The demographics and economics behind hunger

first_imgTCU places second in the National Student Advertising Competition, the highest in school history Haeven Gibbonshttps://www.tcu360.com/author/haeven-gibbons/ Welcome TCU Class of 2025 Linkedin Previous articleHoroscope: January 26, 2021Next articleHoroscope: January 27, 2021 Haeven Gibbons Twitter Haeven Gibbonshttps://www.tcu360.com/author/haeven-gibbons/ Image Magazine: Spring 2021 Haeven Gibbonshttps://www.tcu360.com/author/haeven-gibbons/ Linkedin Haeven Gibbons Facebook Facebook RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR World Oceans Day shines spotlight on marine plastic pollution Vintage fever: Fort Worth residents and vintage connoisseurs talk about their passion for thrifting Grains to grocery: One bread maker brings together farmers and artisans at locally-sourced store ReddIt NewsCommunityIn-depth reportingMultimediaTop StoriesThe demographics and economics behind hungerBy Haeven Gibbons – January 26, 2021 1305 Twitter printThe 76114CISD adapts meal plans amid pandemicChildren and hungerEconomics of hungerThe demographics and economics behind hungerHunger in America: Part 2By Haeven Gibbons(AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin)(AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin)This report was compiled using reporting done by students enrolled in JOUR 30204 035/065, fall semester 2020. Working in teams, students explored the issue of hunger in America through the Fault Lines of class, generation, geography, gender, sexual orientation and race. They focused on Tarrant County, Texas.  The classes included: Charles Baggarly, Leah Bolling, Molly Boyce, Haley Cabrera, Connor Cash, Brian Contreras, Cole DeLuca, Larry Flores, Kaitlyn Freetag, Caroline Garland, Andre Giammattei, Haeven Gibbons, Logan Gibbs, Kiana Giddings, Stephanie Joynt, Ben Kasper, Samantha Knapp, Molly Kuhl, Shaina Looker, Lucie Lundquist, Hailey Lyon, Derek Lytle, Cole Marchi, Morgan McBride, Angelica Menjivar, Raines Nagel, Tyresa Oluyide, Joey Palmeri, Collin Pittman, Colin Post, Braden Roux, Oscar Saravia, Matthew Sgroi, Asia Soliday, Branisha Spincer, Sophia Stellas, Charlotte Tomlinson, Sophia Vandewark.Hunger tends to saturate specific zip codes within counties. In Tarrant County, 76114, or the city of River Oaks, experiences hunger at a disproportionate rate to its neighbors. Castleberry Independent School District is located in River Oaks and has an 80% reliance on free or reduced lunch programs. The state average is 62%.The reliance on free or reduced lunches in CISD correlates with the demographics of River Oaks, one of the few areas within Tarrant County with a poverty rate above 10%.The city’s median yearly income of $51,840 also falls below the Tarrant County average of  $64,874.The percentage of Latinx/Hispanic residents in River Oaks – 49.3% – is more extensive than state and county percentages of Latinx/Hispanic populations of 39.7% and 29.5%.Approximately 80% of the elementary schools’ student enrollment in CISD is made up of Latinx/Hispanic people who moved to River Oaks over the last 20 years.Many of the people who have moved to River Oaks have started a family and therefore have children attending schools within CISD.    As the demographics show, impoverished Hispanic areas of River Oaks make up the largest enrollment and free and reduced lunch percentages of CISD schools, and so do single mother households. Joel Berg, the CEO of Hunger Free America, a national nonprofit organization working to implement policies ending hunger, said the “hungriest houses” are headed by single women. “In general, women have higher poverty rates,” Berg said. “We run the national hunger hotline on behalf of USDA where people from around the country call and ask for information about how they can get charitable food or government food. Something like 80-90% of the callers are female.”The U.S. Census reported that 50.3% of the population in River Oaks is female, and 54.3% of these women above 16 years old are in the workforce, which contributes to their hunger disparity.Berg also commented on the disproportionality of women’s pay in the workforce compared to men. He said that some women who “have identical jobs as men… are paid less” or are “more likely to be in professions that overall pay less.”According to The North Central Texas Council of Governments, River Oaks has one of the top percentages of women-headed households in the state.  Overall, a higher percentage of women-headed households in a community can indicate a greater risk of poverty and economic instability in families. More instability contributes to the reliance on free and reduced lunches for children. Photo 1&3- (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)Photo 2- (AP Photo/Jessie Wardarski)Like the influx of women-headed households in River Oaks, low rates of educational degrees also contribute to hungry homes.In River Oaks, 76.4% of people over 25 have a high-school diploma, but just13.2% of people over 25 have a bachelor’s degree or higher. Both of these figures fall below the state averages of 83% and 29% respectively.  Fifty-six percent of jobs in Texas require postsecondary education, according to the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce. Subsequently, finding employment is challenging for the high percentage of River Oaks people with no such degrees, and household provisions are compromised. CISD’s demographic has a statistically higher rate of impoverishment than the Texas average. Because of this, the district provides free and reduced lunches for a large sum of its enrolled students. This community is evidence of the disproportionate rate at which women and children experience hunger. Briana Dominguez, center, sits with her sons, Noah Scott, 4, left, and Nehemiah Powell, 14, for a portrait inside their their Skokie, Ill., apartment with groceries she received at the Hillside Food Pantry. After her employer eliminated her job, the family is moving to Georgia where living costs are lower. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)Briana Dominguez, center, sits with her sons, Noah Scott, 4, left, and Nehemiah Powell, 14, for a portrait inside their their Skokie, Ill., apartment with groceries she received at the Hillside Food Pantry. After her employer eliminated her job, the family is moving to Georgia where living costs are lower. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)From left, Abigail Leocadio, stands with her children, Areli, 9, Eliel, 12, Zeret, 10, and Samai, 15, after a delivery from the Emmaus House food pantry Saturday, Nov. 14, 2020, in Phoenix. Leocadio says the food provides less than half of what her family eats in four weeks, but significantly reduces their monthly bill. Before the pandemic, the family was saving to buy a house, but that money has been wiped out. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin)Silvia De Leon pours a handmade salsa into a pot of chicken after returning home from a local church food pantry in Noel, Mo., Saturday, Nov. 21, 2020. After contracting the coronavirus in late June, De Leon was unable to work and her medical bills mounted. For the past five months, she has utilized the pantry every week to sustain the household she shares with her retired husband. (AP Photo/Jessie Wardarski)From left, Abigail Leocadio, stands with her children, Areli, 9, Eliel, 12, Zeret, 10, and Samai, 15, after a delivery from the Emmaus House food pantry Saturday, Nov. 14, 2020, in Phoenix. Leocadio says the food provides less than half of what her family eats in four weeks, but significantly reduces their monthly bill. Before the pandemic, the family was saving to buy a house, but that money has been wiped out. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin)Silvia De Leon pours a handmade salsa into a pot of chicken after returning home from a local church food pantry in Noel, Mo., Saturday, Nov. 21, 2020. After contracting the coronavirus in late June, De Leon was unable to work and her medical bills mounted. For the past five months, she has utilized the pantry every week to sustain the household she shares with her retired husband. (AP Photo/Jessie Wardarski)CISD adapts meal plans amid pandemic(AP Photo/Matt York,File)(AP Photo/Matt York,File)The elementary schools of Castleberry Independent School District — Castleberry Elementary School, A.V. Cato Elementary School and Joy James Elementary — have adjusted their meal plans amid the COVID-19 pandemic. Kayla Lynn, the school nutrition director for CISD, highlighted the drop in meal services that occurred when schools began shutting down in March. “In March when things were shut down, we were doing about 900 meals a day for remote meals, versus the previous March when everyone was on campus, where we were doing about 2,700 lunches per day,” Lynn said. “So to go from that to 900 a day, it’s a really big difference.”CISD elementary schools changed their reduced lunch policies after the Texas state-mandated lockdown that began on April 2.  