East Derry MLA Dallat hits out at overhead cable thefts in Northwest

first_img Google+ East Derry MLA Dallat hits out at overhead cable thefts in Northwest Almost 10,000 appointments cancelled in Saolta Hospital Group this week News Facebook Business Matters Ep 45 – Boyd Robinson, Annette Houston & Michael Margey Pinterest Facebook LUH system challenged by however, work to reduce risk to patients ongoing – Dr Hamilton Calls for maternity restrictions to be lifted at LUH By News Highland – December 22, 2011 Google+center_img An East Derry MLA says lives will be put at risk following the theft of a substantial quantity of electric cable from Drumagarner, near Kilrea.The cable powers electric lights at St Mary’s Church, where hundreds will be attending masses and services over Christmas.John Dallat says the church car park is on the opposite side of a very fast and dangerous road, and he’s been told by the Roads Service that it’s unlikely that the cabling can be replaced before Christmas.He says the theft of such cabling has been going on right across the North West in Derry, Donegal and Tyrone, and it’s clear there is a market for it.Mr Dallat says anyone caught receiving the stolen cable should be dealt with harshly………[podcast]http://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/12/jdall.mp3[/podcast] Guidelines for reopening of hospitality sector published Previous articleFamily of Gary Butcher devastated with sentence passed on to his killerNext articleGovernment could end up controlling Donegal County Counil budget – Cllr O’Neill News Highland WhatsApp Twitter RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Twitter WhatsApp Pinterest Need for issues with Mica redress scheme to be addressed raised in Seanad alsolast_img read more

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Mandatory life terms handed to Liam Devlin’s killers

first_img Google+ By News Highland – December 18, 2009 Facebook Facebook Google+ 75 positive cases of Covid confirmed in North WhatsApp RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Pinterest Pinterest Twitter Gardai continue to investigate Kilmacrennan firecenter_img Man arrested on suspicion of drugs and criminal property offences in Derry Twitter Mandatory life terms handed to Liam Devlin’s killers 365 additional cases of Covid-19 in Republic Main Evening News, Sport and Obituaries Tuesday May 25th Further drop in people receiving PUP in Donegal Previous articleNorth west braced for cold snapNext articleCouncil outlines timetable for Milford works News Highland News WhatsApp Two Derry men who murdered a Donegal teenager in the city two years ago have been told they will serve a minimum of 11 years in prison.In October, 21 year old Sean Cruickshank, from Lislane Drive, and 22 year old Edward McEleney from Circular Road, were convicted of the murder of 19 year old Liam Devlin from Burnfoot.He died of brain injuries after he was attacked in Rinmore Drive in August 2007. Both men were given mandatory life terms at today’s sentening hearing.last_img read more

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One person arrested over spate of burglaries in cross-border operation

first_imgHomepage BannerNews WhatsApp Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows By News Highland – March 2, 2018 Loganair’s new Derry – Liverpool air service takes off from CODA Facebook RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Pinterest WhatsApp Community Enhancement Programme open for applications Twitter One person has been arrested in connection with a spate of burglaries in Donegal and Tyrone in recent weeks.The arrest is part of a cross-border operation between Donegal Gardai and the Police.In a statement police in Strabane have confirmed that they had received a number of reports of commercial burglaries in rural areas of Strabane recently which coincided with burglaries reported by Gardai in Donegal.As a result, PSNI officers working alongside An Garda Siochana, completed a number of searches on both sides of the border.Subsequently, one person has been arrested in relation to the offences and subsequent stolen items have been recovered.Gardai and police are asking the wider public to remain vigilant, especially in rural areas, make note of any suspicious vehicles and report them immediately.center_img Pinterest Facebook Previous articleStorm Emma: Almost 1400 Donegal customers without powerNext articleShiels frustrated as Derry still unable to train on new 3G pitch News Highland Google+ Google+ Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic One person arrested over spate of burglaries in cross-border operation News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th Twitter Nine til Noon Show – Listen back to Monday’s Programme last_img read more

