggest thing is making sure that you know where all of our rounds are going and that you aren’t shooting rounds randomly.”Graduation for the 18th session of the OPA is set to take place at 3 p.m. Aug. 2 at the MCM Eleganté Hotel. However, before any of the six recruits can receive their badges they have to complete firearms training. The recruits were training Thursday with SIG Sauer P320 .40 caliber handguns.OPD range master and Sgt. Carlos Chavez said every recruit needs 48 hours of firearms training, while peace officers need annual training for all firearms they use in the line of duty. Chavez has been the range master since 2003 and a firearms instructor since 1994.“Every time an officer has been involved (in a shooting), they’ve thanked me for all the training, because it came into play and it saved their life,” Chavez said. “It makes you feel good that you’ve been doing something good for them.”The recruits practiced a variety of shooting positions during Thursday’s training session.OPD firearms instructor Sgt. Tommy Jones said this week’s training will be very important when the recruits are on the streets. Jones has been a firearms instructor since 2010.“You won’t know what to encounter as an officer, because every day will be different,” Jones said. “You get into different situations every day. There are days that you will have to draw your weapon. There are days where you won’t have to draw your weapon. Every day is a surprise.“Our job as instructors is to get (recruits) to the point where they can and can’t pull their firearm. If they have to use (their firearm), we show them how to use it accurately and how to keep themselves and the citizens of Odessa alive.” WhatsApp Pinterest Twitter Previous article052819_Deko_Uno_JF_01Next articleTEXAS LEAGUE BASEBALL: RockHounds erupt late to beat RoughRiders Digital AIM Web Supportlast_img read more

Read More →

Medical professionals honored

first_imgSkip You Might Like Girl Scouts offers opportunities for girls and volunteers Annual recruitment events are taking place throughout Southern Alabama Council of the Girl Scouts of America. Not only is the… read more Moore said, when people leave their home communities and go out into the world, they are a reflection of their homes and their communities.“This group speaks well for all of us,” he said. Email the author Book Nook to reopen Around the WebMd: Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch)Blood Sugar BlasterIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Healthier LivingRemoving Moles & Skin Tags Has Never Been This EasyEssential HealthMost 10 Rarest Skins for FortniteTCGThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancel Remember America’s heroes on Memorial Day Md: Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch) Print Article Medical professionals honored Latest Storiescenter_img Troy falls to No. 13 Clemson “I thought that this group of people was phenomenal,” said Henry Moore, Jr., program leader. “For such a large group from a small community like Brundidge to have excelled in the medical field is something we can all be proud of. Not only have they excelled from an educational standpoint, they have all decided to give something back to their communities.”Moore commended the honorees on their accomplishments and on being positive role models for young people.“As role models, they can share in the successes of the young people they mentor,” he said. “Young people are more influenced by what they see than what they hear and this group is setting good examples for young people to follow.“Children are born unlimited. We limit them by their environments. So, we must always go to the extremes when it comes to kids. This group of honorees is making a difference now and for the future by the examples that they are setting for our young people and the good they are doing in their communities. They are to be congratulated.” Sweet Pilgrim Missionary Baptist Church in Brundidge celebrated its Annual Men and Women’s Day on Sunday and recognized 10 of those from the Brundidge area who are serving their communities through the medical profession.The theme for the annual recognition program was “Men and Women on a Christian Journey.Recognized for their Christian walk and their service to others were Latavia Barrow, respiratory therapist; Marilyn Harvey and Latosha L. Williams, registered nurses; Peggy Land, Sonya R. Lee and Keisha Ray, licensed practical nurses; Michael Bivins, DyJerlynn Lampley Copeland, Tim Lee and Sabrina Pennington, physicians.Constance Bivins was recognized as a “Special Jewel” for her long and continuous service to the Brundidge community and her support and encouragement of its young people. Plans underway for historic Pike County celebration Published 11:00 pm Monday, October 1, 2012 Sponsored Content By Blood Sugar Blaster Pike County Sheriff’s Office offering community child ID kits By Jaine Treadwelllast_img read more

