NOLA Musicians Help Sway City Council To Unanimously Pass Marijuana Reform Legislation

first_imgIn a unanimous voting, the New Orleans City Council has voted 7-0 in favor of supporting reformed legislation on marijuana. The new policies allow officers to issue citations for marijuana possession, as opposed to making arrests or issuing summons to offenders. For first-time offenders, the fine is only $40; a large step up from time spent in a holding cell and/or in court.While officers still have the right to arrest offenders, this new leniency will greatly reduce the number of non-violent drug offenders in the city of New Orleans. The new policy received some staunch report from local New Orleans musicians, including a long list of legends. Kermit Ruffins, Phil Frazier (Rebirth Brass Band), Terrence Houston, Billy Iuso, KC O’Rorke (Flow Tribe), Papa Mali, Eric “Benny” Bloom, Tom McDermott, Meschiya Lake and more all came out in support.“We are are extremely impressed that all seven councilmembers supported this common sense marijuana reform,” said Kevin Caldwell, Executive Director of CommonsenseNOLA, in a piece published on OffBeat Magazine about the vote. “It’s a great day for the City of New Orleans.”This is definitely a step in the right direction, and a great win for the people of New Orleans.last_img read more

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From farms to tables

first_img 14Inside Somerville’s Union Square Donuts, the mood is fun, like its gigantic crave-worthy maple bacon doughnuts. 6Carrots get rinsed before being boxed for that day’s farmers’ market. 16Sarah Willis (from left) and Hillary Brown roll pastry dough inside the kitchen. Their work typically starts around 4 a.m. 3On a harvest morning, Dave Purpura directs workers Ron Aakjar (left) and Tim Birnstiel. 1Farmer Dave Purpura named his Middleboro, Mass., farm Plato’s Harvest after his beloved pet goat. 10Anyone can take a tour of Taza’s Somerville factory. Here, tour leader Krysia Villon explains the three-day production process, which includes grinding cacao beans and wrapping the chocolate. 5Dave Purpura steps in the pen to feed — and pet — his pigs. If there’s anything more delicious than a newly picked, vine-ripened tomato or fresh golden corn, it surely must be chocolate or a sticky, carb-laden confection. All are available at the Harvard Farmers’ Market, held weekly at the Science Center Plaza and in Allston. But their origins may surprise you.Knowing where food comes from has never been more important in an age of global commerce and public debates over factory farming and genetically modified foods. This ethos is part of the farm-to-table movement, which emphasizes local foods such as those sold by the farms and vendors that serve the Harvard Farmers’ Market.Taza Chocolate is one such vendor. Producing circles of stoneground chocolate in nearby Somerville, Taza is committed to sustainability, even as it sources cocoa beans from Bolivia, Belize, and the Dominican Republic. By dealing in direct trade with certified organic farms in these countries without a middleman, Taza can pay cocoa farmers well above market wage. The beans head straight to Somerville, where they’re turned into chocolate.Right down the road at Union Square Donuts, production workers arrive at the break of dawn, ready to hand-roll, cut, fry, and glaze fresh doughnuts before most people have even hit the snooze button. They work mostly in silence, save for the noise from a radio and the phone, which rarely stops ringing. A good doughnut is hard to find.Farther off, in Middleboro, Mass., roosters signal another day on the farm for Dave Purpura, who rents his acreage for Plato’s Harvest Organic Farm. The former software engineer has been farming for nearly a decade. He and a few farmhands transport the day’s harvest to Purpura’s home, where it’s rinsed and boxed before it’s sent to farmers markets.The tableau of animals, cornstalks, and countrymen makes for a cinematic, even romantic, view. “Everyone thinks that until they get out here for a few hours, and it’s 90 degrees, and the romance goes out the window,” said Purpura. It’s hard work that makes a farm work.Additional reporting by Crystal Chandler. 19Fresh-cut doughnuts, ready for the sputtering oil. 4Ron Aakjar plucks squashes for the day’s farmers’ markets. 2Chickens graze between the rows of produce at Plato’s Harvest. 11Taza’s chocolate is an organic, vegan, dairy- and gluten-free treat. 7Tim Birnstiel shakes off some greens. 18Production manager Kristen Rummel counts and boxes doughnuts intended for afternoon’s farmers markets. 17Paige Degeorge (from left) and Dominic Dellaquila work on a batch of doughnuts. 15Union Square Donuts co-owner and pastry chef Heather Schmidt tapes up the week’s farmers’ market schedule. 20Sarah Willis strikes an artful balance carrying doughnuts to the walk-in fridge to chill. 8Founded in 2006, Taza specializes in Mexican-style chocolate. 9Taza participates in direct trade with organic cocoa farmers in Bolivia, Belize, and the Dominican Republic. Although not used in chocolate production, shells from the beans can be used for tea, mulch, and as a natural termite repellant. 13Taza employees prepare the final product for wrapping. 12Using stone mills instead of steel mills like most chocolate on the market gives Taza products a unique, grainy texture. last_img read more

