OIT to provide more Google apps for students

first_imgThe Office of Information Technologies (OIT) will flip the switch Dec. 21 to increase the number of Google applications at the fingertips of Notre Dame students. Katie Rose, an OIT infrastructure specialist, said there have been many requests from students and faculty to increase the number of Google services linked with their University accounts. The top three requests were for Google’s Blogger, Picasa and Reader. According to the Google Apps website, Picasa is a service for uploading and sharing photos, Blogger allows students to create their own blogs, and Google Reader offers users a faster way to access blogs and news feeds. “Students will now be able to access services like Picasa and Blogger automatically with their ND accounts. I know Blogger has been requested a bit since a lot of classes use it for collaborative work,” she said. “And Picasa is popular in the arts and even some of the sciences because of the types of graphic work they do.” Rose said students will benefit from the easy access they will have to these services once the change is made. In the past, students have had to sign up for separate accounts to work with these applications. “There was just a core set of services originally. It had Gmail, which was the most popular, but we also had Google Calendars, Google Docs and Google Sites when we initiated it,” she said. “Unfortunately, we weren’t able to add many of the other services before because that wasn’t part of what Google was offering initially.” Google offers 60 services overall as part of its suite. With a commercial account, any user may access them. For Notre Dame and other academic institutions, however, Google offers a smaller set of services. Rose said requests for more Google services from these universities are common. “A lot of other schools get similar requests and that gets sent back to Google from the Customer Advisory Board and other various online mechanisms,” Rose said. Google has taken these requests and analyzed account management, she said. With the upcoming change, they hope to offer more services in the most effective manner. “They are making an infrastructure change that will allow them to do all of these other services in one fell swoop,” Rose said. “That’s why it’s essentially happening all in one day here at Notre Dame.” Rose said the change would most affect students who have signed up for commercial Google accounts using their Notre Dame G-mail address. “There are approximately 3,600 that have conflict accounts. That means they made a commercial Google account with an ‘nd.edu,’” she said. “They need to take some steps to prevent problems. They won’t lose data, but they need to tie it with a different account.” Rose said students who received an e-mail on their conflict account follow the directions provided to ensure a smooth transition. OIT will adjust the system Dec. 21 to include the new services. Rose said they planned to make the change at this time to avoid conflicts with finals and the new semester in January.last_img read more

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Jordan Hall installs ‘cutting-edge’ telescope

first_imgThe new Sarah L. Krizmanich telescope atop Notre Dame’s Jordan Hall of Science will soon bring planets and stars from galaxies far, far away within reach of Notre Dame students and faculty members, physics professor Peter Garnavich said. “It’s pretty impressive, and I’ve seen a lot of telescopes,” Garnavich said. “I’ve been, as many of us have been, waiting for a long time for this telescope. It’s very exciting now that it’s arrived, and it hasn’t disappointed.” The latest addition to Jordan Hall’s cutting-edge technology will allow physics professors and undergraduates alike to investigate distant stars and galaxies with unprecedented ease and clarity, associate physics professor Chris Howk said. “The idea is that undergraduates who are taking advanced astrophysics courses will be able to come up here and do projects with this telescope,” Howk said. “Upper-level undergraduates, mostly physics majors, who are doing their own observational experiments will be able to come up here and use this.” Computer scientists and other non-physics majors could also benefit from the telescope and from the experience of using the device, Garnavich said. “We are providing a telescope which is very much like the cutting-edge professional telescopes around the world,” he said. “In fact, this is a professional telescope. And the goal really is to be able to train our students to use the bigger telescopes. “We hope to have a set up so that almost anyone that has some experience with telescopes can use it.” Howk said three light-collecting mirrors make up the telescope and work collectively to focus and direct the light from distant stars. That light creates an image astronomers can view either with an eyepiece or a digital camera. “The primary mirror is 32 inches across, and that makes it one of the biggest in the whole state, certainly one of the biggest on a campus in the state,” Howk said.  Garnavich said finding a telescope with a large primary mirror was a priority, even though the device had to be compact enough to fit in a 14-foot circular dome on the Jordan Hall rooftop. “My goal was always to get the largest aperture telescope we could possibly afford,” he said. “The bigger, the better. More light-collecting area for the mirror means more stars you can see, fainter stars, more galaxies. It just opens up a lot more volume of the universe.” A specialized image collector called a charge couple device (CCD) will be added to the telescope in the coming weeks, Garnavich said.  “It’s sort of like a monster camera similar to the things that are in your cell phone and everything else,” Howk said. “What we want to do is be able to see with very low light and low noise.” The CCD, along with wiring to the dome aperture that is still in the works, will also allow students and professors to control and look through the telescope remotely. “In theory, we can be at home at three o’clock in the morning when the telescope frees up,” Garnavich said. “Then we can sit in our pajamas and observe, then close it up at the end of the night.” Howk said the device, which was donated by the Krizmanich family, will give students and professors more freedom to test new ways of using telescopes and collecting data. “The skies in South Bend aren’t necessarily known for their clarity, but the types of things you can do are ones where you either need to experiment, because you aren’t sure it’s going to work, or you need to have access to a part of the sky over a long period of time,” he said. The physics department dedicated the telescope Sept. 20 and used it for the first time Friday, Howk said. “We looked at what’s called a planetary nebula. It’s a little fuzzy ball of gas in most telescopes, but most telescopes are smaller than this,” Garnavich said. “When we looked at it, it was spectacular. It looked brighter and more distinct than I’ve ever seen it before with the naked eye through a telescope.” Howk said the physics department hopes to inspire students to use the telescope for individual research.  “The important thing is that ultimately this is really for the students,” Howk said. “For the students to be able to come out here and say ‘Wow I get to use this thing,’ and for it to be their telescope, that’s pretty powerful stuff.”last_img read more