Read More →

Coronavirus updates: China increases Wuhan death toll by 50%

first_imgSamara Heisz/iStock(NEW YORK) — More than 2.1 million people have been diagnosed with the novel coronavirus worldwide as the spread of the virus continues.The global coronavirus death toll stands at more than 145,000 people, according to data compiled by the Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins University. The actual numbers are believed to be much higher due to a number of deaths in which a person is not tested for the virus.Many cities and states have begun counting probable deaths caused by COVID-19, including New York City, the epicenter of the disease in the United States.The U.S. has more cases and deaths than any country in the world, with at least 671,425 diagnosed cases and at least 33,286 deaths. Just 24 hours prior, the death toll was 28,364.More than 56,000 people in the U.S. have recovered from COVID-19. Here’s how the news is developing Friday. All times Eastern:6:35 a.m.: China increases Wuhan death toll by 50%Chinese officials overnight said they had underestimated the number of people that died from COVID-19 at the epicenter of the outbreak, in Wuhan, by 50%. The country added 1,290 dead to its readjusted total for Wuhan, with a death toll that now stands at 3,869 in the city.China said this was not a cover-up, rather an adjustment to numbers based on new information coming from places like prisons and care facilities.The timing of this adjustment comes as President Donald Trump criticized China for its underreporting of deaths and cases at the start of the outbreak.French President Emmanuel Macron added his voice to the growing skepticism of China’s handling of the pandemic.“There are clearly things that have happened that we don’t know about,” Macron told the Financial Times.3:45 a.m.: Illinois has deadliest day since pandemic beganAs President Donald Trump talks with governors about reopening the country and cautious optimism rises with COVID-related hospital admissions down in many cities, Illinois had its worst day since the pandemic began.At least 125 people died in the state in the last 24 hours, which brings the statewide coronavirus death to at least 1,072 residents.“While these numbers are disheartening, I don’t want people to despair,” Illinois Dept. of Public Health Director Dr. Ngozi Ezike said, according to ABC Chicago station WLS-TV. “Instead, I want them to renew our collective resolve to do what is needed to end the pandemic. We continue to learn and amass new information about this virus every single day.”Illinois Gov. J.B. Pritzker also announced Thursday new testing sites in the state and that Illinois has joined a coalition of other Midwestern governors to explore how to improve their economies.The state’s unemployment rate rose 1.2%, to 4.6%, Thursday and lost at least 34,000 jobs, the Illinois Department of Employment Security announced. Nationwide, the staggering number of people who have filed for unemployment amid the pandemic has suppressed 20 million. More than 5.2 million filed for unemployment insurance just in the last week, the U.S. Department of Labor said Thursday.Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

Read More →

Experian says reporting tenants’ rent DOES help improve their credit scores

first_imgHome » News » Experian says reporting tenants’ rent DOES help improve their credit scores previous nextProducts & ServicesExperian says reporting tenants’ rent DOES help improve their credit scoresMany letting agents have already been reporting their tenants’ rent payments via both Experian’s Rental Exchange and a clutch of proptech firms.Nigel Lewis24th October 201801,272 Views Experian has revealed that nearly 80% of tenants who allow their rent to be recognised by a credit reference agency see an improvement in their credit score.The claim is made by the company after revealing that it is to include the rental payments history of 1.2 million tenants renting in both the social and private housing sectors.Experian has led the field in rent recognition over the past two years during which it has set up a system to capture the payments of tenants from 150 social housing providers and larger estate agents, while private renters have been able to self-report their payments via proptech initiatives such as CreditLadder and Canopy.But while this data has been stored, it is only now that the benefit of the payments will begin to filter through into the Experian files lenders use to assess creditworthiness.Credit score“Tenants pay a significant amount of money each month for the roofs over their heads, so it’s right to recognise these regular payments in a similar way as mortgages,” says Clive Lawson, Managing Director of Experian Consumer Services.“Adding rental payment data to credit reports would help millions of people prove their identity so they can access online services and mainstream finance.“We’re already working with a range of lenders who want to use rental data to improve their understanding of a person’s financial situation so they can make higher quality decisions.”Sheraz Dar, who is CEO of one of the proptech firms named by Experian, says: “As the first and biggest rent reporting platform in the UK we’re delighted that tenants are now getting the benefit they deserve.”Canopy Sheraz Dar Clive Lawson credit scores creditladder Experian October 24, 2018Nigel LewisWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles Letting agent fined £11,500 over unlicenced rent-to-rent HMO3rd May 2021 BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021last_img read more