As a result, parents were required to drive to campus to pick up the free and reduced meals. Photo: Amid concerns of the spread of COVID-19, a family picks up school lunches served out of a school bus at an apartment complex in Dallas, Tuesday, May 5, 2020. The Richardson ISD school lunch program is meeting the needs of students in Dallas County by distributing daily lunches at different apartments and school locations. According to this site manager, 200-250 meals are distributed daily at this apartment complex. (AP Photo/LM Otero)Lynn said this caused issues, as parents did not come to campus to pick up food and had problems with the district’s identification policy.”If students were not in the car with you when you came to pick up the meals, you had to have an ID that proved you had those kids to get the meals,” said Lynn. “That was somewhat of a challenge because parents didn’t understand why they had to prove that they had five kids at home.”Despite the students’ return to campus on Sept. 8, CISD decided to continue free meal provisions for students who request or need them. Meals include breakfast, lunch and dinner. Photo: Amid concerns of the spread of COVID-19, brothers Brian, left, and David Rayo wear masks as they pick up school lunches for themselves and other siblings at their apartment complex in Dallas, Tuesday, May 5, 2020. The Richardson ISD school lunch program is meeting the needs of students in Dallas County by distributing daily lunches at different apartments and school locations. According to this site manager, 200-250 meals are distributed daily at this apartment complex. (AP Photo/LM Otero)The pandemic has given CISD more policy flexibility toward free and reduced meals.In the past, enrichment programs were the only means by which students could access free meals after school. “There used to be a lot of requirements you had to meet to access the supper program,” said Lynn. “It used to be through an enrichment program like tutoring or a club or sports on campus.”Now, students have the option to complete enrichment programs at home for free supper access.”We are serving about 1000-1200 more suppers than last year just mainly on being able to send home the enrichment activity with the student,” said Lynn. “They can then do that at home and have the supper at home as well.” The free supper program is accessible for students until the end of the 2020-2021 academic year in June. The district will decide whether to keep the free lunches for the 2021-2022 school year based on the severity of COVID-19 at that time, but hopes of flexibility on lunch policies remain.DeAnne Page, executive director of finance for CISD, said these programs have proved beneficial for students who cannot afford enrichment programs like tutoring. “From my perspective, we would love to see it if USDA would give us that flexibility because we have two elementary schools that are 90% free and reduced, so that’s pretty high,” said Page. “Those students need something, and maybe they don’t have a way that they can stay after school for tutoring for whatever reason.”Lynn said she hopes the supper program will continue for students who cannot physically stay after school, but once COVID-19 regulations are gone, she said she doesn’t know if that will be a possibility. Children and hunger(AP Photo/Richard Shiro)(AP Photo/Richard Shiro)The face of hunger has changed with the decades, but for children, it has been a longtime battle.The 1960s in particular showed the struggles that some children faced with getting enough food.  A study by a team of doctors in 1967 highlighted children’s hunger in Mississippi. “We saw homes with children who are lucky to eat one meal a day,” the report read. “We saw children who don’t get to drink milk, don’t get to eat fruit, green vegetables or meat… We don’t want to quibble over the words but ‘malnutrition’ is not quite what we found… They are suffering from hunger and disease and directly or indirectly they are dying from them – which is exactly what ‘starvation’ means.”One of the turning points in the fight against child hunger came after the release of a CBS television documentary called “Hunger in America.” One of the most powerful scenes of the documentary portrays a young boy who was ashamed of having no money to buy food in school.The late Sen. George McGovern, D-South Dakota, summarized what some felt when they watched the documentary.  “You know, it’s not that little boy who should be ashamed; it’s George McGovern, a United States Senator, a member of the Committee on Agriculture,” he said. Former President Richard Nixon also became one of the figures that joined the fight against hunger. He committed to provide free or reduced-price lunches for children in schools and created the Food and Nutrition Service division of the USDA. Entering the 1970s, Nixon’s plan saw the number of children receiving free or reduced-price meals double. “That hunger and malnutrition should persist in a land such as ours is embarrassing and intolerable,” he said in a message to Congress in 1969. Nixon didn’t stop with child hunger. The food stamp program he helped pass in 1969 increased the number of people benefitting from food stamps from 3 million to 15 million over the span of four years. Jayden Messick, 9, helps his parents, Brian and Airis Messick, prepare lunch at their apartment in Anchorage, Alaska, on Wednesday, Nov. 11, 2020. The Messicks have had to turn to food banks after both lost their jobs in the economic downturn caused by the coronavirus pandemic. Airris, who just turned 30, found work in August, ironically, at the state unemployment office. “I hear people’s stories all day,” she says. “I listen to moms cry about not having money to take care of their kids. My heart aches for the people who get denied.” (AP Photo/Mark Thiessen)Airis Messick, left, and Brian Messick, right, eat lunch with this 9-year-old son, Jayden, at their apartment in Anchorage, Alaska, on Wednesday, Nov. 11, 2020. (AP Photo/Mark Thiessen)Aaron Crawford, his wife Sheyla and their sons, Sornic, left, and Gabriel, stand for a photograph outside their Apple Valley, Minn., home on Saturday, Nov. 21, 2020. The couple turned to a Minnesota nonprofit, 360 Communities, part of Feeding America’s food bank network, when the pandemic’s economic fallout put them in peril. The couple and their two young sons are among the millions who’ve flocked to food banks as hunger has reached record levels since the virus took hold in America. The Crawfords are now getting aid from federal food stamps. (AP Photo/Jim Mone)Jayden Messick, 9, helps his parents, Brian and Airis Messick, prepare lunch at their apartment in Anchorage, Alaska, on Wednesday, Nov. 11, 2020. The Messicks have had to turn to food banks after both lost their jobs in the economic downturn caused by the coronavirus pandemic. Airris, who just turned 30, found work in August, ironically, at the state unemployment office. “I hear people’s stories all day,” she says. “I listen to moms cry about not having money to take care of their kids. My heart aches for the people who get denied.” (AP Photo/Mark Thiessen)Airis Messick, left, and Brian Messick, right, eat lunch with this 9-year-old son, Jayden, at their apartment in Anchorage, Alaska, on Wednesday, Nov. 11, 2020. (AP Photo/Mark Thiessen)Aaron Crawford, his wife Sheyla and their sons, Sornic, left, and Gabriel, stand for a photograph outside their Apple Valley, Minn., home on Saturday, Nov. 21, 2020. The couple turned to a Minnesota nonprofit, 360 Communities, part of Feeding America’s food bank network, when the pandemic’s economic fallout put them in peril. The couple and their two young sons are among the millions who’ve flocked to food banks as hunger has reached record levels since the virus took hold in America. The Crawfords are now getting aid from federal food stamps. (AP Photo/Jim Mone)Economics of hungerNixon’s success was followed by a series of policies in the 1980s that some believe contributed to the modern hunger crisis rather than helping fix it. The administration and policies of Ronald Reagan in particular is seen by Berg as a catalyst in the hunger crisis.  