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Ensemble brings ‘throat singing’ to Troy

first_img Plans underway for historic Pike County celebration Remember America’s heroes on Memorial Day With their “new old” Tuvan music, Alash stays true to the cultural traditions of their musical heritage while blending new influences to create a captivating and utterly unique musical experience, he said.Jinright said a West Virginia who has attended concerts by Elvis, the Stones, Bob Dylan and Jimmy Hendrix gave Alash the nod over all the others. Pike County Sheriff’s Office offering community child ID kits The Penny Hoarder Issues “Urgent” Alert: 6 Companies… The award-winning Alash Ensemble of Tuva will bring the beautiful and exotic sounds of their Inner Asian homeland to Pike County.The Troy Arts Council will sponsor three days of concerts by the Alash Ensemble of Tuva at local schools and a public concert at 7 p.m. Tuesday at the Claudia Crosby Theater on the campus of Troy University.“The three musicians who make up Alash – Bady-Dorzhu Ondar, Ayan-ool Sam and Ayan Shirizhik – have won numerous international awards in Tuvan throat singing, a technique which allows vocalists to sing multiple pitches at one time,” said Dr. John Jinright, TAC presenter chair. “Ensemble members also play a variety of Tuvan traditional instruments, contributing to an overall musical experience that a Washington Post review described as ��absolutely stunning.’” Ensemble brings ‘throat singing’ to Troy Around the WebMd: Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch)Blood Sugar BlasterIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Healthier LivingRemoving Moles & Skin Tags Has Never Been This EasyEssential HealthGet Fortnite SkinsTCGThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancel Email the author Published 3:00 am Saturday, October 31, 2015 By The Penny Hoarder Sponsored Content By Jaine Treadwell Print Article “We invite everyone to the Alash concert at 7 p.m. Tuesday night at the Crosby Theater,” he said. “It will be an incredible concert and one you won’t soon forget.”Tickets to the Alash concert are $20 and $5 for students. One hundred and twenty free student tickets will be available at student services. General admission tickets will be available at the door. Jinright said accolades for the Alash Ensemble come from around the globe and he expects the people of the Pike County area to become fast fans of Tuvan music once they are entertained by Alash.“‘Behind the Scene,’ Gloucestershire, UK reported that sometimes you see a performance so singular, so extraordinary, that you know the experience is going to live with you forever. And this was such a performance,” Jinright said, adding that the same response is expected when Alash takes the stage at the Crosby Theater Tuesday night.Jinright said that, last summer, Alash took part in international throat-singing festivals in their Tuvan homeland and the first-ever such festival in China. Alash has also collaborated with such diverse musical groups as Bela Fleck and the Flecktones, beatboxer Shodekeh, and American classical musicians. You Might Like WILD & WAXY (photos) SUBMITTED PHOTOCovenant Christian School participated in a “Living Wax Museum” Friday as part of their biography unit. Each student represented… read more Latest Stories Book Nook to reopen Skip Troy falls to No. 13 Clemsonlast_img read more

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Living it Up at the Holiday Inn

first_imgFollowing serious accomodation delays, a number of Oxford Brookes students will be forced to start their university careers from a room at the three-star Oxford Holiday Inn.Although those who chose Brookes as their first choice university have been guaranteed accomodation, some students admitted through Clearing or via their Insurance choice are beginning the term in the hotel.It’s a far cry from the purpose-built accommodation many had expected, due to be completed in October, though for as long as the university contributes to their costs, the forty students directly involved are unlikely to be complaining.Students will be expected to pay a small fee, which includes breakfast and shuttle trips to the campus, while the university subsidises the cost of the room. An on-site warden is available for help with any housing – or hotelier – issues.In a city with extremely high demand for places in university accommodation, Oxford Brookes has historically guaranteed a place in halls only to those who placed them as their first choice.This year registrar Paul Large said that the university had “proved a popular choice”, leading to a larger proportion of students wishing to stay in halls than in previous years.Accommodation construction on Chapel Street was underway, with the capacity to house almost 200 students from universities across Oxford, scheduled for completion in October.Students in Oxford have long been aware of a shortage of houses, with letting agents this year reporting increased interest in private lets.last_img read more

