Phishin’ With Perpetual Groove: On Slow Jams, Big Cypress, And Inevitable Gear Malfunction

first_imgPhish’s Baker’s Dozen run is quickly approaching. As is tradition for summer tour, there will be an enormous amount of talent surrounding the entertainment with pre- and post-shows galore. Phish’s thirteen nights at Madison Square Garden will be no different, as Live For Live Music plans to take over New York City with over a dozen shows of our own.L4LM’s Official Guide To Phish Baker’s Dozen Late NightsAs the shenanigans approach, we’ll be discussing Phish with a number of artists who will be in town performing some of these late-night shows. So far, we interviewed Craig Brodhead from Turkuaz, Matisyahu, Ryan Jalbert from The Motet, and Jake Goldberg and Chris Houser from The Werks. In the fourth installment of our “Phishin’ With” series, both Brock Butler and Matt McDonald of Perpetual Groove discuss their relationship with the band Phish ahead of their after-show at B.B. King Blues Club on July 29 (tix here).Since the group came off a two year hiatus back in mid-2015, Brock Butler (guitar, vocals), Adam Perry (bass, vocals), Matt McDonald (keys, vocals), and Albert Suttle (drums) have been putting together some of the strongest and most inspiring shows of the bands now twenty year career. To add to that, P-Groove released the EP Familiar Stare this past August, which witnessed a new chapter of creativity, maturation, and an evolution of sound for the quartet. The future looks very bright for Perpetual Groove.[Photo: Phierce Photo by Keith G.]Live For Live Music: Tell us about your first Phish concert experience.Matt McDonald: My first Phish show was in 1994 at the University of Florida bandshell. It was a free show on campus and I was blown away by Rift, which came out earlier that year. I had very high expectations; needless to say, those expectations were met and then some.Brock Butler: My first Phish show was July 3rd, 1999 at Lakewood Amphitheater in Atlanta. It was my sort of setlist. I’m a big fan of what I’d call the slow jams like “Gumbo,” “Moma Dance,” etc. I believe, it was the first bust out of “Meatstick” in a couple of years at that point. Though I wasn’t in attendance for the 4th of July show the next night, I heard they introduced the dance aspect to the song. Perry and I went together, it was a great time and certainly a special moment for two bandmates to share, I think.L4LM: How would you describe the music of Phish?MM: Wide open. All encompassing.BB: All across the board. Versatile. If it were in the context of someone seeing their first show, I’d explain that depending on the song selection they might be incredibly moved, or it might ask more of them as listener if it’s a more daring show. If it’s paint-by-numbers they’re looking for, they’re in the wrong place.L4LM: How many Phish shows have you seen?MM: A couple dozen. I couldn’t tell you exactly how many. I seem to remember something about how men drink and boys count.BB: Roughly 15 or so.L4LM: Do you have a favorite show, or most memorable experience?MM: Favorite show and experience for me was Big Cypress. I grew up in Naples, FL so Big Cypress was a bit of wildlife staple growing up that close to the Everglades. I had so many memories from my youth there from fishing with my grandfather, air boat rides, countless camping trips with friends and family, that Phish playing Big Cypress for NYE was a bit of a homecoming. I was in the army from 98-02 so these shows landed right in the middle of my four years and it couldn’t have come at a better time for me personally. It served as a reminder of why this band was so important to me, the community around the band, and why so many love them so much.BB: It’s a tough call, I enjoyed Big Cypress, but as a collective whole, when I saw four consecutive shows in a row (Antioch, TN > Lakewood x2 > Walnut Creek ) it was incredibly cool to see how they changed it up from night to night. In Antioch, Mike’s bass amp malfunctioned during the opening notes of “First Tube.” Then, two amazing shows in ATL. However, Walnut Creek was straight up lousy. I mention this because as someone just hoping to be a musician for a living, it was cool to see every aspect. Nobody is above gear malfunction. Phish, like all bands will have amazing shows and then after the longest drive of the four dates, it seemed for better or worse, the band as well as the audience were in sync.L4LM: What are two of your favorite Phish songs?MM: “Lifeboy” and “Rift”BB: Studio song – “Silent in the Morning”Live version – “The Curtain With”L4LM: What’s the wildest thing you’ve ever seen at a Phish show?MM: I think CBGTWH has the wildest “thing” that happens at any show documented and covered pretty well. Musically, one of the craziest things I’ve ever seen the band do was just a week after my first show when I flew up to NY for the Halloween show where they covered The Beatles White Album. That’s no easy task for any group of musicians, but to add to the theatrics the way Phish did completely blew my mind. Fortunately, they would go on to continue blowing my mind for many years to come.BB: “Wildest,” is a bit broad and subjective. I’ll assume you mean from the group, so I’llkeep it to strictly the bands antics. Riding in on a big hot dog at Big Cypress was certainly something crazy to see. I don’t know if this is wild as much as if was “weird,” but Wynona Judd singing “Freebird” at Antioch was….really something.Purchase tickets to Perpetual Groove at BB King’s NYC on 7/29 (post-Phish) here, or enter to win a pair of tickets below.Check out L4LM’s Official Guide To Phish Baker’s Dozen Late Nights!last_img read more