Reagan’s trademark trickle-down economics plan had a negative domino effect on the economy. By making minimum wages lower and decreasing taxes on companies and corporations, the administration created a large wealth gap. This is what caused the ’80s to have a massive hunger deficit with effects that are still felt today. Photo: Phyllis Marder walks to her garage in the cold weather for her weekly trip Wednesday, Nov. 11, 2020, to the Hillside Food Pantry in Evanston, Ill. At first, Marder, 66, didn’t tell anyone about going to food pantries. Then she had a change of heart. “Keeping a secret makes things get worse,” she says ‘”… and makes me feel worse about myself, and so I decided that it was more important to talk about it.” (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)Joel Berg on the importance of higher wages:Haeven G · Joel Berg on the importance of higher wages“We really created the modern hunger and homelessness crisis,” Berg said when talking about the Reagan administration’s effect on hunger. While federal programs such as SNAP and WIC can help assist food insecure people, hunger will continue in America until larger changes are made, said Berg.“The most important things are higher wage jobs and more affordable housing, health care and childcare,” Berg said. “Between the high cost of living, the low wages and the inadequate safety net, those are the main causes of the problem.”  Source: The Century Foundation; Chart: William M. Rodgers IIISource: The Century Foundation; Chart: William M. Rodgers IIIIn the early 1990s, President Bill Clinton’s budget and economic plan changed the economic landscape and in turn, the hunger issue in America.“Clinton had the greatest economic growth in modern American history,” Berg said. This led to a decline in hunger through the ’90s and early 2000s. While hunger didn’t go away, some of its lowest rates were seen during this era.The trend took another turn when the Great Recession occurred in 2008. The economic downfall and corresponding unemployment spike increased America’s hunger problem. “When the economies collapse you are going to see a lot more hunger no matter what you do,” Berg said.Policies by President Obama slowly helped fix the spike caused by the Great Recession – and then the COVID-19 pandemic hit. Phyllis Marder prepares to head out in the cold weather for her weekly trip Wednesday, Nov. 11, 2020, to the Hillside Food Pantry in Evanston, Ill. At first, Marder, 66, didn’t tell anyone about going to food pantries. Then she had a change of heart. “Keeping a secret makes things get worse,” she says ‘”… and makes me feel worse about myself, and so I decided that it was more important to talk about it.” (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)Nehemiah Powell, 14, sips on a drink Saturday, Nov. 21, 2020, as a volunteer at the Hillside Food Pantry social distances while he loads a bag of groceries into the family car in Evanston, Ill. After her employer eliminated her job, the family is moving to Georgia where living costs are lower. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)Noah Scott, 4, sits on the shoulders of his brother Nehemiah Powell, 14, Saturday, Nov. 21, 2020, as Powell labels a packed moving box in their Skokie, Ill., apartment. After her employer eliminated her job, the family is moving to Georgia where living costs are lower. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)Norman Butler, a first time food bank user, and his girlfriend Cheryl Butler wait overnight in their car, along with others lined up to receive food at a distribution point in Metairie, La., Thursday, Nov. 19, 2020. Before the pandemic, Norman, 53, flourished in the tourism-dominated city, working as an airport shuttle and limousine driver, a valet and hotel doorman. Since March when the normally bustling streets turned silent, the only work he’s had has been as an Uber driver. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)Larry Holt, left, thanks Diana Everett after she delivered a box of food to his apartment, Thursday, Nov. 19, 2020, in Las Vegas. Holt lost his casino job during the coronavirus pandemic and receives assistance from a food bank. (AP Photo/John Locher)Norman Butler unboxes food that he received at a food distribution point, in his apartment, after waiting in line overnight, in New Orleans, Thursday, Nov. 19, 2020. Before the pandemic, Butler, 53, flourished in the tourism-dominated city, working as an airport shuttle and limousine driver, a valet and hotel doorman. Since March when the normally bustling streets turned silent, the only work he’s had has been as an Uber driver. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)Bags of food from a local church pantry sit on the kitchen table in the home of Silvia De Leon in Noel, Mo., Saturday, Nov. 21, 2020. After losing her sense of taste, the Tyson Foods employee realized she had contracted the coronavirus and was out of work for several weeks. She has utilized the food pantry every Saturday for the past five months as she and her retired husband pay off coronavirus related medical bills. “If it weren’t for this, I don’t know what I’d do,” said De Leon. (AP Photo/Jessie Wardarski)Briana Dominguez, right, listens to her son, Noah Scott, pout about not be able to eat his sandwich on the living room floor instead of at the table, in the kitchen of their Skokie, Ill., apartment on Saturday, Nov. 21, 2020. After her employer eliminated her job, the family is moving to Georgia where living costs are lower. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)Phyllis Marder prepares to head out in the cold weather for her weekly trip Wednesday, Nov. 11, 2020, to the Hillside Food Pantry in Evanston, Ill. At first, Marder, 66, didn’t tell anyone about going to food pantries. Then she had a change of heart. “Keeping a secret makes things get worse,” she says ‘”… and makes me feel worse about myself, and so I decided that it was more important to talk about it.” (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)Nehemiah Powell, 14, sips on a drink Saturday, Nov. 21, 2020, as a volunteer at the Hillside Food Pantry social distances while he loads a bag of groceries into the family car in Evanston, Ill. After her employer eliminated her job, the family is moving to Georgia where living costs are lower. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)Noah Scott, 4, sits on the shoulders of his brother Nehemiah Powell, 14, Saturday, Nov. 21, 2020, as Powell labels a packed moving box in their Skokie, Ill., apartment. After her employer eliminated her job, the family is moving to Georgia where living costs are lower. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)Norman Butler, a first time food bank user, and his girlfriend Cheryl Butler wait overnight in their car, along with others lined up to receive food at a distribution point in Metairie, La., Thursday, Nov. 19, 2020. Before the pandemic, Norman, 53, flourished in the tourism-dominated city, working as an airport shuttle and limousine driver, a valet and hotel doorman. Since March when the normally bustling streets turned silent, the only work he’s had has been as an Uber driver. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)Larry Holt, left, thanks Diana Everett after she delivered a box of food to his apartment, Thursday, Nov. 19, 2020, in Las Vegas. Holt lost his casino job during the coronavirus pandemic and receives assistance from a food bank. (AP Photo/John Locher)Norman Butler unboxes food that he received at a food distribution point, in his apartment, after waiting in line overnight, in New Orleans, Thursday, Nov. 19, 2020. Before the pandemic, Butler, 53, flourished in the tourism-dominated city, working as an airport shuttle and limousine driver, a valet and hotel doorman. Since March when the normally bustling streets turned silent, the only work he’s had has been as an Uber driver. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)Bags of food from a local church pantry sit on the kitchen table in the home of Silvia De Leon in Noel, Mo., Saturday, Nov. 21, 2020. After losing her sense of taste, the Tyson Foods employee realized she had contracted the coronavirus and was out of work for several weeks. She has utilized the food pantry every Saturday for the past five months as she and her retired husband pay off coronavirus related medical bills. “If it weren’t for this, I don’t know what I’d do,” said De Leon. (AP Photo/Jessie Wardarski)Briana Dominguez, right, listens to her son, Noah Scott, pout about not be able to eat his sandwich on the living room floor instead of at the table, in the kitchen of their Skokie, Ill., apartment on Saturday, Nov. 21, 2020. After her employer eliminated her job, the family is moving to Georgia where living costs are lower. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)TopBuilt with Shorthand ReddIt A fox’s tail: the story of TCU’s campus foxes + posts Haeven Gibbonshttps://www.tcu360.com/author/haeven-gibbons/ Welcome TCU Class of 2025 Life in Fort Worthlast_img read more