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Saint Mary’s screens film on freedom of education

first_imgSaint Mary’s screened the documentary “To Light a Candle” on Wednesday to help launch the “Education Is Not a Crime” campaign. The Center for Women’s Intercultural Leadership (CWIL), the Center for Spirituality, the Religious Studies Department and Campus Ministry sponsored the screening. The Iranian government makes it difficult for members of the Baha’i community to receive an education, although they opened some of Iran’s first modern schools, according to the campaign’s website. The Baha’i community, which is Iran’s largest religious minority, has been persecuted for decades. In the face of persecution, the Bahai’i community established the Baha’i Institute for Higher Education (BIHE) in 1987. The BIHE follows a tradition of Baha’i educational initiatives that date back to the 1800s and works as an informal university to give young Baha’is a chance to learn, the campaign website states.Associate director for CWIL, Mana Derakhshani, who is a practitioner of the Baha’i faith, said screenings of this film are happening around the world, and Feb. 27 has been dedicated as Education is Not a Crime Day as part of the campaign. “Since the Islamic Revolution of 1979, the Baha’i community … has been the target of systematic, state-sponsored repression,”Derakhshani said. “As recently as last week, security officers raided and searched the homes of Baha’is in [Iran] and arrested seventeen Baha’is. And just yesterday, actually, a man in the south of Iran was kidnapped and beaten up,” she said. “The film and campaign are aimed at exposing social injustice and religious intolerance through personal stories and rare footage often smuggled out of Iran at great personal risk.”“To Light a Candle,” a film by Maziar Bahari, chronicles the persecution of the Baha’is in Iran and the creation of the BIHE. Bahari, a Muslim Iranian-Canadian journalist and human rights activist, was incarcerated by the Iranian government for five months in 2009. The film uses interviews, secret footage and letters written by Baha’i prisoners currently detained in Iran to document the non-violent resistance of the Baha’i. The film sparked the “Education is Not a Crime” campaign, aiming for universal access to higher education.Sr. Amy Cavender, associate professor of political science, spoke following the film. Cavendar read from the BIHE mission statement, which says students and graduates will “be trained to seek knowledge, to search for truth, beauty and justice, to pursue excellence in a spirit of loving fellowship, to become independent learners.”“Those words resonated with me … as someone who is a member of the Holy Cross community,” Cavendar said. “The sentiments aren’t identical, but it did call to mind Fr. [Basil] Moreau’s Circular Letter 36.”Cavendar read from that letter: “We do not want our students to be ignorant of anything they should know. To this end, we shall shrink from no sacrifice. But we shall never forget that virtue. … We shall always place education side by side with instruction; the mind will not be cultivated at the expense of the heart.” Cavender said the founding of both Saint Mary’s and Notre Dame can be attributed to the emphasis placed on the importance of education. “Just about every place in the world we end up, we end up in education,” she said. “Sometimes that’s more traditional schools — grade schools, high schools, colleges — sometimes it’s evening programs for adults whose schooling was interrupted and wanted to come back and get schooling.”Cavender said the Holy Cross community and BIHE both hold that education is vitally important. “Every time I saw one of the students or the teachers [in the film] speak, I saw eyes light up with joy in following knowledge and seeking it and in sharing that knowledge with others and trying to build others up, improve society, make life better for everyone, whether or not they shared that faith,” she said.“So education is really important for the individual to help him or her develop into all that is possible for them to be and also to equip people to make contribution to the society’s in which they live,” Cavender said.Tags: Baha’i, Center for Spirituality, center for women’s intercultural leadership, CWIL, Education is Not a Crime, saint mary’s, screening, SMClast_img read more