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INTERVIEW: The Jauntee’s Scott Ferber Talks New Album, Leftover Salmon, Twiddle, & Why Up-And-Coming Bands Shouldn’t Give Up

first_imgThe Jauntee—featuring guitarist Caton Sollenberger, keyboardist Tyler Adams, bassist John Loland, and drummer Scott Ferber—are rising stars on the jam circuit. The band has expanded their dedicated following in their hometown of Boston to a solid fan base across the country, earned in large part due to the band’s consistent, nationwide touring and standout live performances. With the band’s recent move to Colorado, their opportunity to tour coast-to-coast has become an easier task, and bigger opportunities supporting well-respected bands in the jam community continue to present themselves.The Jauntee recently released a new album, Always Never Knowing, which came out on September 14th. Always Never Knowing is an effort to mirror The Jauntee’s high-energy live performances, as the quartet carved out time to record Always Never Knowing during the group’s two-night run at Cambridge, Massachusetts’ The Bridge Sound & Stage. Recorded in front of an intimate crowd consisting of mostly longtime fans and friends and family, the new album offers the best of both worlds, with The Jauntee showing off their live jamming abilities, while also offering up 16 tracks, with nine of them previously unreleased in studio-quality format.Live For Live Music had the chance to chat with The Jauntee’s drummer Scott Ferber recently. During our conversation, Scott gave us the low-down on The Jauntee’s new album, which marks the band’s first studio recording with their new keyboardist, plus chatted extensively about The Jauntee’s relatively recent relocation to Colorado and life on the road with Leftover Salmon and Twiddle. Read on for the full interview! Sam Berenson: How did you guys meet?Scott Ferber: We all met in Boston, where we went to college. Tyler Adams, Caton Sollenberger, and I went to Berklee College of Music, and John Loland went to school for airplane mechanic work, but Caton and John knew each other from living in Pennsylvania previously. The Jauntee formed in Boston about eight years ago, when Caton and I started the band towards the end of 2010. We’ve gone through some lineup changes since—we had a different bass player, with John joining in 2012, and then Tyler joined in 2015. However, we were friends with Tyler before that and had jammed with him in the past.SB: When you and Caton started the band, was it a common goal to start touring, or did things initially start just for fun?SF: I think it was a little of both. The end goal for both of us was definitely to be in a band and tour, and in the end hopefully making a career out of that. It definitely didn’t start out that way though. We used to play a lot of parties and smaller events, but I would say the end goal for us was to be touring and playing as much music as possible.SB: Tell me about your new studio album.SF: We are just about to release an album, Always Never Knowing, that we recorded last summer in Boston, just before we moved out to Colorado, at the Bridge Sound & Stage in Cambridge, MA. It was kind of a unique experience where it was in a studio, but there was also a live room with a stage. We did a two-night event with 70 to 100 people in attendance, a lot of them being fans from the area and close friends. The album is two live shows that were professionally tracked and recorded, but it was also a live experience, so we were able to capture the jamming and improvisation, and, more so, one of our shows live, which we thrive off of.We compiled two CDs worth of music from those two nights and made the material flow together in a continuous set. We’re really happy with how it turned out, and this is our first official release with Tyler, so we’re happy to be doing this with him. Our previous studio effort was with our old keyboard player.The Jauntee – “Puppy In My Pocket”[Video: The Jauntee]Sam Berenson: It’s very unique to see a drummer holding down the majority of the songwriting. Have you always taken the lead writing role with The Jauntee?Scott Ferber: I guess so. Before the band started, I had always written a bunch of music and done some recordings playing every instrument on the track, so I had a little bit of background with that. I do most of my writing on the piano, creating a skeleton for the song, and the other guys, for the most part, fill in their parts unless I have a specific idea for the melody or a segment of the song. We all do our part in writing though, and everyone’s contributed with their own songs. I would say it’s a mixed bag in terms of writing in general.SB: Have these songs that are on the live release ever been recorded before on a previous studio effort?SF: Most of them