Summer Camp Music Festival Kicks Off With Pre-Party Sets From STS9, Keller Williams, More [Photos]

first_imgThe 2019 Summer Camp Music Festival is currently well underway in Chillicothe, IL, where artists and fans have spent the first two days of Memorial Day Weekend event enjoying a mix of performances while having to endure some lousy spring weather here and there.Related: Umphrey’s McGee Dusts Off Janes Addiction Cover At Summer Camp Pre-Party Late-Night On Thursday, Summer Camp attendees arrived at Three Sisters Park to start the holiday weekend early with the event’s annual pre-party run of shows. The pre-party has become the official welcome platform to launch fans into the three-day event, with this year’s Thursday lineup featuring performances from STS9, EOTO, Keller Williams, Spafford, Steady Flow, Barefuzz, Easy Riders, and many more.As the festival charges into its final day on Sunday with scheduled performances from moe. (two sets), SunSquabi, Lotus, Gramatik, The Werks, Doom Flamingo, Oteil & Friends, and more, take a look back at all the action that went down on Thursday in the gallery below, courtesy of photographer Keith Griner.If you’re feeling SCAMP FOMO, have no fear: Sunday 1-day tickets are still on sale. Head out to Chillicothe and join the party!Summer Camp Music Festival | Chillicothe, IL | Thursday Pre-Party | 5/23/19 | Photos: Keith Griner Load remaining imageslast_img read more

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Far-out findings from the cosmos