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Dell Names Chief Diversity and Inclusion Officer

first_imgInclusivity is the cornerstone of our culture at Dell. Embracing the unique perspectives of our 140,000 employees around the world not only makes for a welcoming workplace where our teams thrive, but we’re also able to better serve our entire customer base by reflecting their diverse perspectives. Put simply, a diverse range of ideas, perspectives and experience drives innovation, and so when we cultivate a culture of inclusivity, both our employees and our customers win.Earlier this month, we celebrated the one year anniversary of Dell’s combination with EMC by reflecting on our achievements over the past year, including our commitments to a diverse and inclusive workforce. We build on our commitment to a culture of inclusion today with the announcement of Brian Reaves as Dell’s Chief Diversity and Inclusion Officer.An experienced technology executive with a track record of success in advancing diversity and inclusion within the technology industry, Brian joins us from SAP, where he most recently led the development and implementation of diversity and inclusion initiatives across the company. Over the past 30 years, Brian has driven business and technology innovation as an engineer, executive and diverse leader at both established companies and start-ups. His perspective on diversity and inclusion in relation to customer innovation and business value will have a tremendous impact on our company and industry.Brian’s leadership will further Dell’s rich history of celebrating diversity and promoting inclusion. Brian will partner with leaders and employees across Dell to continue our internal commitments, including our 34,000 strong Employee Resource Group (ERG) community and our program to engage leaders in candid conversations about the role of gender and diversity in the workplace. He will also build upon our external commitments, including partnering with our global operations team on our supplier diversity program, which sees Dell spend more than $4 billion a year with certified women-owned, minority-owned suppliers and small businesses, as well as our industry partnerships with leading groups including the Human Rights Campaign, Catalyst, Black Enterprise, the Anita Borg Institute (ABI) and The Partnership. Brian has the enthusiastic support of Dell’s entire leadership team to drive programs and initiatives that will make meaningful impact to both our employees and customers.Dell was founded with the purpose to drive human progress through the power of technology. We strive to fulfill that purpose each day by embracing all people, opportunities and ideas through a diverse workforce and culture of inclusion.last_img read more

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State agency bungles ballot referendum for child sex victims

first_imgHARRISBURG, Pa. (AP) — Victims of child sexual abuse might have to wait two years or more to pursue legal claims because of a major bureaucratic bungle that prompted angry denunciations across the political spectrum and the resignation of a top Pennsylvania state official. The Wolf administration disclosed Monday that a proposed state constitutional amendment allowing lawsuits over decadesold claims wasn’t advertised as required and so cannot appear on the ballot this spring. As a result, no statewide referendum to add it to the state constitution may be possible before 2023. The Department of State is calling it “simple human error” and Gov. Tom Wolf is apologizing.last_img read more

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New COVID-19 Case Reported In Cattaragus County

first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) MGN ImageLITTLE VALLEY – One new case of COVID-19 was reported in Cattaragus County on Saturday. The County Health Department says the new case is a female healthcare worker who lives in the northwest part of the county.Officials say she developed cough, sore throat, whole body aches and headaches.The department has now begun a contact tracing investigation. There are now a total of 48 confirmed COVID-19 cases with 15 active and 31 recovered.Meanwhile in Chautauqua County, there were no new cases of COVID-19 reported on Saturday.There remain 42 confirmed cases, 6 active, 32 recovered and 4 deaths related to the outbreak.last_img read more

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Best Kids’ Gear: Trail-Tested Favorites