Read More →

Assistant/Associate Professor Position in Governance of Autonomous Systems & Artificial

first_imgPosting Details Quick Linkhttps://www.sujobopps.com/postings/85522 Priority Consideration01/31/2021 Application Instructions Job #075488 The Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs, SyracuseUniversity, seeks to hire a social scientist with expertise inregulatory policy design, regulatory policy processes, and/or riskregulation as related to emerging technologies. We are specificallyinterested in candidates with demonstrated research interests inregulation and/or risk governance relating to the use and societalimpacts of autonomous systems, such as driverless vehicles andunmanned aerial vehicles, artificial intelligence (AI), andautonomous decision making. Research interests could include, amongothers: governance of the development and use of autonomoussystems/AI, analysis of societal risks posed by public and privateapplications of autonomous systems/AI, design and analysis ofregulatory policies for managing risks associated with applicationsof autonomous systems/AI, design and evaluation of performancestandards by which autonomous systems/AI are regulated, andregulation of human control over autonomous systems/AI.The position is at the rank of assistant or associate professor andwill be in the Department of Public Administration andInternational Affairs, situated within the Maxwell School. TheMaxwell School is ranked #1 in the nation for graduate education inpublic affairs, according to the 2021 edition of U.S. News &World Report’s Best Graduate Schools, and home to the socialscience disciplines at Syracuse University. Hours About the Syracuse area Qualifications RankAssistant Job Description Unionized Position CodeNot Applicable determined by department/chair CampusSyracuse, NY Job TypeFull-time Commitment to Supporting and Hiring Veterans The faculty member hired into this position will be affiliated withthe Autonomous Systems Policy Institute ( ASPI ), which is housedin the Maxwell School and centers on interdisciplinary scholarshipand teaching related to the design, policy, and social implicationsof autonomous systems. Faculty will also have the opportunity toaffiliate with other interdisciplinary research institutes andcenters within the Maxwell School and across Syracuse University.This position will be part of an ambitious Invest Syracuse ClusterHire Initiative in the area of Artificial Intelligence andAutonomous Systems, providing exciting opportunities forcollaboration in teaching and research in an organized cluster thatspans multiple departments in the Maxwell School, the College ofLaw, the College of Engineering and Computer Science, and theSchool of Information Studies. It is expected that candidates for this position will have doctoraltraining in public policy, public administration, politicalscience, economics, sociology, and related interdisciplinaryprograms. We seek candidates whose research, teaching, service, orlived experiences have prepared them to contribute to ourcommitment to diversity, equity, and inclusion in our work withstudents, colleagues, and wider communities. Tools/Equipment Pay RangeCommensurate w/ Experience Syracuse is a medium-sized city situated in the geographic centerof New York State approximately 250 miles northwest of New YorkCity. The metro-area population totals approximately 500,000. Thearea offers a low cost of living and provides many social,cultural, and recreational options, including parks, museums,festivals, professional regional theater, and premier shoppingvenues. Syracuse and Central New York present a wide range ofseasonal recreation and attractions ranging from water skiing andsnow skiing, hiking in the Adirondacks, touring the historic sites,visiting wineries along the Finger Lakes, and biking on trailsalong the Erie Canal.center_img Job CategoryFaculty Syracuse University has a long history of engaging veterans and themilitary-connected community through its educational programs,community outreach, and employment programs. After World War II,Syracuse University welcomed more than 10,000 returning veterans toour campus, and those veterans literally transformed SyracuseUniversity into the national research institution it is today. TheUniversity’s contemporary commitment to veterans builds on thishistorical legacy, and extends to both class-leading initiativesfocused on making an SU degree accessible and affordable to thepost-9/11 generation of veterans, and also programs designed toposition Syracuse University as the employer of choice for militaryveterans, members of the Guard and Reserve, and military familymembers. Syracuse University is an equal-opportunity, affirmative-actioninstitution. The University prohibits discrimination and harassmentbased on race, color, creed, religion, sex, gender, nationalorigin, citizenship, ethnicity, marital status, age, disability,sexual orientation, gender identity and gender expression, veteranstatus, or any other status protected by applicable law to theextent prohibited by law. This nondiscrimination policy coversadmissions, employment, and access to and treatment in Universityprograms, services, and activities. Syracuse University is a private, international research universitywith distinctive academics, diversely unique offerings and anundeniable spirit. Located in the geographic heart of New YorkState, with a global footprint, and nearly 150 years of history,Syracuse University offers a quintessential collegeexperience.The scope of Syracuse University is a testament to its strengths: apioneering history dating back to 1870; a choice of more than 200majors and 100 minors offered through 13 schools and colleges;nearly 15,000 undergraduates and 5,000 graduate students; more thana quarter of a million alumni in 160 countries; and a studentpopulation from all 50 U.S. states and 123 countries. For moreinformation, please visit www.syracuse.edu. FLSA StatusExempt Syracuse University maintains an inclusive learning environment inwhich students, faculty, administrators, staff, curriculum, socialactivities, governance, and all other aspects of campus lifereflect a diverse, multi-cultural, and international worldview. TheUniversity community recognizes and values the many similaritiesand differences among individuals and groups. At Syracuse, we arecommitted to preparing students to understand, live among,appreciate, and work in an inherently diverse country and worldmade up of people with different ethnic and racial backgrounds,military backgrounds, religious beliefs, socio-economic status,cultural traditions, abilities, sexual orientations and genderidentities. To do so, we commit ourselves to promoting a communitythat celebrates and models the principles of diversity andinclusivity. EEOC Commitment to a Diverse and Inclusive Campus Community LocationSyracuse, New York In addition to completing an online application, please attach acurriculum vitae and cover letter.Applications will be reviewed as they arrive with fullconsideration given to those received by Jan 31, 2021. However, thedepartment will continue to consider applications until thisposition is filled. Job Posting Date12/15/2020 Open Until FilledYes Responsibilities Job Specific Qualifications About Syracuse University Application Deadline Job TitleAssistant/Associate Professor Position in Governance ofAutonomous Systems & Artificial Intelligence Physical Requirements Message to Applicantslast_img read more