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Sun West Mortgage Partners with Cloudvirga

first_imgHome / Daily Dose / Sun West Mortgage Partners with Cloudvirga Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago Sign up for DS News Daily Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Previous: Gateway First Bank Appoints Communications Executive Next: What Wells Fargo’s New CEO Means for the Industry Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Sun West Mortgage Partners with Cloudvirga Tagged with: Cloudvirga Sun West The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago  Print This Post Cloudvirga Sun West 2019-09-27 Seth Welborn Share Save Related Articlescenter_img Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Seth Welborn is a Reporter for DS News and MReport. A graduate of Harding University, he has covered numerous topics across the real estate and default servicing industries. Additionally, he has written B2B marketing copy for Dallas-based companies such as AT&T. An East Texas Native, he also works part-time as a photographer. Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago in Daily Dose, Featured, News, Technology Sun West Mortgage Company, a mortgage banker and national originator, recently announced its decision to license Cloudvirga, a digital mortgage point-of-sale software provider, and its suite of technology offerings to Sun West Mortgage loan officers and borrowers.Sun West will become the first Cloudvirga customer to utilize a pair of exclusive new technology offerings, DocCertainty and HomDNA, within its point-of-sale software, the Cloudvirga Digital Mortgage Platform.DocCertainty, a document classification and verification platform, assists borrowers with income and asset verification as they upload critical documents (like W2s, pay stubs and tax returns) during the home loan application process. Documents uploaded to the Cloudvirga Digital Mortgage Platform will be automatically separated into individual PDFs and scanned for accuracy and legibility – saving Sun West LOs valuable time and effort, maintaining compliance, and identifying mistakes that lead to closing delays.HomDNA, a document storage platform and post-closing consumer engagement app, helps Sun West loan officers develop lasting, lifetime relationships with their customers. Sun West LOs can offer the app to borrowers at the time of closing to store important documents (appraisal reports and recaps, home appliance warranties, floor plans and construction materials) in a secure, singular location. HomDNA also provides borrowers with monthly market valuations and a curated directory of local maintenance professionals.“Today’s loan officers expect their partners to bring the newest and most forward-thinking technologies to the table to help them win customers for life and build stronger relationships with consumers than ever before,” said Ty Kern, Senior Managing Director of National Production at Sun West Mortgage Company. “The Cloudvirga Digital Mortgage Platform, combined with the DocCertainty and HomDNA components, are representative of the platform’s best-in-class integrations. These new technology offerings will enhance loan officer productivity, improve speed to closing, and help our mortgage company continue attracting the best-in-class loan officer talent nationwide.”“Sun West is the perfect partner for these exciting enhancements to our core platform,” said Dan Sogorka, CEO of Cloudvirga. “DocCertainty and HomDNA will add significant functionality that will enable LOs to foster and maintain meaningful relationships with their customers. These components will also be generally available to our new and existing customers, including the Arive wholesale marketplace.” About Author: Seth Welborn September 27, 2019 1,418 Views Subscribelast_img read more