have not. That’s another thing that we are excited about. Most of our songs are not on an album. We have two previous studio releases with about ten songs on each album, and we have nearly 100 songs in our repertoire including covers. There are maybe five songs on our new album that have been previously recorded, but the other ten tracks or more are songs that have not been in a high-quality recording atmosphere.SB: How’s the Denver scene treating you since moving to Colorado a year ago?SF: It’s awesome, and we love it out here. I really, really have been enjoying our time out here, both personally, being a big change of pace from Boston, and the music scene out here is awesome. We’ve been getting a lot more opportunities for gigs and are able to bounce around all of the mountain towns in the winter. There are so many good venues, including the Fox Theatre in Boulder, the Aggie Theatre in Fort Collins, and Cervantes’ in Denver, where we’ve been lucky enough to play. It seems to be a good move for us. The mountains are awesome, and everything out here is beautiful. We’ve been enjoying it.SB: Absolutely, change is good. Do you view moving out west as an important ingredient for you guys taking things to the next level?SF: I think it’s an important ingredient in terms of our general happiness. Having a place where we’re all comfortable and able to build a good fan base and friend base is awesome. We’re also a little more central now. We were able to do our first West Coast tour last year, hitting Montana, Oregon, and Washington, which would’ve been really hard to do from the East Coast. Now that we’re in the Midwest relatively, we’ll hopefully be able to hit all of the best spots on the coasts.The Jauntee – Paradise Rock Club – 4/7/2017 (Full Show)[Video: mk devo]Sam Berenson: I see you guys are heading out on a big fall tour, supporting Leftover Salmon and Twiddle on select dates. Tell me about how your relationship with these bands formed.SF: We’ve played with Leftover Salmon once before at the Aggie Theatre in Fort Collins, which came about through being a Colorado band and waiting for the right opportunities to arise for an opening slot at the Aggie. It worked out and was super awesome. I think we’re a good fit musically with Leftover, and the same goes for Twiddle. We opened for them for a couple gigs on the East Coast around two years ago, and it was a great fit. The crossover in our fan bases will work well together from everything I’ve seen. They’re really nice guys, and I look forward to hanging out with them for a week or so and getting to know them better.The Jauntee – “Before The Storm”[Video: The Jauntee]Sam Berenson: And you guys got a new van for this tour?Scott Ferber: We got a new van! We just got the emissions test done an hour ago. We’re psyched. We ran the last van pretty much to the ground, although it’s still running with close to 300,000 miles. We racked them up pretty fast over the last five or six years. We pretty much got the same van we used to have but newer—a good ol’ trusty Chevrolet. This will be the first run that we bring it out there, so let’s hope it doesn’t break down.SB: I hope it treats you guys well! Are there any bands you haven’t toured with that you think could be a really fun co-bill?SF: I think we would love to be paired with some jazzier acts. We’re huge fans of Medeski, Martin & Wood, Snarky Puppy, and Cory Henry, and I think there’s a crossover with some of the improvisation we do. We can crossover into more of the jazz-oriented crowd, which would be a lot of fun. No specific acts come to mind though. We do this acoustic bluegrass rendition of our tunes that we call “The Jauntgrass”, and it’s nice to have different opportunities interacting with audiences with different interests in terms of music genre.SB: That’s really cool. If you could give one up-and-coming touring band advice, what would it be?SF: Oh man! Just keep going and don’t get discouraged. Keep going, it takes so long. It’s so rare these days, especially in the type of music we’re doing, for a band to blow up fast. Even a band like Twiddle, who’s in their fourteenth year as a band, has been working to get where they are for years. The advice they told us when we talked with them was “Keep going.” We’re in our eighth year now, and we’re finally just seeing a push that we haven’t seen quite until this point. Don’t give up. Bands can’t get discouraged when an audience is only five people because it probably will happen 100 more times.SB: I really appreciate your time Scott, and congratulations on your on your forthcoming studio release.SF: Thanks so much, Sam!For more information about The Jauntee or their new album, Always Never Knowing, head to the band’s website here. You can also stream the new album below.last_img read more