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County Launches Website For Promoting Local Businesses As Pandemic Continues

first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) A small business owner places an open sign in his window. Photo: USAFJAMESTOWN – Chautauqua County business officials announced Thursday that they’ve launched a new website geared towards promoting local restaurants and retail businesses who are still providing services amid the ongoing Coronavirus pandemic.  The Chautauqua County Visitors Bureau, the Chautauqua County Chamber of Commerce, the County of Chautauqua Industrial Development Agency, and the Jamestown Renaissance Corporation say a list of restaurants operating can be found on CHQbuylocal.com. They say businesses are managing takeout and deliver services, and are also trying different modes of operation.The website will initially contain a full list of restaurants that are offering takeout or delivery food services as well as links to their websites and/or social media pages. Restaurant owners can also utilize a fillable form on the site to ensure their business is included.“As long as you remain in good health, maintain social distancing, good hygiene, and common sense, there’s still a lot of things to do and essential services available in Chautauqua County,” said County Executive Paul Wendel Jr. “Please support our local restaurants and small businesses and order some take out or buy a gift card.” Officials urge caution in all transactions. Some businesses are taking orders and payments by phone with credit card payment. They also urge people to always call ahead to place takeout orders and tip generously. This situation is changing daily and some food service providers may have to make rapid changes in their plans.“We encourage the public to continue to support local businesses by safely patronizing their establishments,” said Todd Tranum, CEO of the Chautauqua County Chamber of Commerce. “In addition to directly buying services and products the public should make an effort to buy gift cards. Every purchase makes a difference for these small businesses. Please keep promoting our local establishments on your social media pages. Shop safe! Shop small! Shop local!”last_img read more

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Amazon Prime Day is coming: Will your card be top of wallet?

first_img continue reading » ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr From July 15th to 16th, consumers around the globe will flock to Amazon to take advantage of the digital retailer’s fifth-ever Prime Day. Promising a “two-day parade of epic deals,” Amazon and its retail partners stand to win big, with transactions expected to reach over $1 billion. Card issuers also win big during Prime Day; last year, the number of Prime Day transactions inside the CO-OP credit card portfolio saw a 41-percent jump compared to the previous year, and we expect the trend to continue this year. (We’ll be sharing the data from this year’s Prime Day in a few weeks – stay tuned!)Thanks to the rapid rise of e-commerce and the success of online shopping events like Amazon Prime Day and Cyber Monday, the competition for the default card spot on digital transactions has increased significantly. Particularly with Amazon, which leverages its patented “1-Click ordering” feature to allow consumers to bypass the checkout process almost entirely, card issuers, retailers and even Amazon itself are competing to land their cards in the default position. They do this through a combination of targeted campaigns, special rewards and cash-back offers. Target, for example, is offering its closed-loop cardholders an extra 5-percent cash back for online purchases made during the 2-day Prime window. This is on top of the 5-percent they already get.Credit union card issuers are getting in the game, too. Several of CO-OP’s most progressive credit unions already are offering really exciting perks to Prime Day shoppers. In partnership with our SmartGrowth Consultant Services team, credit union card issuers have launched special rewards campaigns to encourage members to set their credit union card as the default payment, not only in Amazon but other e-commerce retailers, as well.last_img read more

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Only way is up

first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img

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MWB in data centre joint deal

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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Friendly locals and open spaces more than enough to keep Pete happy at Gordonvale