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Case round up

first_img Previous Article Next Article Comments are closed. Case round upOn 2 Dec 2003 in Personnel Today Related posts:No related photos. Case round-up by Eversheds 020 7919 4500Early retirement benefits can transfer under TUPE Martin & others v South Bank University, European Court of Justice(C4/01) 6 November 2003 Martin, Daby and Willis were nursing lecturers at Redwood College, which waspart of the NHS. Their employment was governed by certain Whitley Council conditions relevantto the public sector. Nursing education subsequently became the responsibilityof the Ministry of Education, and the college became part of South BankUniversity. Before the transfer, SBU informed the college staff they would be offerednew employment contracts, but that they could not remain on the NHS retirementscheme. The applicants rejected the SBU terms and conditions of employment andremained on their NHS terms. However, they joined the Teachers’ SuperannuationScheme and applied to transfer their NHS pension rights into that lessfavourable scheme. Martin and Daby accepted SBU’s offer to take early retirement; the issue waswhether they were entitled to the NHS terms of early retirement or those ofSBU. The ECJ held that rights and benefits contingent upon dismissal or the grantof early retirement by agreement with the employer, fall within the rights andobligations referred to in Article 3(1) of the directive. Accordingly, SBUcould not offer the college staff less favourable early retirement terms thanthose offered by the NHS. But as those NHS terms derived from the Whitley Council conditions, thetribunal must determine whether that collective agreement ceased to apply atthe time the applicants accepted early retirement. Discretionary payments were discriminatory Bradley & others v MFI UK Limited IRLB 723 October 2003 Bradley worked in the laminates section at the Stockton-on-Tees factorywhich operated five days a week. MFI then introduced a 24-hour, seven-dayoperation for part of the laminates section, but Bradley was unaffected by thisshift change. The new shift was unpopular, so MFI made discretionary ‘disturbance’payments of £280 to the 193 men and 11 women affected. These payments were notoffered at other plants where shifts were changed. When further shift changes were made at the Stockton plant, and disturbancepayments were not provided, Bradley complained of sex discrimination. MFIappealed, saying payments were only made to aid the initial shift changes MFI argued the tribunal should have considered all the staff in all itsfactories where disturbance payments could have been made. But the EAT held thetribunal hadn’t been ‘illogical’ to only consider the staff in the plant wherethe practice was applied. Irrespective of whether a narrow or wide pool ofworkers was taken, a disproportionate impact had been established on thefigures. last_img read more

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Microbes influence the biogeochemical and optical properties of maritime Antarctic snow

first_imgSnow melt in the Antarctic Peninsula Region has increased significantly in recent decades, leading to greater liquid water availability across a more expansive area. As a consequence, changes in the biological activity within wet Antarctic snow require consideration if we are to better understand terrestrial carbon cycling on Earth’s coldest continent. This paper therefore examines the relationship between microbial communities and the chemical and physical environment of wet snow habitats on Livingston Island of the maritime Antarctic. In so doing, we reveal a strong reduction in bacterial diversity and autotrophic biomass within a short (<1 km) distance from the coast. Coastal snowpacks, fertilized by greater amounts of nutrients from rock debris and marine fauna, develop obvious, pigmented snow algal communities that control the absorption of visible light to a far greater extent than with the inland glacial snowpacks. Absorption by carotenoid pigments is most influential at the surface, whilst chlorophyll is most influential beneath it. The coastal snowpacks also indicate higher concentrations of dissolved inorganic carbon and CO2 in interstitial air, as well as a close relationship between chlorophyll and dissolved organic carbon (DOC). As a consequence, the DOC resource available in coastal snow can support a more diverse bacterial community that includes microorganisms from a range of nearby terrestrial and marine habitats. Therefore, since further expansion of the melt zone will influence glacial snowpacks more than coastal ones, care must be taken when considering the types of communities that may be expected to evolve there.last_img read more

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It’s Time!!! A Checklist to Open Your Shore House for the Summer

first_imgIt’s almost that time of year again… summer shore house season! Some of you may have already gotten a head start and began the trek down to open up your home for the early Easter holiday or just to take the trip. Whether you have already began the process or not, Broadley’s has some important tips to share about properly opening up your home after the dormant winter months. So before you begin planning your Memorial Day Weekend plans or decorating for the rentals, take a moment to go through this simple home checklist. You might regret skipping these tips when its almost 90 degrees and your AC unit shuts down!Tune-up your heating and A.C. systemsIt is important to make sure your heating and cooling systems are working properly since they haven’t been used for a decent period of time. The best thing you can do is have one of our service technicians provide a regularly scheduled maintenance check. If there is an issue, we can help you determine whether the unit is in need of repairs or if it is financially beneficial to replace it with a new one. New units are typically much more efficient, bringing down your utility costs.Also, while you’re having your systems inspected, make sure you have the air filters replaced. People often forget to have these changed, leaving us to find some nasty looking screens. Replacing them helps to alleviate any type of air pollution in your home. How often you change them depends on use, environment, pets, and other varying factors.Replace your window A.C. units with A Ductless SystemNow is the time to check your window A.C. units if you have them and make sure they’re still running correctly. Replace them before the months get any warmer and reinstallation seems like a nightmare. If your unit does need replacing, this may be the perfect opportunity to look into ductless installs for a more energy efficient, safe, and reliable way to cool and heat your home. Recently, going ductless has been gaining much popularity for their ease and efficiency.Keep an eye out for plumbing issuesRemember that little leaks or a dripping faucet can lead to huge problems. A small leak might mean larger unseen damage due to winter conditions and a leaking faucet during the months you’re away will drive your water bill through the roof. Make sure to get these issues checked out as quickly as possible so that the problem doesn’t continue to grow and end up costing you. Plus, who wants to deal with an issue like that during their vacation?If you have any questions or concerns about your home, call Broadley’s today at (609) 390-3907 or visit www.broadleys.net to have one of our Comfort Advisers contact you quickly. We’ll make sure to help with your spring cleaning and have your home ready for sweet summertime!last_img read more