first_imgIf you add them all together, the Blue Ridge Outdoors staff has approximately 158 children, ranging in age from new newborns with that new baby smell to college kids who won’t talk to us anymore. So, we know a thing or two about outdoor gear for kids. Most of us have spent countless hours in the backcountry, micro-adjusting baby backpacks or applying Band-Aids to blistered feet because of ill-fitting boots. Here, some of the parents at the magazine talk about the best pieces of kid’s gear in their quiver.BOB Revolution Stroller | $460The BOB enabled my kids to experience the wild woods at an early age. The rugged tread and wheels handled even the rockiest adventures. The pouch beneath the seat carried water bottles and snacks—along with rocks, pine cones, and other kid souvenirs from our adventures. The BOB was equally useful in town, enabling me to run while pushing the stroller on pot-holed roads strewn with broken glass. The ride was so butter-smooth that my kids usually fell asleep. Hand-activated drum brakes always provided safe, reliable control. The BOB Revolution is a durable, dependable stroller that has withstood a decade of heavy outdoor use. —Will Harlan, Editor in ChiefMinishades Polarized Sunglasses | $20Nothing can ruin a fun family outing like grumpy kids complaining about the sun in their eyes. These kids’ sunglasses are cute, colorful, safe, and are polarized with 100% UV protection. These are the only pair of sunglasses that my friend’s son Porter will wear. They are so strong and flexible that he can’t break them, and they are so lightweight that he doesn’t mind wearing them. I feel good about protecting his eyes, especially at the beach and lake where the sun is powerful and reflecting off the water.  —Martha Evans, Senior Account ExecutiveENO Indio Daypack | $50My son (8) loves his ENO Indio daypack. He carries it with him just about everywhere. It’s great for hikes and kid essentials when out in the woods (such as elaborate LEGO contraptions and NERF guns). The outer bungee straps make stashing a jacket easy and accessible. He also uses it as a school backpack, because internal dividers provide enough organization, so it can pull double duty, which is important for any piece of kid’s gear.  —Dusty Allison, Digital PublisherDeuter Kid Comfort 3 | $300When we had our third little one I decided it was finally time to invest in a decent kid carrier. Previously I was using a cheap model found on Craigslist and my back was screaming at the end of every hike. While bulkier than other kid packs, the Kid Comfort 3 has a burly hip belt that actually keeps my chunky toddler in place while I’m trying to sidestep roots and rocks. It also has a padded backrest, which seems to keep my daughter happier for longer stretches. In this case, minimalism be damned. —Jedd Ferris, Senior EditorKeen Chandler CNX | $65We’ve outfitted our kids with nothing but Keens since they were old enough to walk. We buy a pair new for the oldest kid and they last forever, so we can hand them down to the younger siblings. My oldest (4) is wearing the Chandler CNX right now. They look burly, but they’re actually light and comfy enough for everyday use. They have a great sole, so they handle trails just fine too. I also like the drawstring system instead of laces, which saves a lot of time. Bonus: they’re also machine-washable. —Nick Noe, Sales ExecutiveBlack Diamond Wiz Kid Harness | $35Given half the chance, most kids will get into rock climbing. Luckily, there’s great kid’s climbing gear out there. Black Diamond takes the best features from their adult harnesses and shrinks them for kids. This thing is feather-light and incredibly comfortable…my kids will spend hours in it and never complain, which is a bit of a miracle. It’s also super adjustable so you can hang onto it as your kid grows. For shoes, we go with La Sportiva Stickit ($48), which offers great purchase on the rock, but are adjustable so they can grow with the kid as he/she moves from one size to the next. So you’ll get two years out of each pair, instead of just one. –Graham Averill, Gear Editorlast_img read more

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What Does DOJ Review of Police Settlements Mean for SCPD Reforms?