first_img My three suns Exoplanet might have oxygen atmosphere, but not life Discovery of a planet without an atmosphere bolsters concerns about bodies orbiting stars smaller than the sun Related Research may help solve puzzle of how Venus evolved Discovery of object with multiple stars offers insight into our planet Prospects clouded for finding life on the largest class of planets It was a busy summer for scientists at the Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian. Researchers put forth a theory that indirectly nods to a famous “Star Wars” scene, resolved one mystery about the solar system’s first known interstellar visitor, and showed that a star can sort of “sneeze.” We caught up with them and asked about these far-out findings.A long time ago but not so far, far awayIt was an unforgettable scene in the first “Star Wars” movie: Young Luke, eager for adventure, storms out his house after fighting with his uncle about having to spend another year stuck at home. Outside he gazes up at the fiery twin suns of the planet Tatooine as they slide toward the horizon, John Williams’ “The Force Theme” rising in the background.While a new study from a pair of Harvard astronomers may not have the same visual power, it does reveal that a similar view of binary suns may have existed in our very own solar system roughly 4 billion years ago.In The Astrophysical Journal Letters, Avi Loeb, Frank B. Baird Jr. Professor of Science at Harvard, and Amir Siraj ’21, an astrophysics concentrator, theorize that the solar system originally had two suns instead of one, and if true that could have far-reaching implications for the origins of a dense cloud that surrounds the system and a possible ninth planet.First, a little info on the sun’s long-lost twin: Loeb and Siraj think it had the same mass as its companion and was formed alongside it when the solar system began, but was situated 1,000 times farther from the Earth than our own sun. As to its fate, the two researchers believe it drifted away well before the Earth formed.“The binary companion was [most likely] freed by the gravitational influence of a passing star in the sun’s dense birth environment,” Siraj said. “It could now be anywhere in the Milky Way galaxy.”Siraj and Loeb aren’t the first to theorize a two-star start to the solar system. In fact, most stars are born with companions. But Siraj and Loeb’s theory could help explain the formation of the Oort cloud — the sprawling sphere of debris that sits at the edge of the system and surrounds it.Many astronomers believe the Oort cloud formed with leftover chunks of rock and ice from our solar system and neighboring ones. Siraj and Loeb say their two-sun theory could account for why the cloud is as dense as it is, since binary systems are far better at pulling in and capturing these types of objects than single-star systems.Such a system could also help explain the existence of a potential ninth planet that astronomers believe is out there — an undisputed one this time (no offense, Pluto). Their model supports the theory that this ninth planet was captured into the system, meaning it didn’t form here.An artist’s rendering of ‘Oumuamua, a visitor from outside the solar system. Credit: The international Gemini Observatory/NOIRLab/NSF/AURA artwork by J. PollardThe ‘Oumuamua debate continuesThe mystery surrounding our solar system’s first known interstellar visitor deepened after astronomers ruled out a major explanation in a new paper in The Astrophysical Journal Letters.The study rebuts a theory published earlier this year that suggests the object, dubbed ‘Oumuamua from the Hawaiian for scout, was a cosmic iceberg made of frozen hydrogen. Co-authored by Loeb, the paper concluded this is likely not the case because, if it was, the object wouldn’t have been able to make the journey intact. The scientists argue it would quickly melt or break apart when it passed close to a star. ‘Oumuamua didn’t even flinch when it passed the sun.The astronomers also looked at what it would take to form a hydrogen iceberg the size of ‘Oumuamua, and where it could have originated. They focused on one of the closest giant molecular clouds to Earth (only 17,000 light-years away). They found the environment there too inhospitable for iceberg formation — and so far away that it would be highly unlikely that it could have survived the journey, even if it somehow managed to form.The debate around ‘Oumuamua started in 2017, when it was first discovered by observers at the Haleakalā Observatory on the island of Maui in Hawaii. Among other theories, it has been hypothesized to be an interstellar asteroid, a comet, and even an alien artifact — Loeb himself suggested this in 2018 and has put out a body of work on the topic. He has a book on ‘Oumuamua, “Extraterrestrial,” due out early next year.All of this is to say that the truth on ‘Oumuamua is still out there, but perhaps it won’t be a mystery for long.“If ‘Oumuamua is a member of a population of similar objects on random trajectories, then the [new] Vera Rubin Observatory, which is scheduled to [be operational] next year, should detect roughly one ‘Oumuamua-like object per month,” Loeb said. “We will all wait with anticipation to see what it will find.”Gesundheit … to a star?Betelgeuse, the 10th-brightest star in the night sky and the second-brightest in the Orion constellation, mysteriously dimmed toward the end of 2019. By February 2020, the star had lost more than two-thirds of its brilliance. It was a change so noticeable that observers on Earth could see it with the naked eye. Many thought the old star was finally dying and would go supernova. Then it suddenly started regaining its brightness. By April, in fact, it was restored. So what happened?Put simply, Betelgeuse kind of sneezed.,This is the explanation a team of international astronomers led by Andrea Dupree, the CfA’s associate director, published in a paper in Astrophysical Journal.Looking at recent observation data, researchers believe the dimming periods were most likely caused by the ejection and cooling of dense, hot gases. Between October and November 2019, data and images gathered by the Hubble Space Telescope showed intense, heated material moving out of the star’s extended atmosphere at 200,000 miles per hour. They believe this mass formed a soot-like dust cloud when it cooled that blocked the southern part of the star, accounting for its dimming in January and February. While researchers think they can account partially for the anomaly, they have other questions. They can’t, for example, determine how the outburst started or why, nor do they know why the star is losing mass at an exceedingly high rate.What they do know is that Betelgeuse dims every 420 days. But new observations between late June and early August of this year show it’s off schedule. The star is dimming roughly 300 days earlier than expected. Yet another new mystery.Researchers also believe Betelgeuse is nearing the end of its life and eventually will go supernova. In fact, it might have happened already, and we just haven’t seen it yet.“Betelgeuse is so far away, it takes about 750 years for the light to reach us on Earth,” Dupree said. “So, the light from Betelgeuse [we saw] left the star at about 1270 A.D. here on Earth.”last_img read more

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Three Days, Three Community Events Celebrating the Outdoors