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Rose petals for the lost

first_img <a href=”https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a9SwaOCREkE” rel=”nofollow” target=”_blank”> <img src=”https://img.youtube.com/vi/a9SwaOCREkE/0.jpg” alt=”0″ title=”How To Choose The Correct Channel Type For Your Video Content ” /> </a> Mary Schneider Enriquez, the Houghton Associate Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art at the Harvard Art Museums, discusses the upcoming special exhibition Doris Salcedo: The Materiality of Mourning (November 4, 2016–April 9, 2017). Narayan Khandekar, Harvard’s head art conservation scientist, thought he had seen, analyzed, and repaired just about everything, from ancient broken pottery to faded Impressionist masterpieces to indigenous Australian bark paintings to human hair woven into modernist works. Then came a fresh challenge.The Harvard Art Museums acquired the evocative “A Flor de Piel,” a room-size tapestry by contemporary Colombian artist Doris Salcedo, consisting of thousands of dyed rose petals stitched together to form a burial shroud.“I’ve never worked with anything like this,” said Khandekar, director of Harvard’s Straus Center for Conservation and Technical Studies, as he donned gray rubber gloves to gently examine a sample swatch of the work that will go on display Nov. 4 as part of the museums’ special exhibit “Doris Salcedo: The Materiality of Mourning.” “It’s entirely outside the realms of what I’ve experienced before.”Khandekar’s frank admission doesn’t mean he and the museums’ staff aren’t ready to care for and conserve the delicate creation. In fact, Harvard’s well-respected conservation lab and staff of experts is a main reason the work’s new home is in Cambridge, said Mary Schneider Enriquez, the Houghton Associate Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art and the driving force behind the acquisition of the 11-by-17-foot work.“If Narayan had been opposed to it and said ‘Mary, this is so chancy. I don’t know how we are going to handle it,’ I would not have pushed as hard in my commitment that we should own it,” Enriquez said. “We’re an institution in which that kind of cutting-edge research should occur because we have some extraordinary minds and people focused on preserving art, thinking about the future and the longevity of works.”Harvard’s rich conservation history dates back almost a century to one man’s fascination with using science to understand and study great artworks. Hailed as the father of art conservation in the United States, Edward Forbes, who was director of the Fogg Art Museum, founded the Department of Technical Research (later named the Straus Center) in 1928. Today, the center staff uses knowledge from the past along with the latest technology to restore, repair, and safeguard works for future generations.To ensure that her piece would stand the test of time, Salcedo also relied on modern science to stabilize “A Flor de Piel,” and she provided Khandekar and his Harvard team with explicit storage and upkeep instructions.Anyone who has tried to dry flowers knows that petals harden and crumble. Determined to preserve her petals in a suspended, supple state, Salcedo sought the help of scientists in Bogotá, where she and her team treated the flowers in her studio with a suite of chemicals, including turpentine, glycerin, and collagen, and flattened them between sheets of foam. When sewing the petals together they used waxed thread that allowed the fiber to pass through the petals without ripping them. Finally, they stitched the petals onto a thin sheet of biofilm, a flexible polymer that lends the work an extra layer of stability.Rose petals in Doris Salcedo’s “A Flor de Piel” were sewn onto a thin sheet of biofilm to give the piece an extra layer of stability. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff PhotographerThe piece is stored on a roller that features adjustable tension. It is protected on either side by several polymer sheets, and conservators carefully wind the work onto the device when preparing it for storage to avoid creating wrinkles that could expose its fragile surface to oxygen. “We are trying to be forward-thinking. Prevention is really the best thing,” said Khandekar.The museums’ storage facilities have state-of-the art temperature and humidity controls that will further protect the work. But if some petals ever do need to be replaced, Khandekar and his staff are ready, thanks to a fine art first-aid kit provided by Salcedo, complete with spare thread, the chemicals required to treat the petals, and specific sewing instructions. (Each stitch must pass through three petals, and no stems can ever touch.)“She’s given us an entire playbook,” said Khandekar, “and so we can keep it going for a very, very long time — I am sure well beyond my lifetime.”The concept of time is pivotal to Salcedo, who is considered one of the world’s most influential living contemporary artists. Making viewers pause to reflect on and honor life’s fragility and what has been lost by those who have been devastated by political and civil violence is the animating impulse behind her sculptures and installations.Recently, distraught by the Colombian government’s failure to reach a peace accord with the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, or FARC, Salcedo filled a public square in the capital with 7,000 meters of white fabric that had been covered with the names of those who were killed and went missing during the nation’s 52-year civil war.Like much of her work, “A Flor de Piel” is a subtle study in both beauty and horror. Instead of choosing graphic images or incorporating vivid words such as sadness, death, or murder, Salcedo uses her artistry, her painstaking attention to detail, and her choice of medium to draw viewers into the piece’s deeper meaning, said Enriquez.“It doesn’t say anything with an image that’s realistic and a narrative that’s specific. It is very much about using materials … and the skill of being able to put together an object that speaks to these important issues.”“A Flor de Piel” was inspired by the story of a Colombian nurse who was kidnapped and tortured to death after aiding those injured on both sides in the civil war. In that vein, the work represents a floral offering to the deceased. The evocative materials carry the emotional weight of the piece, said Enriquez. The white rose petals, dyed red, are redolent of dried blood, and the supporting armature enables the textile to fall in folds resembling a giant ruffled bedsheet.“She presents a trace of the absent body,” said Enriquez, “and with it a suggestion of what has occurred.”“Doris Salcedo: The Materiality of Mourning” will be on view from Nov. 4 through April 9, 2017, and will feature four installations, including a number of Salcedo’s works created between 2001 and now. An opening celebration on Nov. 2 at 6 p.m. will feature a discussion with Salcedo, Elaine Scarry, the Walter M. Cabot Professor of Aesthetics and General Theory of Value at Harvard, and Mary Schneider Enriquez, the exhibition’s curator and the museums’ Houghton Associate Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art.Curator Mary Schneider Enriquez discusses the works of Doris Salcedolast_img read more

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Berlin man caught directing flight traffic with radio

first_imgBERLIN (AP) — German police say a 32-year-old Berlin man has been arrested on allegations he made radio contact with aircraft, including police helicopters, and gave fake flight orders while impersonating an aviation official. Authorities said Friday that the man was arrested Thursday night in the German capital. Police were able to swoop in on his apartment after he made contact with a police helicopter that was dispatched to the neighborhood in the hope of flushing him out. During a search of his home, police found two radios that transmitted on the frequencies needed to make contact with aircraft.last_img read more