Read More →

Committee recommends rise in sports funding

first_imgThe committee set up to review sports provision in Oxford has this week announced a near doubling of the funding for sports within the University.It also proposes greater coordination between the University and colleges, which should save colleges money.The funding increase would be achieved by an increase in the college levy. Colleges currently contribute £150,000 per year to sports facilities, but since 1966 this has fallen behind inflation. The report recommends that £30 million be raised to develop the sports facilities at Iffley road.The report heavily criticised the current state of sports provision in Oxford. “Facilities for sport at Oxford are seriously inadequate for modern requirements in terms of quality, quantity and range of activities covered.”Oxford did not compare well with its peer universities in terms of sports provision. There was also concern on the over-provision for team sports at college level. The cost to individual colleges per game of team sport such as rugby can be up to £900.While welcoming increased funding for sports in principle, OUSU has struck out at a part of the report which appears to suggest that if funding for the Iffley Road development cannot be met through donations and other fundraising, it should be covered by introducing a charge to all students.The report states that the £30 million needed for the Iffley Road plans could be covered by borrowing the money. This would lead to £3 million per year interest, which could be covered by a charge of £150 per year to each student. A motion passed unanimously at OUSU Council on Wednesday opposed “the possibility of a regressive per capita levy on individual students of £150 per year for the next 30 years.”Jonny Medland, OUSU VP for AcAff commented, “Broadly speaking the review has come back with excellent conclusions. There’s a definite need to improve sports facilities at Oxford… Sport is an integral part of student life at Oxford and anything which improves the student experience in this way is a good thing.”His concerns lay with the principle of charging students for improvements to facilities. “Even if this is the worst-case scenario for funding the project, it’s important that we say now that the costs of the project shouldn’t be charged to students in this way.”A spokesperson from Oxford University stated that, “The mention of tuition fees and a £150 levy within this report was illustrative of the maximum per capita cost of funding a new sports complex. It is there to give a sense of scale and context. It was certainly not a proposal.”last_img read more