first_imgOutdoor Retailer has landed in Denver for only the second time, and the lead up to it was a busy one for us. We hosted three community-style events in three days. All of which brought people together in the great outdoors. On Saturday we piled into Carlos Vantana and nudged it up a forest service road for a group camp-out. Group camp-outs are always a roll of the dice. Will people show up? Will they bring friends? Will everyone be able to find the campsite easily? There are a lot of unknowns, which make it a stressful event to host. We went up a day early and saved a nice spot just west of Boulder, Colorado. Our home for the weekend was spacious, surrounded by aspens, and had a wonderful view of Longs Peak in the distance.  The fun thing about hosting a group camp out is the different types of people that come together to hang out under the stars. We had several families with children, a couple of people who are new to the area and excited to make friends, and a few folk in town for Outdoor Retailer who wanted to get away from the bustle before the conference began.On Sunday, we rose well rested and ready to paddle. We paired with Old Town Canoes, and JAX Outdoors for a Stand Up Paddleboard and paddle meet up on Standly Lake. Here we were taking another chance! Would anyone be interested in trying out the watercraft? Would they be able to find us once they got to the state park? This meet up was also a great success! We had participants lined up waiting to try out all the different options. JAX Outdoors brought a grill and we served burgers and hot dogs all afternoon. It was wonderful to connect with the community on the water. We even took Henry for a ride. Our last event was on the first day of Outdoor Retailer. Nite Ize set up a carnival in the parking lot outside the Convention Center, complete with moon bounces for adults, cotton candy, and a high striker to test your strength! the Live Outside and Play team was in charge of a frisbee speed test. You threw the frisbee as fast as you could through a tunnel and we clocked your speed. Fastest speed won their very own light up frisbee! We battled the classic afternoon rainstorms of Colorado throughout the evening, but still had a great turn out and a lot of fun. We parked our van and opened up for tours as well. Once again, these smaller events always leave us with a sense of rejuvenation. Being able to connect with your neighbors on a social level has a way of lifting any of the loneliness of #vanlife we sometimes feel out in the mountains. And then the wild rumpus began!Outdoor Retailer is a massive event with hundreds of outdoor-focused companies coming together in one place. When the Road Team went for the first time in winter, we were completely overwhelmed. This time around, we were a little more prepared for the expansiveness of the event. Organized into blocks, you wander through massive displays, often two levels high, with the newest of the new products out for presentation. Everything is beautifully designed, organized, and extremely pleasing to look at. There are speaker series, adventure film festivals, and happy hours every single day. It’s completely overwhelming and exhausting, but the energy of the people around you (and maybe the aggressive florescent lighting) keeps you journeying on to the next Moscow Mule. During this whole week, many of the vendors made it a priority to pair with non-profits that are conserving nature and making plans for an environmentally focused future. We were excited to support our rivers with the 5000 Miles of Wild project during the Nite Ize event. We attended other events that supported Western Resource Advocates at Epic Brewing, and even another that donated to the conservation of public lands for every beer sold at Ratio Beerworks. Keep it up outdoor industry! We MUST be leaders in conservation in order to keep enjoying our outdoor lifestyles.Up next we have another community-minded event! Join us at Upslope this Saturday for Apres alllll day. We are hosting a #vanlife rally during the event with plenty of vans joining. We can’t wait! See you there.There is one way for this tour to be a reality, our sponsors! Sending a thank you shout out to our title sponsor Nite Ize, and all of our other awesome sponsors that make this happen: Crazy Creek, National Geographic, Sea to Summit, Mountain House, Lowe Alpine, Old Town, Leki, HydraPak, UCO Gear and Wenzel. If you like the gear that keeps us groovin’ click here to enter for a chance to winlast_img read more

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Hatchett ponders the future of affirmative action