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Michael Tinkham, superconductivity pioneer, 82

first_imgMichael “Mike” Tinkham, the Rumford Professor of Physics and Gordon McKay Professor of Applied Physics Emeritus at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences and the Department of Physics, passed away on Nov. 4. He was 82 years old.Born on Feb. 23, 1928, in Green Lake County, Wis., Tinkham earned his undergraduate degree at Ripon College in 1951 and his master’s and Ph.D. degrees, both in physics, at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He also spent a year at the Clarendon Laboratory of Oxford as a postdoctoral fellow.He joined the University of California, Berkeley, in 1957, rising to full professor, and then left in 1966 for Harvard, where he remained for the rest of his career.Tinkham’s research focused primarily on superconductivity, as captured in his classic text, “Introduction to Superconductivity.”In his later years he was active in studying the unique properties of materials when sample dimensions are reduced to the nanometer range.In the Journal of Superconductivity, Tinkham’s former student Christopher Lobb, Ph.D. ’80, wrote: “The opportunity to work with Mike … was one of the greatest experiences of my life. As a researcher, Mike’s rare combination of experimental and theoretical ability has kept him at the top of the field for decades.“As a teacher, Mike worked constantly to make things understandable, and did so with enthusiasm and wit. Any success I’ve had since leaving his group has largely been due to what I learned from him …”Tinkham’s awards and honors included election to the National Academy of Sciences; the receipt of the Oliver E. Buckley Condensed Matter Prize; and the Fred E. Saalfeld Award for Outstanding Lifetime Achievement in Science in 2005.last_img read more

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20 countries, one camp

first_img Nhu Xuan Le (left), 11, and Vy Bui, 11, work on their steps. Camping out Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer Counselors Jaydee Flemmings (left) and Maldini Bantefa observe the rehearsal. Yamilet Peguero, 9, originally from the Dominican Republic, gets some encouragement with a difficult dance step from Jaydee Flemmings. Nhu Xuan Le, 11, practices her part in the dance routine. Jaydee Flemmings (wearing hat), a senior counselor in Harvard’s Boston Refugee Youth Enrichment (BRYE) camp, leads dance rehearsal. The Boston Refugee Youth Enrichment summer camp, one of 12 Summer Urban Program camps offered by the Phillips Brooks House Association (PBHA), is helping dozens of immigrant children feel more at home and teaching them ways to succeed — both in school and in life.The camp was established in 1987 to serve Vietnamese immigrants in Dorchester. Today, however, its campers represent 20 countries, including Ecuador, Sudan, and Haiti. The camp has always focused on a classroom curriculum emphasizing English as a second language (ESL), including activities to help children of immigrant families learn their new country’s culture while maintaining a deeper understanding of, and appreciation for, their native culture. The campers are taught the importance of diversity, peaceful conflict resolution, and respecting other campers’ cultures and ways of life.Like the other camps, the Boston Refugee Youth Enrichment camp is run and coordinated by high school and college students through the PBHA at Harvard University. The camps serve more than 900 low-income, at-risk youth throughout Boston and Cambridge. The counselors work to empower campers to become productive, contributing members of their communities. No child is turned away because of an inability to pay. Counselors say that reaching out to local schools throughout the year helps establish good communication with teachers, and helps funnel children in need of ESL help to the camp.“The camp is awesome,” said 13-year-old Ben Le. “You get to go on a field trip every day and explore different parts of Boston, so you learn about the city’s history and community. And the kids here are really friendly. You can make friends just by asking questions and playing together.”  Le should know. He’s been a camper in the program for four years, ever since his family immigrated to Boston from Vietnam.Jose Magana ’15, the incoming president of PBHA, is a passionate advocate for the camp, having served as a senior counselor there for the last three summers.The camp “is different in that it’s specifically targeted to new immigrants who need to learn English, some of whom arrived in this country as recently as one week ago,” he said. “It’s an extremely diverse camp. One of the expectations for the camp is only speaking English, and it’s amazing to see how quickly growth manifests among the campers, even across so many countries.”Some campers attend for just a year or two, and others return for several years. Some eventually rise to leadership positions, becoming counselors as they enter high school and college.The camps “have such a powerful effect on the kids, and I hear that from teachers and community members as well,” said director of PBHA programs Kerry McGowan, who is currently serving his 19th summer with the effort. “It’s just an amazing program.” Yorklin Tejeda, 9, immigrated from the Dominican Republic. This is his second year in the BRYE program.last_img read more