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The Evolution of Rocky, as Told By Sylvester Stallone

first_img Sly Wouldn’t Let Anyone Else Play Rocky “I told my wife that I’d rather bury [the script] in the backyard and let the caterpillars play Rocky. I would have hated myself for selling out, the way we hate most people for selling out. My wife agreed, and said she’d be willing to move to a trailer in the middle of a swamp if need be.” — The New York Times …And Still Works Out to “Eye of the Tiger” “I do every now and then, believe it or not. It does work. Even after 30 years it gets me going.” — TIME Susan Sarandon Almost Played Adrian “First it was Susan Sarandon, and then we thought, ‘Well, maybe she’s too sexy,’ at the time. And then it went to Cher. I thought that’d be kind of interesting. Then Bette Midler…” — The Rocky Saga: Going the Distance He Provided His Own Wardrobe “I still have [the clothes] at home. We didn’t have budget for wardrobe. I bought that coat when I was 19 and living in Philadelphia. I bought it at E. J. Korvette for like $32. It was half leather and half something from Korea.” — Shy magazine Apollo Creed Was Almost Jamaican “United Artists was worried about [Creed being too similar to Muhammad Ali], and before they’d accept the script, they asked me to rewrite the Creed part. I went home and did it overnight, and the next day, Apollo Creed came back as a Jamaican. As soon as they said, ‘OK, it’s a go,’ I put the Jamaican back on the plane and brought back my real Apollo Creed.” — Playboy Get out that boom box, blast “Eye of the Tiger” and put on your boxing gloves, because the new musical Rocky opens on Broadway March 13! Directed by Alex Timbers and featuring music by Stephen Flaherty, lyrics by Lynn Ahrens and a book by Thomas Meehan and original Rocky star and screenwriter Sylvester Stallone, the new ringside extravaganza is based on the Oscar-winning film that started it all. Since 1976, Rocky has become an international sensation, grossing over $225 million worldwide and paving the way for five sequels and counting. But before the world caught Rocky fever, Sylvester Stallone was the only guy in the world who believed in the small-time boxer with big-time dreams. Read below to find out how a struggling actor convinced movie execs to produce his screenplay, and in 28 days with a budget of under $1 million, Rocky made history. He Wrote the Script in 72 Hours (By Hand) “I wrote it in 3 1/2 days. I’d get up at 6 AM and write it by hand, with a Bic pen on lined notebook sheets of paper. Then my wife, Sasha, would type it. She kept saying, ‘You’ve gotta do it, you’ve gotta do it. Push it, Sly, go for broke.’” — The New York Times View Comments Charlie Chaplin & Elvis Sent Fan Mail “Chaplin said, ‘Rocky reminds me of a little character I used to play. We’d love for you to come to Switzerland and visit.’ And you know what? I never went. A few months later, he was dead. Same thing with Elvis.” — GQ Rocky Beat Taxi Driver at the Oscars “At the Oscars, I didn’t have a bow tie on. It had broken. Later I heard people thought I was disrespectful. I woulda tied a shoelace on—something—had I known.” — GQ Stallone Was Dirt Poor “On my 29th birthday, I had $106 in the bank. To cheer myself up, I took the last of my entertainment money and went to see the Ali-Wepner fight on closed circuit TV. Chuck Wepner, a battling, bruising club fighter who had never made the big time, was having his shot. It wasn’t at all regarded as a serious battle. But as the fight progressed, this miracle unfolded. He hung in there. People went absolutely crazy. That night, Rocky Balboa was born.” — TotalRocky.com Rocky Rocky Got Cocky “I abused power. I was an authority on everything. If you had a disease to cure I’d tell you. If you wanted the history of movies I’d tell you. I became insufferable! I look at some of my interviews now and I wish I could go back and punch myself in the face. The press turned against me. ” — An Evening with Sylvester Stallone Rocky Flew to Deutschland “I saw [Rocky das Musical] in Germany, which was amazing. I didn’t understand a word, and I’m getting all choked up. But I always thought that it would translate to a musical because it’s almost like West Side Story. It’s a love story, but it’s something a little bit bigger than that. The audience knows the story but they’ve never seen it laid out in such a romantic fashion.” — Stallone on the red carpet Andy Karl Won Sly Over Immediately “No matter how threatening [Andy Karl] may look, you’re going to like him, it just comes through. And that’s not so easy to find. Tough guys are a dime a dozen. But a sensitive tough guy? Pretty rare.” — Rocky press video Related Shows The World (Especially Philly) Went Crazy “In Philadelphia, there’s no delineation, they address me as Rocky, for real. They’ll say things like: ‘Rocky, do you like this coat?’ Or: ‘Rock, say hi to my sister.’ Or: ‘Yo Rock, I know a great restaurant.’ There’s no Sylvester. Even the Mayor goes: ‘It’s good to have Rocky here today.'” — IndieLondon.com Movie Execs Didn’t Trust Him “They put in all these clauses. ‘OK, we’ll give you a chance, but the movie’s gonna cost under a million dollars, you got 28 days to film it and if you do anything wrong, if you breathe wrong, if you smoke with the wrong hand, if you drop your fork when you’re eating, any excuse, we’re getting rid of you.’” — The Rocky Saga: Going the Distance Stallone Returned Home to NYC “I was born nine blocks from [the Winter Garden Theatre]. It only took 67 years to get here, which shows you how Rocky moves slowly. But we got here. And what’s more important is, this character, I had no idea when we wrote this how this would turn out and that [these actors] would bring these characters to life in a way that I could have never imagined. Yo, New York. I love you!” — First preview of Rocky on Broadway Joe Frazier Auditioned For Creed “He got in the ring with me and we started to move around, and truthfully in 11 seconds I had four stitches. A clash of heads—I went, ‘This is not gonna work. I need someone not as proficient at smashing skulls.’” — The Rocky Saga: Going the Distance Show Closed This production ended its run on Aug. 17, 2014last_img read more