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York In the wake of the high-profile slaying of Ecuadorian immigrant Marcelo Lucero in November 2008 and accusations of discriminatory treatment of Hispanics, the beleaguered Suffolk County Police Department and the U.S. Department of Justice entered into a settlement agreement intended to foster much-needed policy changes within the department.Under the agreement, which the Suffolk County Legislature approved, federal monitoring of the agency potentially would’ve ceased after three years from its effective date, Jan. 13, 2014, had the department demonstrated improvements across the board. Three years later, however, the department remains tethered to the settlement despite it making “substantial progress” in implementing some of its requirements, according to the DOJ’s most recent assessment report, published on Jan. 19.Suffolk police achieved “substantial compliance” in the area of hate crimes and hate incidents training—subjects garnering much scrutiny before and after the Lucero murder.“In other areas,” the report stated, “considerable work remains.”One such area DOJ inspectors identified for improvement is the way in which the department collects traffic stop data. In its latest report, monitors noted that Suffolk police “omits critical variables that are necessary for meaningful analysis of bias-free policing,” including the reasons for initiating a traffic stop.Continued oversight of the department comes amid a March 21 memorandum issued by U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions to department heads and U.S. Attorneys across the country calling for a review of “compliance reviews, existing or contemplated consent decrees, and task force participation.”Court-mandated consent decrees compel offending agencies to comply with federal directives. Out of court agreements, such as that issued in Suffolk County, are essentially contracts between two parties. Nationwide, there are currently 14 consent decrees and four out-of-court settlements aimed at reforming troubled police departments. Perhaps the most notable Obama-era consent decree involves the Ferguson Police Department, which became ground zero for large anti-police brutality demonstrations following the fatal police shooting of 18-year-old Michael Brown.“All consent decrees currently in place would be subject to review” following Sessions’ memo, a DOJ official told the Press. Whether “review” means retreat from Obama administration policies remains unknown, though if Baltimore is any example—the DOJ under President Trump recently sought a delay in a consent decree stalling rehabilitation there—the latter is likely. Whether the review extends to the out-of-court settlement agreement between the DOJ and SCPD is also unclear.Without federal compulsion to implement the aforementioned improvements, it’d be up to Suffolk County Police Department brass to continue the progress initiated by the DOJ—directives imposed for a reason.“These aren’t taken on lightly,” explained John DeCarlo, assistant chair of the Department of Criminal Justice at the University of New Haven. “The DOJ doesn’t come in and say ‘Hey, we want to do a consent decree.’ They’re not picking on anyone.“They’re there because there are substantial problems,” he continued. “Sometimes it’s not within the capability of the local political system to make the changes needed.”Aside from the legal settlement, Suffolk police is under a long-standing consent decree related to its hiring practices, the same with neighboring Nassau County police. A Justice Department spokesman did not address the 2014 agreement specifically, but in a statement said the memo was issued at a time of “new leadership in the Department actively developing strategies to support the thousands of law enforcement agencies across the country that seek to prevent crime and protect the public.”“The Department is working to ensure that those initiatives effectively dovetail with robust enforcement of federal laws designed to preserve and protect civil rights,” the statement added. “While this memo includes the review of any pending consent decrees, the Attorney General also recognizes the Department’s important role helping communities and police departments achieve these goals.”Over the course of the agreement, SCPD welcomed a new commissioner, Tim Sini, who vowed to reform the agency after its former chief of department, James Burke, shamed the department. The disgraced ex-chief pleaded guilty last year to conspiracy charges stemming from a precinct beating of a shackled burglary suspect. The suspect, Christopher Loeb, stole a duffel bag from Burke’s SUV containing sex toys, porn, a gun, ammunition and other items. According to federal investigators, Burke, who was sentenced to 46 months in prison, orchestrated a coverup and attempted, but ultimately failed, to stymie the FBI’s investigation.As for Sini, the tall task of turning around a department embarrassed by scandal fell squarely on his shoulders. But at the same time, Sini had to mend the relationship with the FBI after Burke’s puzzling decision in 2012 to unceremoniously remove three detectives from the FBI’s Joint Long Island Gang Task Force, despite its resounding successes tackling violent local street gangs. The SCPD has since rejoined the collaborative unit, and Sini stood alongside DOJ officials and his local and state counterparts at a press conference in March announcing the arrest of 13 members of the MS-13 gang for seven murders and racketeering, among other alleged crimes.More relevant to the federal government’s scrutiny of the department was the arrest of Suffolk police Sgt. Scott Greene for stealing money from mostly Hispanic drivers. Greene’s arrest was announced 18 days after the settlement went into effect. Greene was eventually convicted of petty larceny, official misconduct and grand larceny, but acquitted on the most serious hate crimes charges.