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Melville Pedestrian Hit, Killed on Long Island Expressway

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A 52-year-old man was fatally struck by a tractor trailer while walking along the Long Island Expressway in his hometown of Melville on Wednesday night.Suffolk County police said Stephen Puleo was walking westbound west of Exit 49 when he was hit by a U.S. Postal Service truck at 10:30 p.m.The victim was pronounced dead at the scene.The driver, 62-year-old Russell A. Davenport of Northport Davenport, was not injured.A safety check of the tractor trailer was conducted at the scene.Second Squad detectives are continuing the investigation and ask anyone who may have witnessed the crash to call them at 631-854-8252. All calls will be kept confidential.last_img read more

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Binghamton man and repeat offender sentenced to over 18 years in prison for child pornography crimes

first_imgUnited States Attorney Grant C. Jaquith, Thomas F. Relford, Special Agent in Charge of the Albany Field Office of the FBI, and New York State Police Superintendent Keith Corlett made the announcement on Saturday. Officials say Senior United States District Judge Thomas J. McAvoy also implemented 15 years of a supervised release, which will start after O’Brien is released from prison. They also say O’Brien will have to $3,000 per victim for each of the three minors depicted in the images and videos that he transported, received and possessed. Officials say this case was investigated by the FBI and the New York State Police, and was prosecuted by Assistant U.S. Attorney Sahar L. Amandolare. They also say this case was prosecuted as a part of Project Safe Childhood which was launched in May 2006. They say O’Brien was previously convicted in 2008 in Chenango County for a similar offense and was sentenced to six months in jail followed by 10 years of probation. They say this is in connection with O’Brien’s first plea on October 23, 2019. In October, O’Brien admitted to uploading images representing child pornography on three separate occasions in June and July of 2017. Officials say 64-year-old James O’Brien of Binghamton has been sentenced for his second child pornography felony conviction. Officials say after a search warrant was conducted on O’Brien’s electronic devices on May 31, 2018, they found 650 photos and 8 videos depicting the sexual exploitation of children. (WBNG) — A Binghamton man has been sentenced to 18 years in prison for transporting, receiving and possessing child pornography on Saturday. Additionally, they say O’Brien will be registered as a sex offender upon his release from prison.last_img read more

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CNTB in cooperation with HAC will distribute cold water and promotional materials at border crossings and toll station Lučko

first_imgThe weekend ahead is one of the highlights of the tourist season, with a large influx of vehicles expected on all highways.And this is a real opportunity for additional promotion, so traditionally the Croatian National Tourist Board, together with HAC, this year again carries out the action of distributing water to motorway users at the toll station Lučko and border crossings. Water will be distributed through four weekends during peak hours, and in addition to water, users will be given leaflets with tips for safe driving on the highway in three languages ​​as well as promotional material related to health and nautical tourism.The goal of this action is to position Croatia as a country of kind and good hosts, but also to express gratitude to many tourists who have chosen many Croatian destinations for their destinations.Otherwise, the action will be carried out at the border crossings Plovanija, Rupa, Karasovići, Bregana, Macelj, Bajakovo and at the toll station Lučko.During the striking weekends, the water will be distributed in an organized manner from morning to 13:00 on Saturdays and from 15:00 to 19:00 on Sundays.85% of tourist arrivals were realized by roadThere is an increase in traffic on motorways every year, especially during the summer months. Last year alone, 18,5 million foreign guests visited Croatia, and 85% of tourist arrivals were by road.Therefore, Hrvatske autoceste, as one of the largest managers of the motorway network, through systematic and continuous communication implements measures to make users aware of traffic safety with the ultimate goal of reducing the number of traffic accidents on motorways. “We would like to remind you once again that the most common causes of traffic accidents are speeding, fatigue and a few years ago “distraction”, ie distraction from driving, most often due to the use of mobile phones. We also note that even the smallest traffic accident with only material damage, significantly slows down traffic.”Point out from HAC.The condition of the roads can always be checked on the official website of HAK or HAC.Related news:FOLLOW THE SCHEDULE OF SCHOOL HOLIDAYS ON BROADCAST MARKETS?last_img read more