first_imgPeter Noonan of Gordonvale. PICTURE: BRENDAN RADKEDRINKING tea on the veranda of his semirural property, which takes in mountain views, is still a treat for Peter Noonan. City living has never appealed to the retired schoolteacher, who about 25 years ago settled in Gordonvale with his wife Janet and their children.“I used to work at St Mary’s Catholic College, and back then people were amazed that I lived in Gordonvale and drove in to work every day at Woree,” Mr Noonan said. “Why would I want to live in Cairns, when I can look out from my home to mountains and Walsh’s Pyramid?”The rural community, 23km from Cairns, remains closely knit.“I’ve been here for 25 years, but in some ways I’m still a newbie,” Mr Noonan said.“You walk into the shops here and get that ‘country nod’ when someone recognises you.“You never feel threatened in Gordonvale; it’s just not in the nature of the place.”In his retirement Mr Noonan, who lives on a 1ha property on Dempsey St, has become involved with the Gordonvale Men’s Shed and Mulgrave Settlers’ Museum.More from newsCairns home ticks popular internet search terms3 days agoTen auction results from ‘active’ weekend in Cairns3 days ago“There’s a nice history to the town, which still has a village-feel to it,” the 67-year-old said.Affordable, larger blocks are making Gordonvale an increasingly popular choice for young families and first homeowners.According to CoreLogic, median house prices in the community ($335,000) increased by 12 per cent over the five years to December. Ray White Cairns South principal Therese Plath said Gordonvale property prices would rise, with interest growing in the land-rich city’s south.“We’re finding people living on the Southside, more in suburbia, are looking at going to acreage and larger blocks so their kids have more room to play,” she said. “The prices will increase; Gordonvale has certainly not reached its peak.”The town was first known as Nelson and, after a host of other names, became Gordonvale in January 1914.According to Cairns Regional Council, it was named after well-known local butcher and councillor John Gordon.last_img read more

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Bibby HydroMap Expands Asset Inspection Services

first_imgBibby HydroMap has expanded its asset inspection survey technology with the purchase of the Carlson Software Merlin LiDAR mapping system. The Merlin LiDAR system will complement the existing marine and terrestrial survey equipment to deliver improved high-resolution datasets of objects of interest, with the aim of enhancing the validity of asset inspection services, the company explained.The new system is a vessel-based 3D mobile marine laser scanner system, designed to integrate with existing hydrographic equipment, therefore allowing simultaneous data acquisition above and below the waterline.Bibby HydroMap’s inshore vessel Eagle is currently equipped with the new system and can be rapidly mobilized with all other asset inspection equipment to reduce deployment timescales, the company noted.“The Merlin LiDAR system is the specialist’s tool for marine based LiDAR data acquisition. It’s simple, robust, marinized design affords quick, repeatable mobilizations along with the confidence that the equipment can handle the environmental conditions expected from European coastlines. Coupled with its use of industry leading sensor components and its compatibility with standard hydrographic acquisition packages, the Merlin LiDAR allows Bibby HydroMap to offer a high quality turnkey ‘above-surface’ solution to our clients, and complements our existing offerings of traditional bathymetric, geophysical, geotechnical and sub-surface scanning products,” said Nick Bowley, senior surveyor at Bibby HydroMap.last_img read more

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Grave threat suspect falls

first_imgThe suspect was detained in the lockupfacility of the San Dionisio municipal police station. The 33-year-old resident Stephine JohnRedosendo was caught on the strength of an arrest warrant around 3:30 p.m. onOct. 28, a police report showed.  ILOILO City – A man was arrested forgrave threats in Barangay Canas, San Dionisio, Iloilo.center_img The court recommended a P3,000 bailbond for Redosendo’s temporary liberty./PNlast_img

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Clara Jean Johnson age, 66

first_imgClara Jean Johnson, age 66, of Brookville, Indiana died Friday, August 19, 2016 at her residence in Brookville.Born July 16, 1950 in Waco, Texas she was the daughter of the late Clarence H. & Mattie M. (Dennis) Taylor. On August 13, 1966 she became the wife of Ronald M. Johnson and he survives. A homemaker, her greatest joy in life was her family and she enjoyed caring for them. Besides Ronald, her husband of 50 years, survivors include four children, John (Kym) Johnson of Spring, Texas, Pamela Fanestiel of Brookville, Indiana, Steven (Heather) Johnson of Conroe, Texas and Bryan (Joni) Johnson of Brookville, Indiana; six grandchildren, Christine Fanestiel, William Fanestiel, Joshua Johnson, Zachary Johnson, Natalie Johnson and Lucas Johnson; one sister, Kay Jordan of Yellville, Arkansas; three brothers, Raymond Taylor, David Taylor and Robert Taylor all of Conroe, Texas. In addition to her parents, she was greeted in heaven by a sister Janette Martin, and a granddaughter, Katelyn Reese Johnson who died February 22, 2013. Pastor Justin Bradley of Red Life Church will officiate the Funeral Services on Tuesday, August 23, 2016, 12:00 Noon, at Phillips & Meyers Funeral Home, 1025 Franklin Avenue, Brookville. Family & friends may visit from 11:00 A.M. until the time of the services at 12:00 Noon on Tuesday, August 23, at the Funeral Home. Memorial contributions may be directed to the McCullough Hyde Memorial Hospital Foundation. Phillips & Meyers Funeral Home is honored to serve the Johnson family, to sign the online guest book or send personal condolences please visit www.phillipsandmeyers.com .last_img read more

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