“I am particularly outraged by the conduct of this officer who was sworn to protect the community but instead targeted individuals who he perceived to be vulnerable,” former SCPD Commissioner Ed Webber said at the time.‘EPIDEMIC OF HATE CRIMES’This was all happening amid greater scrutiny of local law enforcement agencies nationwide under the Obama administration.From the time he came into office, former President Obama’s DOJ sued 14 police departments and agreed to four out-of-court agreements with four agencies, including Suffolk police, according to The New York Times. As evidenced by Sessions’ memo, the Trump administration is not expected to pursue oversight of local police departments as vigorously as his predecessor.In fact, they appear to be doing the opposite. Without explicitly stating in the memorandum his intention to roll back, or perhaps even squash such reforms, Sessions declared:“The Federal government alone can not successfully address rising crime rates, secure public safety, protect and respect the civil rights of all members of the public, or implement the best practices of policing. These are, first and foremost, tasks for state, local, and tribal law enforcement.”Among a list of ways to “effectively promote a peaceful and lawful society society, where the civil rights of all persons are valued and protected” ensure successful policing, Sessions’ memorandum states: “Local control and local accountability are necessary for effective local policing. It is not the responsibility of the federal government to manage non-federal law enforcement agencies.“The misdeeds of individual bad actors should not impugn or undermine the legitimate and honorable work that law enforcement officers and agencies perform in keeping American communities safe,” it continues.Sini, a former federal prosecutor who has been commissioner for 14 months, inherited a department plagued by the scandal-scarred Burke and accusations of discriminatory policing tracing back years.In November 2008, Latino Justice, an immigrant advocacy group, wrote a letter to the Civil Rights Division of the Justice Department detailing allegations of discriminatory policing in Suffolk. The letter was deeply critical of Suffolk County’s treatment of Latinos, going as far as declaring “an epidemic of hate crimes against Latinos had erupted in Suffolk County.”The DOJ first announced an investigation in 2009 after predatory teenagers viciously killed 37-year-old immigrant Marcelo Lucero in Patchogue, which brought Suffolk County into the national spotlight for all the wrong reasons. The Lucero slaying was predated by two similarly vicious attacks: the kidnapping and beating of two Latino men in Farmingville by white men posing as contractors in 2000, and the 2004 burning of a Latino family’s home. A climate of fear had enveloped the Hispanic community, advocates said, with many afraid to report crimes to the police because of their questionable immigration status or distrust of law enforcement.A Sept. 13, 2011, letter from the DOJ’s Civil Rights Division addressed to former Suffolk County Executive Steve Levy noted that it was investigating, among other allegations, that “SCPD engages in discriminatory policing, that its approach to the Latino community discourages Latino victims from filing complaints and cooperating with the police, and that the Department fails to investigate crimes and hate-crime incidents involving Latinos.”Two years later, the DOJ and Suffolk police agreed to the current settlement, which was negotiated out of court and included 29 reforms currently guiding changes within the department. The areas for improvement include bias-free policing, hate crimes and hate incidents, training, and language assistance.Even with allegations swirling against Greene for targeting Hispanics and the circus spawned by Burke’s cantankerous reign, the police department has managed to come into varying degrees of compliance since the DOJ stepped in.During a hearing before the Suffolk County Legislature’s Public Safety Committee last week, Sini told lawmakers that the department was in “compliance” with 28 of 29 of the recommendations. In reality, the police department has only achieved “partial compliance” with regards to 21 of the DOJ provisions, compared with seven such provisions in which monitors found the department to be in “substantial compliance.”According to the agreement, the DOJ assessment won’t be over until the county “has maintained substantial compliance with all provisions” for the previous 12 months. Sini indicated that he’s prepared to open discussions with the DOJ about “how to move forward.”Sini’s assessment aside, the DOJ’s January report suggested its mandate that SCPD achieve full compliance remained unchanged. The report was published one day before President Donald Trump’s inauguration. Sessions wasn’t confirmed as Attorney General until Feb. 8.SCPD MONITORING MOVES FORWARD“Over the coming year, we will focus our attention on the Department’s efforts in the substantive areas of the Agreement with which the Department remains in partial compliance,” the DOJ said in the Jan. 19 assessment, adding that it will release public reports on its observations in both the spring and fall of 2017. According to a law enforcement source close to the matter, members of the DOJ toured SCPD headquarters in Yaphank this month and recently held a meeting with members of the community—standard procedures for a compliance evaluation.A spokesperson for the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Eastern District declined to comment on Sini’s statements to the Pubic Safety Committee. A spokesman for Suffolk police did not respond to multiple requests for comment for this story. Following a request for response from the Press regarding inoperable links to the DOJ settlement on SCPD’s website, the hyperlinks were activated, though no explanation was provided. A former chief of the Branford Police Department in Connecticut, New Haven University’s DeCarlo has studied settlement agreements, and said it can take years for a department to come under full compliance. For example, the Detroit Police Department was under federal monitoring for 13 years before its consent decree expired last year. In the case of East Haven Police Department in Connecticut, federal monitors pulled out after the department met compliance standards after three years, explained DeCarlo.