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HPC encourages participation in dorm events, bridge with administration

first_imgHPC this year has a clear vision for the student organization, and they have started to take steps to implement that vision. The changes to the Hall of the Year score especially drive to accomplishing that objective.Grade: A-Tags: HPC, residential life, Student Government Insider 2019 This year’s Hall Presidents Council (HPC) co-chairs, seniors John Desler and Tom Walsh, have goals to make HPC more than a way to disseminate information but instead an opportunity to make hall events better and to make HPC a bridge between the students and the administration regarding residential policy.“Our job as HPC co-chairs [is] to be a bridge between all the hall presidents as well as between the hall presidents as a collective and the administration,” Desler said.For the second goal, Desler and Walsh said that HPC is an opportunity for the administration to leverage student insights, and they are working to open that pathway for HPC to work with the administration.“We have 62 people who were each elected by their hall communities to represent those communities as the leader of upward of 250 people,” Walsh said. “They represent a strong voice on campus, something that’s so central to what it means to go to Notre Dame. We should really be using those voices to make a positive change in the community.”Regarding recent policy changes, Walsh said HPC did not feel like it had the place in the discussion it should.“We feel like that’s kind of the place where we fit in,” he said. “We should be a necessary step for feedback in that process. That’s what we’re working toward this year.”For their second goal — helping hall presidents connect with each other and become better presidents — Desler and Walsh mentioned several changes to HPC this year. First, they made the vice presidents a more integral part of HPC meetings.“We wanted to find ways to encourage vice presidents to come and be involved and get their input,” Walsh said.As a function of a different HPC meeting room, Desler said they have accomplished this goal.“Definitely this year there’s a lot more vice president involvement and feedback,” he said.Another change Desler and Walsh made is focusing a percentage of the Hall of the Year score to participating in dorm events.“HPC executive board gets 5% of the Hall of the Year score to allot to a cause on campus they feel is prominent and worth of notice,” Walsh said.Walsh said last year all 5% went to GreeNDot participation, but Walsh and Desler re-allocated part of the score. Now, 2% of the score will be for GreeNDot and 3% will go to dorm events.“We still felt like GreenNDot was really important to us and a really important initiative on campus, but we’ve already seen so much growth that we wanted to balance that out with something personally important to our exec board,” Walsh said.To get the 3% of the Hall of the Year score, residents of a dorm must attend a certain number of events. Additionally, a number equivalent to half of a dorm’s residents must attend events from other dorms, but one person can be counted for attending multiple events.The events are selected by the hall presidents since each president chooses an event they want to highlight.“We tried to push them towards not doing a very popular event already like the Keenan Revue or the Fischer Regatta,” Desler said.Desler said these events tend to be new ones or events where halls have had trouble getting strong attendance in the past.“We wanted to turn these events into the exciting social events they can be and really increase the social atmosphere and emphasis on signature and hall events as social events on campus, like fun things to do,” Walsh said.Desler and Walsh said they have seen an increase in dorm events as a result of the change, and they hope the change will help dorms build their own identity.“We don’t want them to think they have to win Hall of the Year by being this perfect stereotypical hall,” Desler said. ”We want them to win Hall of the Year for being the best type of hall they are in their own fun way.”last_img read more