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Trump misunderstands several truths about energy in 2017

first_imgIn some countries like India, the United Arab Emirates, Mexico and Chile, auction prices for renewable energy have fallen so much that they are “comparable or lower than generation cost of newly built gas and coal power plants,” according to the agency, which researches the energy sector for 29 member countries, including the United States.Based on current trends, the agency forecasts that the cost of land-based wind turbines and utility-size solar projects will fall an additional 15 percent and 25 percent, respectively, in the next five years.In the United States, developers of new wind farms signed contracts to sell power at about $20 per megawatt-hour last year, down from about $61 per megawatt-hour in 2010, according to a recent report by the Department of Energy.That report also points out that these prices are lower than those for electricity from natural gas plants and are expected to stay that way for years to come.That’s because wind power contracts lock in low prices for 20 years or longer, whereas the cost of natural gas fluctuates from day to day.Developers of wind farms — and solar projects — do receive federal tax credits, but those subsidies are being phased out and will be eliminated in 2020.5. Technical advances are making renewables more productive and reliable.Wind turbines and solar panels cannot produce electricity at all times in all weather conditions. On Tuesday, the Environmental Protection Agency published its proposal to undo the Clean Power Plan without putting anything in its place.The plan was one of the most important parts of former President Barack Obama’s commitment under the Paris climate agreement to cut U.S. greenhouse gas emissions by 26 percent to 28 percent below 2005 levels by 2025.The plan was meant to accelerate emission reductions in the power sector.Earlier, Trump’s energy secretary, Rick Perry, asked the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to come up with rules that would require businesses, consumers and anybody else who uses the electricity grid to pay coal-fired plants to be ready to supply power whether that energy was needed or not.He claims such payments will make the grid more “resilient” — many experts doubt that.Taken together, these proposals are a brazen attempt to promote one source of energy over others — a criticism that conservatives often lobbed at Obama for his attempts to do something about climate change.In fact, tied up in court, the Clean Power Plan has not even gone into effect. 2. Natural gas is beating coal.Coal has been falling out of favor because utilities are switching to natural gas, which has become much cheaper in recent years thanks to a boom in shale production.3. Renewable energy is coming on strong.The worldwide average cost of wind and solar power has fallen sharply over the past three years, according to a recent report by the International Energy Agency.While these sources of energy make up a small portion of the overall system — for example, about 15 percent of electricity generated in the United States last year and 24 percent generated worldwide — they are growing fast:Two-thirds of generation capacity added globally last year came from renewable sources.4. Wind and solar are becoming cheaper every year. But there have been great technical strides that have improved their performance.For example, modern wind turbines are much more productive than the turbines installed just one decade ago.What’s more, batteries have become much cheaper, making it less expensive to store electricity when it’s windy or sunny for times when it is not.The average cost of lithium-ion batteries fell 73 percent, to $273 per kilowatt-hour, between 2010 and 2016, according to Bloomberg New Energy Finance.The world needs to shift to renewables because they represent our best hope of avoiding the most calamitous consequences of climate change.Now, the economic case for these technologies is growing, too.More from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motorists Categories: Editorial, OpinionThe following editorial appeared in The New York Times:“Trump Digs Coal” read the signs during the campaign, and Donald Trump promised he would be “an unbelievable positive” for the miners.Now he’s trying to deliver by repealing the Obama-era Clean Power Plan and proposing to subsidize coal-fired power plants.These moves are, in fact, unbelievable.Not only are they a setback in the fight against climate change, but they also make no economic sense, since the cost of renewable energy is falling sharply.1. Trump can’t save coal. He only claims he can.last_img read more