“They don’t have to be perfect and they don’t have to have 100-percent compliance, but they want to have movement,” DeCarlo told the Press, speaking broadly about settlement agreements. “The feds aren’t being unreasonable—and it’s all about policy, about changing your policy and changing the patterns and practices of what you’re doing. If you’re doing stuff that you’re not supposed to be doing or is not in the best interest of the community, they want you to change it.”DeCarlo reviewed the DOJ’s most recent assessment of the SCPD and said the recommendations do not appear to be unfair.“If the community is not happy with the cops, and the bias is perceived, then that’s bias,” DeCarlo said. “Whether you’re intending to do it or not, if you do not appear legitimate as a police department in the eyes of the community that you’re there to serve, then you’re biased.”DeCarlo noted that a successful transition from police department under scrutiny to one making serious reforms depends on not only the willingness of the agency to achieve its goals, but also backing from local officials. He said departments may perceive federal monitoring in a negative light at first, but taken retrospectively, settlement agreements could prove beneficial to the department—and the community it serves.“Change is hard, and police departments, like all pieces of government, are bureaucracies,” he said.Whether the DOJ under Sessions will unilaterally back out of the agreement remains to be seen. But if their intention is to give SCPD its independence, there may not be any obstacles to prevent them from doing so, said Christopher Dunn, associate legal director for the New York Civil Liberties Union.“If the DOJ was what prompted it, and they just walk away from it, that’s probably just the end of it,” said Dunn, speaking broadly about out-of-court agreements, as is the case in Suffolk.Joselo Lucero, Marcelo’s younger brother, said that a premature exit from the settlement agreement would be unwise considering increased anxiety among immigrants with fear of deportations under the new presidential administration.Lucero meets with both Suffolk police and the DOJ periodically. Among the foremost issues he discusses with the DOJ is language access, which the DOJ’s Jan. 19 report graded as in “partial compliance” and requiring further improvements.“I think it should continue,” Lucero, outreach coordinator at the nonprofit Hagedorn Foundation, told the Press. “I cannot tell you for how long, but until the community feels safe and feels comfortable to talk to the police…the fear to be arrested by immigration is a big issue right now.”In his conversations with Sini, Lucero was told that SCPD doesn’t recognize Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) detainer requests and only complies when a warrant for a particular person in custody has been issued.According to Suffolk police policy documents amended last April, non-US citizens cannot be detained “solely pursuant to a request from ICE” and “such detention shall only be conducted pursuant to a warrant.” As for how the administration now compares to the one in power when his brother was tragically killed, Lucero said the difference is stark.“If you go back 10 years ago, it was worse, really, it was worse against immigrants,” he said. “This administration has made progress.”In public, Sini has displayed an openness to work with the community. During press conferences related to the recent MS-13 slayings, he has reiterated that a person’s immigration status would not be impacted if they came forward with information about crimes. And during two press conferences about four bodies found in a Central Islip park, a Spanish-speaking interpreter was present to translate the commissioner’s comments.Sini also told the Suffolk County Legislature’s Public Safety Committee the department is making it easier for members of the Hispanic community to file complaints with Internal Affairs investigators. Doing so, he said, is good for transparency.Legis. Robert Trotta (R-Fort Salonga), a former Suffolk police detective and one-time member of the Long Island Gang Task Force, said the department had always been involved in community relations, but to a lesser extent than it is now.“I think the department is in a way better place than what it was,” Trotta said, attributing much of its rehabilitation to Burke’s downfall. “The bar was set so low that it’s doing much better. The guys are hard working, they’re trying to get the job done. There’s always a couple of bad apples in any bunch.”That the police department has been more engaged and is making progress is clear in the report. But, as the DOJ’s Jan. 19 assessment notes, there’s still more work to be done.If Lucero had it his way, the DOJ-led monitoring would continue until the department met all its requirements.“I don’t see why they have to finish with this settlement, especially now, when the community is under attack,” he said.last_img read more

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