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County Launches Website For Promoting Local Businesses As Pandemic Continues

first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) A small business owner places an open sign in his window. Photo: USAFJAMESTOWN – Chautauqua County business officials announced Thursday that they’ve launched a new website geared towards promoting local restaurants and retail businesses who are still providing services amid the ongoing Coronavirus pandemic.  The Chautauqua County Visitors Bureau, the Chautauqua County Chamber of Commerce, the County of Chautauqua Industrial Development Agency, and the Jamestown Renaissance Corporation say a list of restaurants operating can be found on CHQbuylocal.com. They say businesses are managing takeout and deliver services, and are also trying different modes of operation.The website will initially contain a full list of restaurants that are offering takeout or delivery food services as well as links to their websites and/or social media pages. Restaurant owners can also utilize a fillable form on the site to ensure their business is included.“As long as you remain in good health, maintain social distancing, good hygiene, and common sense, there’s still a lot of things to do and essential services available in Chautauqua County,” said County Executive Paul Wendel Jr. “Please support our local restaurants and small businesses and order some take out or buy a gift card.” Officials urge caution in all transactions. Some businesses are taking orders and payments by phone with credit card payment. They also urge people to always call ahead to place takeout orders and tip generously. This situation is changing daily and some food service providers may have to make rapid changes in their plans.“We encourage the public to continue to support local businesses by safely patronizing their establishments,” said Todd Tranum, CEO of the Chautauqua County Chamber of Commerce. “In addition to directly buying services and products the public should make an effort to buy gift cards. Every purchase makes a difference for these small businesses. Please keep promoting our local establishments on your social media pages. Shop safe! Shop small! Shop local!”last_img read more

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New COVID-19 Case Reported In Cattaragus County

first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) MGN ImageLITTLE VALLEY – One new case of COVID-19 was reported in Cattaragus County on Saturday. The County Health Department says the new case is a female healthcare worker who lives in the northwest part of the county.Officials say she developed cough, sore throat, whole body aches and headaches.The department has now begun a contact tracing investigation. There are now a total of 48 confirmed COVID-19 cases with 15 active and 31 recovered.Meanwhile in Chautauqua County, there were no new cases of COVID-19 reported on Saturday.There remain 42 confirmed cases, 6 active, 32 recovered and 4 deaths related to the outbreak.last_img read more

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4-H Meat Auction Raises Over $85,000

first_img4-H Youth Everett LeBarron sold a pair of market chickens for the first time at the 56th Annual 4-H Meat Animal Sale.DUNKIRK – This month, the 56th Annual 4-H meat sale raised over $85,000 to help youth in Chautauqua County.Officials with the Cornell Cooperative Extension say the auction was held online this year after the county fair was canceled due to the COVID-19 pandemic.Over 90 percent of proceeds from the event was returned to youth, funding programs hosted within 4-H.There were no shows held prior to the sale, however officials say all animals were raised on appropriate feeding plans and of course with the highest level of care. Instead of selling by the pound all sales were by the head, meaning the animal was purchased for a dollar amount that did not depend on the weight of the animal.This year’s top selling hog was raised by Levi Overend and sold for over $2,000. The average price for the 35 hogs that were auctioned was nearly $900.Also, noteworthy this year was Holly Crandall’s steer which sold for $5,250. The average of the nine steers auctioned was over $4,000.Corinne Covert raised the top selling market goat which sold for $375, Kendall Eckman’s top selling market lamb went for $575, and Liam Griffith received the top dollar for his pair of market chickens.The sale was held online on Thursday, July 16 and Friday, July 17.Additionally, over $1,000 in donations were made to various 4-H animal projects and the 4-H Endowment held at the Chautauqua Region Community Foundation. Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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County Adds 28 New COVID Cases Over The Weekend