first_img July 15, 2000 Jan Pudlow Regular News Hatchett ponders the future of affirmative action Hatchett ponders the future of affirmative action Associate EditorForty years ago, there was a time when Joseph Hatchett was not welcome at lunch.He was in Miami to take the Florida bar exam, and because of the color of his skin he was told he couldn’t eat lunch in the hotel with the rest of the test-takers.Another black law school graduate with Hatchett was very worried. Would they get back to the exam in time if they left the hotel? What if they failed?And Hatchett said calmly: “Don’t worry. If we fail the Florida bar exam, we’ll sue The Florida Bar.”Of course, he passed the test and went on to make history as the first black justice of the Florida Supreme Court, the first black elected to statewide office in the South, and the first black judge appointed to serve on a federal appellate court in the South.He was not only welcome at a luncheon sponsored by the Public Interest Law Section at the Bar’s Annual Meeting in Boca Raton, he was the guest of honor.And Hatchett was the first recipient of the Allan Terl Award, the namesake of the late Ft. Lauderdale attorney who won the Tobias Simon Award in 1994 for pro bono work as a zealous defender of civil liberties.In introducing Hatchett, PILS Chair Paolo Annino presented him not only with the engraved award, but a “Mr. Lincoln” rose, the kind the retired judge likes to grow. Noting that many stories about Hatchett say he “stepped down from the bench” to go into private practice, Annino said: “Looking at his history, Judge Hatchett has never stepped down from anything. His private practice now is continuing his work in civil rights.”From his Tallahassee office at Akerman Senterfitt, Hatchett volunteers his legal services to Floridians Representing Equity and Equality (FREE), a coalition working to keep Californian Ward Connerly’s anti-affirmative action amendment off the November ballot.After Annino hit on the dramatic highlights of his civil rights days in Florida, Hatchett called those days of the struggle the happiest days of his career because, “The world was so certain then. You could tell what was right and what was wrong.”The struggle continues, but right and wrong is not so certain, he said. Noting the mission statement of PILS — “to advocate for the legal needs of people who are generally disenfranchised, under-represented or lack meaningful access to traditional public forums” — Hatchett said that is at the heart of a great debate taking place in Florida and throughout the country. And that debate is about affirmative action, brought to the forefront recently by the anti-affirmative action petition drives by Connerly and the One Florida initiative of Gov. Jeb Bush that drew thousands of demonstrators to the Capitol steps.“It was much easier when I came to Florida in 1959 and in those glorious days, everyone knew exactly what was right. Everyone knew what was wrong. There wasn’t much question about it. The question was really how long was it going to take to strike down segregation and discrimination. How long would those who were under those burdens continue to struggle? But there was no question that sooner or later America would find the right solution to these problems,” Hatchett said.With school desegregation, Hatchett said, “Finally what we did was bus people into what were all-white schools and that pretty much took care of that.”The next challenge was allowing blacks to sit at lunch counters.“Anybody who wanted a sandwich could get one. The large chains finally decided that was right and there could be confusion in the streets if they didn’t. One day, some of them said all the lunch counters were open. And that was the end to that problem. So the right and the wrong was not in dispute. It was just a matter of working our way through it.“But now we come to something that is called affirmative action, and it gets a lot harder,” said Hatchett. “If you give me a hamburger and you give somebody else a hamburger at the same lunch counter, you’re not taking anything away from each other.. . . But now, when we talk about affirmative action, there are claims that the remedy you are seeking at this time is unfair. You’re taking something away from someone.”Complicating matters further, Hatchett said, is that “Now, there’s even a question among minorities as to whether affirmative action is really for everyone, for the well-educated of the black race, the poorly educated, the middle class. Who’s going to get the benefit from affirmative action?”One of the problems is struggling to agree on what the words “affirmative action” mean.“To Ward Connerly, it means preferences. No public preferences in employment, education and public contracting,” Hatchett said.“Gov. Bush says, `Well, it’s not so much about preferences. It’s about quotas. It’s about set-asides. And although I’m eliminating affirmative action, I’m going to be taking steps to increase the participation of minorities in contracting, in employment and in education.’”There is no general understanding of the words, and affirmative action has gotten a bad name. To fully appreciate why affirmative action is needed, Hatchett wove a history lesson into his speech, beginning with 400 years of slavery on through voting rights and fair housing laws.“I told you that history, so I can propose to you that that’s the history we’re trying to overcome with affirmative action. Slavery, court decisions, the half century of wandering around trying to find a way to afford equal opportunity.”Looking out at those attending the PILS luncheon he asked: “What shall we do about the effects resulting from such a history?”And he proposed four possible answers: 1.“There are no lingering effects of that history. Close the file. It’s all over.” 2.“Yes, there are lingering effects of that history, but we don’t care. We really don’t care about equal opportunity and equal access in this country.” 3.“Yes, there are lingering effects, but I didn’t participate in that, and I don’t have any duty to say anything about it.” 4.“Yes, there are lingering effects. And we’re smart enough and we’re strong enough and we’re rich enough as a nation to find some tool, to find some technique, to find some system, to find somehow to guarantee equal access and equal opportunity to all Americans.” And affirmative action is a tool toward that end. “There should be nothing strange about it,” Hatchett said. “We’ve lived with affirmative action programs all the way back to President Roosevelt.. . . This is not something brand new. Somehow it’s simply gotten a bad name or our national resolve has slipped in terms of making this one America.. . . “What we’re talking about is opportunity. You know, Branch Ricky didn’t teach Jackie Robinson how to play baseball. He gave him the opportunity to play baseball.. . . “That’s what we’re trying to do here. We’re trying to take those who are behind and to give them the opportunity to either prove that they can or prove that they cannot live up to whatever standards we have.”Thankfully, Hatchett said, America has made great progress in civil rights.“And, thankfully, we can now openly discuss these issues. There was a time when you couldn’t talk about them. It was not nice to talk about them. Well, I want you to talk about affirmative action. Talk about racial differences, talk about it everywhere you go. Do anything except not talk about it.”Our answers to these difficult questions will have to be different in this new century, Hatchett said.“Do we care about equal opportunities? Yes, we do. Are we going to discuss these issues and work at them openly? Yes, we are. And once we decide those are the proper answers, I’m sure that we will be able to overcome the disadvantages that have been suffered in this country, by this tool called affirmative action.. . . And if affirmative action is not the tool we need, please, let’s find another. But until then, let’s try that one.”last_img
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Your credit union should try “cooperative branding”