Read More →

Ocean City Joins Forces to Offer Thanksgiving Meals to Community

first_imgBy MADDY VITALEIn a showing of community spirit, Ocean City organizations are making sure that despite the cancelation of dinners traditionally provided to families in need over Thanksgiving, special holiday meals will be provided.And those who are used to fellowship and friendship at the dinners year after year will know, that even though they can’t all be assembled for the feast due to the COVID-19 pandemic, they are cared for and loved by the community, said organizers of the dinner.St. John Lutheran Church always does Thanksgiving dinner. St. Peters United Methodist Church does Christmas dinner. For both meals, people will either receive takeout or delivery packages from members of the Ocean City High School Key Club. And OCNJ CARE is funding the meals.While plans are still in the works for the Christmas dinner, Thanksgiving meals are being prepared Wednesday. Desserts were being made on Monday, explained Jen Bowman, who is in charge of St. Peters food ministry.She said that so far, everything has worked out wonderfully and there has been such an outpouring of support.“The need is so great that donations are needed and whatever people can give is greatly appreciated,” Bowman said.She continued, “I feel like a community conductor orchestrating donations.”More than 150 dinners will be made for deliveries. Social distancing will be strictly adhered to and the meals will be hung on recipients’ doors, Bowman said.On Wednesday, at 1 p.m. some members of the high school Key Club will bring the meals to people’s homes, Bowman said.The deliveries will be to locations including Wesley by the Bay and shut-ins.“God’s Kitchen will provide takeout meals outside of St. Pete’s Church on Wednesday on a first come, first serve basis,” Bowman explained.God’s Kitchen provides meals for those in need.Bowman noted that Mayor Jay Gillian wanted to make sure that these two holiday, community dinner events still took place in a safe manner to help those in need.Drew Fasy, chairman of OCNJ CARE, a non-profit organization that raises funds, identifies those in need and delivers aid where needed in the community, said of the Thanksgiving dinners and partnership between his organization and the churches, “I think it is a great thing. I know St. John traditionally did a Thanksgiving dinner and they couldn’t do it this year because of a lack of gathering.”He continued, “We thought the dinner was something we didn’t want to let go by the wayside. The meal is one thing and at its core we felt compelled to be involved.”St. Peters Church houses the food cupboard.Both Bowman and Fasy emphasized, it isn’t just about a turkey dinner with all the trimmings.“The other piece of it is the care and the connection people need during the holidays and the pandemic,” Fasy said. “We wanted to make sure people knew other people care.”He added that OCNJ CARE has been collecting canned goods and dry goods for several months.“If anyone is in need now or during the holidays, we can anonymously deliver the groceries,” Fasy pointed out.Fasy noted that a sizable donation of $2,000 will be provided to OCNJ CARE to help with the payment for the food from the Ocean City Yacht Club.In addition to meals, Bowman said that the organizers hope is to provide Thanksgiving cards to all of the recipients.Siblings Taj and Madison Keenan, of Ocean City made holiday cards for some people who will receiving dinners. The high school Key Club as well as the Upper Township Sunshine Elementary School Club is also making cards.“If anybody else wants to make Thanksgiving cards we will absolutely get them to people who need them. They can drop them off at St. Peters daily,” Bowman noted. “If you would like to make them for Christmas as well then we gladly accept find recipients for them.”Siblings Madison Keenan, left, and Taj, of Ocean City, make holiday cards for meal recipients. Volunteers Kathy Thompson, left, Bob Macnamara and Joanne Budnick start Thanksgiving dinner preparations Monday at St. Peters United Methodist Church. (Photos courtesy Jen Bowman)last_img read more

Read More →