first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) MAYVILLE — The Chautauqua County Health Department has reported 28 new confirmed COVID-19 cases this weekend, including 15 new cases Saturday and 13 Sunday.The new numbers bring the county’s total case to 1,088 since the start of the pandemic. More information on the new cases will be released on Monday.Meanwhile the Cattaraugus County Health Department reported 15 new confirmed COVID-19 cases this weekend, with 11 on Saturday and four on Sunday, which brings the county’s total to 486 since the start of the pandemic.The new cases include three males and seven females in the southeast part of the county, one male and two females in the northeast part of the county, one male in the northwest part of the county, and one female in the southwest part of the county. Eight of the newly infected people reported being in contact with a positive COVID-19 person. Two of them recently traveled to Bradford, Pennsylvania, including a female who works at a health care facility and travels to Bradford for work.Of the county’s 486 total cases, 362 are active, 106 have recovered, and 18 have died. As of Sunday, there are 294 county residents in either mandatory or precautionary quarantine, 41,630 tests have been administered, and there have been 41,148 negative test results.last_img read more

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Tickets Now On Sale for Branden Jacob-Jenkins’ Appropriate

first_img View Comments The estranged members of the Lafayette clan have returned to Arkansas and their crumbling old plantation home to settle the accounts of their recently deceased patriarch. As they sort through a lifetime of hoarded mementos and junk, the discovery of a gruesome relic and a surprise visitor send the family into a spiral of crackling confrontations, repressed histories, and regret. Appropriate Scenic and costume design is by Clint Ramos, lighting design is by Lap Chi Chu, original music and sound design is by Broken Chord and projection design is by Aaron Rhyne & Rick Sordelet. The cast includes Maddie Corman (Love, Loss, and What I Wore) as Rachael, Patch Darragh (Kin) as Franz, Tony nominee Johanna Day (Proof) as Toni, Alex Dreier (The Assembled Parties) as Ainsley, Mike Faist (Newsies: The Musical) as Rhys, Izzy Hanson-Johnston (Billy Elliot: The Musical) as Cassidy, Sonya Harum (Blue Bloods) as River, and Michael Laurence (The Morini Strad) as Bo.center_img Tickets are now available for the New York premiere production of Branden Jacobs-Jenkins’ Appropriate. Directed by Liesel Tommy, the off-Broadway play will run February 25 through April 6. Opening night is set for March 16 at The Alice Griffin Jewel Box Theatre at The Pershing Square Signature Center.  Show Closed This production ended its run on April 13, 2014 Related Showslast_img read more

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The Evolution of Rocky, as Told By Sylvester Stallone