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Number of Indonesians with coronavirus on Diamond Princess rises to nine

first_imgForeign Ministry acting spokesperson Teuku Faizasyah also confirmed on Monday that nine of the 78 Indonesian crew members on the cruise ship had tested positive for the coronavirus.Although the number of infected continued to grow, Terawan said the government did not want to act without due consideration in regard to the evacuation of the remaining 69 Indonesian crew members of the Diamond Princess who were still reported healthy. He said the government wanted to ensure that the pick-up process would not cause the spread of the coronavirus to the archipelago since Indonesia still claimed zero cases of COVID-19. “We, the government, prioritize 260 million people [in Indonesia] surviving while we take action to save our citizens in Japan,” Terawan said. Another five Indonesian crew members of the Diamond Princess have tested positive for the novel coronavirus that causes COVID-19, bringing the total number of Indonesians infected on board the cruise ship in Japan to nine as of Monday, the government has confirmedHealth Minister Terawan Agus Putranto said the infected Indonesian patients — who are among hundreds of people tested positive on the cruise ship — were currently receiving medical treatment in a hospital in Japan.“The infected Indonesian citizens are now being treated by the Japanese government, all nine of them,” Terawan told journalists in Jakarta on Monday.  Read also: Coronavirus: Indonesian citizens aboard Diamond Princess to be put in 28-day quarantine after returning home“We can’t just take a rash decision, we can’t. The stakes are huge. I also want to ask the media to help us in this, so that we can remain in the green zone.”Terawan said the government was currently negotiating with Japan on options to evacuate the healthy Indonesian crew members whether by sea or air. At the same time, he said, the government was still mulling over the necessary measures after they arrived home.The ministry’s Disease Control and Environmental Health Directorate General secretary, Achmad Yurianto, previously said that the government planned to put the remaining crew members into a 28-day quarantine, or twice the incubation period of the coronavirus.The decision was made after at least 634 of the 3,711 people on board the British-American-owned Diamond Princess — which ended its two-week quarantine period on Feb. 19 in Yokohama— tested positive for the virus.National Disaster Mitigation Agency (BNPB) head Doni Monardo has stated his willingness to help the evacuation process of healthy Indonesian crew members of the ship.“The BNPB has made preparations for the later technical steps,” Doni told Kompas on Monday. “All information must be through one door. We are waiting for direction from the health minister.”Topics :last_img read more

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Dominica’s leader issues challenge to Cooperative Division

first_imgLocalNews Dominica’s leader issues challenge to Cooperative Division by: – April 19, 2012 Share Sharing is caring! Share Sharecenter_img 33 Views   no discussions Tweet Hon. Roosevelt SkerritMembers of the Cooperative Division in Dominica have been issued a challenge by the country’s leader to create a “special loan facility” within that organization.Prime Minister Roosevelt Skerrit, who complimented the Cooperative Division for the work which they have been doing in assisting its membership in several pertinent sectors of the society, challenged them to submit a proposal for his approval on how this loan facility could be implemented.“What I would like to put on the table and it is something that I have been thinking about, is the creation of a special loan facility with special conditions for non financial cooperatives. I am urging the cooperative society and of course the staff of the division to put that together and advise me as the minister of finance”.According to Mr. Skerrit, the Cooperative Division has demonstrated both the ability and accountability in managing resources hence he is confident that they can manage a loan facility.“I believe that you have the capacity to manage those resources yourselves so we do not have to go to the Aid Bank or the National Bank or any other institution. You have the capacity as you have demonstrated in the past to manage the resources and to manage it properly and to be able to account for any single dollar given”.Registrar of Cooperatives, Mariet Canoville.He also advised that compiling the proposal should be done urgently and avoid the common practice of “taking a long time to do things”.“We need to move with speed because time is not on our side and I am prepared to make some resources available as soon as that advice is given,” Mr. Skerrit reiterated.Meanwhile, he also commended the Registrar of Cooperatives, Mariet Canoville, for her work in spearheading the division.“One gets the sense that there has been renewed life in the Cooperative Division and there is an eagerness for people to engage more with the cooperative society across the country and I want to commend you for that leadership and commend your staff for it”. Mr. Skerrit officially launched the Cooperative’s first magazine, “Insight” on Wednesday which features pertinent information regarding various cooperative movements on the island, one of the activities to commemorate 2012 as the International Year of the Cooperatives.Dominica Vibes Newslast_img read more

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