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Leap Year 2008: 29 Reasons Vermont Is the Place to Spend that Extra Day

first_imgThis month’s gift of a tucked-away day only comes once every four years. Here are 29 things to do in Vermont this Friday! “Ring in the 29th and watch it go with the Leap Year Special overnight stay at the Mountaintop Inn & Resort in Chittenden (www.mountaintopinn.com(link is external)). “Browse 29 books by Vermont authors at the independent Flying Pig Bookstore in Shelburne (www.flyingpigbooks.com(link is external)). “Order 29 seed packets from the Vermont Wildflower Farm, and deliver spring to your doorstep (www.vermontwildflowerfarm.com(link is external)). “Experience 29 minutes of nostalgia at your local antique shop (www.vermontada.com(link is external)). “Play 29 holes of indoor mini golf at Pizza Putt in South Burlington (www.pizzaputt.com(link is external)). “Savor 29 types of artisanal cheese from the almost 200 varieties made in Vermont (www.vtcheese.com(link is external)). “Lather up 29 Citrus Sunrise bubbles with Vermont Soap (www.vermontsoap.com(link is external)). “Try 29 varieties of coffee at the historic Green Mountain Coffee Roasters Visitors Center in Waterbury (www.waterburystation.com(link is external)). “Ride 29 snowmobile trails into the Northeast Kingdom from Lyndonville’s Wildflower Inn (www.wildflowerinn.com(link is external)). “Gobble up 29 flavors of Ben & Jerry’s Ice Cream (www.benjerry.com(link is external)). “‘Upgrade’ your soft-wear with 29 wardrobe essentials from Fat Hat Clothing Company (www.fathat.com(link is external)). “Try 29 drops of maple syrup on buttermilk pancakes created from mixes at Sugarbush Farm in Woodstock (www.sugarbushfarm.com(link is external)). “Spy on 29 species of birds from the porch of your favorite B & B (www.vtchamber.com(link is external)). “Sample the food of 29 New England Culinary Institute chefs and their students at NECI locations around the state (www.neci.edu(link is external)). “Take home 29 cider doughnuts from the Cold Hollow Cider Mill in Waterbury (www.coldhollow.com(link is external)). “Catch your breath on a 29-minute sleighride on your local farm (www.vtfarms.org(link is external)). “Kick back with 29 bottles of wine on a wall from some of Vermont 14 wineries (www.vtchamber.com(link is external)). “Knit, purl, knit, purl, 29 times to make a scarf with Kaleidoscope Yarns in Essex Junction (www.kyarns.com(link is external)). “Choose from over 29 teddy bears personalities at the Vermont Teddy Bear Factory in Shelburne (www.vermontteddybear.com(link is external)). “Spend an extra 29 minutes learning a new trail at your favorite ski resort (www.skivermont.com(link is external)). “Say ‘I love you 29 ways with 29 truffles from Birnn Chocolates (www.birnn.com(link is external)). “Dodge the bloodsuckers 29 times at the Burlington ECHO Lake Aquarium and Science Center’s featured exhibit, ‘Attack of the Bloodsuckers (www.echovermont.org(link is external)). “Take in 29 Grandma Moses creations at the Bennington Museum (www.benningtonmuseum.org(link is external)). “Shop 29 designer stores at the Outlets of Manchester. “Plan a paddling tour of 29 miles of the 740-mile Northern Forest Canoe Trail (www.northernforestcanoetrail.org(link is external)). “Choose a 29-letter name train from Maple Landmark in Middlebury (www.maplelandmark.com(link is external)). “Serve 29 dishes using recipes for Cabot Cheese products (www.cabotcheese.com(link is external)). “Stay at the Stoweflake in Stowe from February 29th to March 2 and enjoy the special Leap Day package (www.stoweflake.com(link is external)). … and the first thing to do in Vermont this Friday: Visit Vermont and play in your own backyard! The Vermont Hospitality Council is the largest division of the Vermont Chamber of Commerce, promoting travel to and within Vermont.last_img read more

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Rutland Regional Medical Center achieves the Governor’s Award for Performance Excellence

first_imgVermont Council for Quality announced today that Rutland Regional Medical Center has achieved the 2009 Governor’s Award for Performance Excellence. Rutland Regional Medical Center will be honored at Vermont Council for Quality’s 12th Annual Recognition and Award Ceremony on May 21, 2010 at the Lake Morey Resort in Fairlee, Vermont.“Rutland Regional Medical Center is proud to have achieved the Governor’s Award for Performance Excellence. This displays the caliber of staff and commitment to provide quality patient care we have at our organization. Through all of our hard work and dedication we have reached another milestone in our Journey to Excellence.” Said Thomas W. Huebner, President, Rutland Regional Medical Center.The Governor’s Award for Performance Excellence recognizes organizations in Vermont that successfully achieve performance excellence within their management systems and operations. Award recipients are evaluated by an independent board of Vermont Performance Excellence Examiners in seven areas:  leadership; strategic planning; customer focus; measurement, analysis and knowledge management; workforce focus; process management; and results. The evaluation process includes approximately 1,000 hours of review and an on-site visit by a team of volunteer examiners to clarify questions and verify information in an organizational self-assessment application.“The Governor’s Award for Performance Excellence is the highest level of recognition for an organization that demonstrates outstanding performance, achievement, and results in Vermont. The Vermont Program for Performance Excellence is proud to honor Rutland Regional Medical Center for their role model status by continuously improving their processes and systems through the use the Performance Excellence Criteria. Rutland Regional Medical Center demonstrates that using a proven, systematic framework for excellence will help to ensure their sustainability and meet the challenges in health care. We are pleased to recognize their commitment and dedication to performance excellence,” states Laurie Emerson, President of Vermont Council for Quality.Founded in 1896, Rutland Regional Medical Center has grown from a 10-bed hospital on Nichols Street with eight attending physicians into Vermont’s second largest health care facility. Rutland Regional has 188 licensed beds and more than 120 physicians trained in 35 specialty areas. Rutland Regional Medical Center is fully accredited by the Joint Commission and is licensed by the State of Vermont. It is a member of the Vermont Association of Hospitals and Health Systems, the American Hospital Association and the Voluntary Hospitals of America-New England.Vermont Council for Quality was founded in 1996 as a non-profit corporation that serves as a resource for Vermont organizations and individuals to build and achieve performance excellence. VCQ is modeled after the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award Program and is one of 40 state and local award programs in the United States. VCQ provides continuous improvement education and training, organizational self-assessments, feedback reports, recognition and awards, networking opportunities, serves as a resource referral for information, knowledge, and sharing of best practices within and between Vermont organizations. For more information about Vermont Council for Quality, please contact Laurie Emerson, President at the organization’s Colchester office: at 802-655-1910 or visit our website at www.VermontQuality.org(link is external) to learn more.Source: Vermont Council for Quality. 4.28.2010last_img read more

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