first_img Sly Wouldn’t Let Anyone Else Play Rocky “I told my wife that I’d rather bury [the script] in the backyard and let the caterpillars play Rocky. I would have hated myself for selling out, the way we hate most people for selling out. My wife agreed, and said she’d be willing to move to a trailer in the middle of a swamp if need be.” — The New York Times …And Still Works Out to “Eye of the Tiger” “I do every now and then, believe it or not. It does work. Even after 30 years it gets me going.” — TIME Susan Sarandon Almost Played Adrian “First it was Susan Sarandon, and then we thought, ‘Well, maybe she’s too sexy,’ at the time. And then it went to Cher. I thought that’d be kind of interesting. Then Bette Midler…” — The Rocky Saga: Going the Distance He Provided His Own Wardrobe “I still have [the clothes] at home. We didn’t have budget for wardrobe. I bought that coat when I was 19 and living in Philadelphia. I bought it at E. J. Korvette for like $32. It was half leather and half something from Korea.” — Shy magazine Apollo Creed Was Almost Jamaican “United Artists was worried about [Creed being too similar to Muhammad Ali], and before they’d accept the script, they asked me to rewrite the Creed part. I went home and did it overnight, and the next day, Apollo Creed came back as a Jamaican. As soon as they said, ‘OK, it’s a go,’ I put the Jamaican back on the plane and brought back my real Apollo Creed.” — Playboy Get out that boom box, blast “Eye of the Tiger” and put on your boxing gloves, because the new musical Rocky opens on Broadway March 13! Directed by Alex Timbers and featuring music by Stephen Flaherty, lyrics by Lynn Ahrens and a book by Thomas Meehan and original Rocky star and screenwriter Sylvester Stallone, the new ringside extravaganza is based on the Oscar-winning film that started it all. Since 1976, Rocky has become an international sensation, grossing over $225 million worldwide and paving the way for five sequels and counting. But before the world caught Rocky fever, Sylvester Stallone was the only guy in the world who believed in the small-time boxer with big-time dreams. Read below to find out how a struggling actor convinced movie execs to produce his screenplay, and in 28 days with a budget of under $1 million, Rocky made history. He Wrote the Script in 72 Hours (By Hand) “I wrote it in 3 1/2 days. I’d get up at 6 AM and write it by hand, with a Bic pen on lined notebook sheets of paper. Then my wife, Sasha, would type it. She kept saying, ‘You’ve gotta do it, you’ve gotta do it. Push it, Sly, go for broke.’” — The New York Times View Comments Charlie Chaplin & Elvis Sent Fan Mail “Chaplin said, ‘Rocky reminds me of a little character I used to play. We’d love for you to come to Switzerland and visit.’ And you know what? I never went. A few months later, he was dead. Same thing with Elvis.” — GQ Rocky Beat Taxi Driver at the Oscars “At the Oscars, I didn’t have a bow tie on. It had broken. Later I heard people thought I was disrespectful. I woulda tied a shoelace on—something—had I known.” — GQ Stallone Was Dirt Poor “On my 29th birthday, I had $106 in the bank. To cheer myself up, I took the last of my entertainment money and went to see the Ali-Wepner fight on closed circuit TV. Chuck Wepner, a battling, bruising club fighter who had never made the big time, was having his shot. It wasn’t at all regarded as a serious battle. But as the fight progressed, this miracle unfolded. He hung in there. People went absolutely crazy. That night, Rocky Balboa was born.” — TotalRocky.com Rocky Rocky Got Cocky “I abused power. I was an authority on everything. If you had a disease to cure I’d tell you. If you wanted the history of movies I’d tell you. I became insufferable! I look at some of my interviews now and I wish I could go back and punch myself in the face. The press turned against me. ” — An Evening with Sylvester Stallone Rocky Flew to Deutschland “I saw [Rocky das Musical] in Germany, which was amazing. I didn’t understand a word, and I’m getting all choked up. But I always thought that it would translate to a musical because it’s almost like West Side Story. It’s a love story, but it’s something a little bit bigger than that. The audience knows the story but they’ve never seen it laid out in such a romantic fashion.” — Stallone on the red carpet Andy Karl Won Sly Over Immediately “No matter how threatening [Andy Karl] may look, you’re going to like him, it just comes through. And that’s not so easy to find. Tough guys are a dime a dozen. But a sensitive tough guy? Pretty rare.” — Rocky press video Related Shows The World (Especially Philly) Went Crazy “In Philadelphia, there’s no delineation, they address me as Rocky, for real. They’ll say things like: ‘Rocky, do you like this coat?’ Or: ‘Rock, say hi to my sister.’ Or: ‘Yo Rock, I know a great restaurant.’ There’s no Sylvester. Even the Mayor goes: ‘It’s good to have Rocky here today.'” — IndieLondon.com Movie Execs Didn’t Trust Him “They put in all these clauses. ‘OK, we’ll give you a chance, but the movie’s gonna cost under a million dollars, you got 28 days to film it and if you do anything wrong, if you breathe wrong, if you smoke with the wrong hand, if you drop your fork when you’re eating, any excuse, we’re getting rid of you.’” — The Rocky Saga: Going the Distance Stallone Returned Home to NYC “I was born nine blocks from [the Winter Garden Theatre]. It only took 67 years to get here, which shows you how Rocky moves slowly. But we got here. And what’s more important is, this character, I had no idea when we wrote this how this would turn out and that [these actors] would bring these characters to life in a way that I could have never imagined. Yo, New York. I love you!” — First preview of Rocky on Broadway Joe Frazier Auditioned For Creed “He got in the ring with me and we started to move around, and truthfully in 11 seconds I had four stitches. A clash of heads—I went, ‘This is not gonna work. I need someone not as proficient at smashing skulls.’” — The Rocky Saga: Going the Distance Show Closed This production ended its run on Aug. 17, 2014last_img read more

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