first_img 7SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Michael Ogden Michael has been in the social media business for more than a decade inside the credit union, technology, financial and food industries. He’s the founder of For3, LLC, which … Web: www.for3forgood.com Details “Cooperative Branding” is when two or more brands share a promotion or idea. And  shockingly it’s not used hardly at all in the cooperative space.Think of some summer promotions you’ve seen involving a huge hotel chain and a rental car company. Two totally different things, yet, when connected, it’s a powerful promotional and useful tool for travelers.Now that the summer season is officially here, I’ve been looking at how cooperatives (food co-ops and credit unions) can partner with other cooperatives to create”stickiness” between the brands and member/owners and how that plays out using social media. (Yes, these are the kinds of things I think about all the time!!!!) For instance, take this high-production example of Dairy Queen and SpikeTV partnering for a dual branded commercial.Granted, this is a pretty expensive cooperatively branded partnership. Still though, it serves both brands well. So what can your credit union do to create an environment for a cooperative branding experience? For that, we have to look at what’s happening in Europe.The co-operative culture there cannot compare to the U.S. since they (co-operatives) actually all work together for one common goal – solidify the credit union brand as “for the people” instead of a lot of individual identities. (That argument will be addressed in future posts.) Cooperatives in the UK consistently co-brand with other cooperatives in or to share and connect with member/owners with a consistent message. They use what’s called the “Cooperative Commission”  to help create and sustain these partnerships. One such cooperative branding initiative was created between Midcounties Co-Operative and a mobility company to help disabled members/owners connect with services to help them shop in the Co-op.I’m sure there are 1000s of other examples like this happening around the U.S. but unfortunately I cannot seem to find them being promoted loud enough to show up on social media. What can credit unions do to accomplish a successful cooperative branding partnership?Look at your credit union’s marketing goals and select one thing you’d like to promote this summer (i.e. increase home loans, provide community support for race relations, raise money for school supplies for the fall…..)Find a partner to promote the goal/issue with your credit union and create a narrative for the story. If it’s a housing organization for low-income families, or a local organization who also is working on race relations or even a local elementary school in desperate need of supplies for low-income families. Set your metric goals and running length of the promotion and get moving.Pick one social media channel to promote your combined goal. If you’ve already done your audience research, you’ll know what platform will connect and resonate with your membership and audience to do the most good.Regularly post and connect with the credit union branding goal in mind. Your messaging should revolve around these efforts until the end date.Make a huge deal out of your results. Your credit union and branding partner should both team together to unveil the results and stories gathered from this experiment with your social audience. There’s nothing worse than following a story/dual-promotion project and not hearing or seeing how it ends. Create videos or Memes or infographics to explain what you did and what it resulted in for the community and/or the two brands.Cooperative branding, I think, should be a staple of cooperatives marketing teams around our country. Too much we are existing in our own worlds when there’s a much larger world interested in what you’re doing to make the most good happen. Too often we rely on the media to tell our story and it’s time to own it in partnership with other brands like yours that give a crap.last_img read more

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Get your ticket to ride

first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img

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Locals urged to visit Antique’s tourist sites

first_imgGuests partake of the roasted native pigs as part of the launching of the province’s bid as the Native Lechon Capital of the Philippines in Barangay Tuno, Tibiao, Antique on Oct. 27. ANTIQUE PIO “Our tourist arrival is nowincreasing,” he said. SAN JOSE, Antique – The Department ofTourism-Region 6 (DOT-6) encouraged tourists and locals to experience theattraction sites of this province.      “Our tourist arrivals, while affectedby the Boracay closure, are starting to increase again this 2019,” hesaid.  He added that in 2015, there were only12,000 tourists who visited Tibiao; 29,000 in 2016 and 67,000 in 2017.  Meanwhile, a resort which won thecooking challenge during the festival, prepared dishes such as “chicken pandan”(marinated chicken in pandan leaves), “tamwa-an” or deep-fried grated cassavarolled into two-inch sized balls, and “linanggawan na tambo” or bamboo shootmixed with other ingredients and vinegar. During the Northern Antique RiverFestival, DOT-6 legal officer Sedfrey Cabaluna said the province has naturalattractions like rivers that could be a site for several unique activities forlocals and international tourists alike. The first of the two-day festival washeld at the Bugang River in Barangay Guia, Pandan, Antique on Oct. 26; whilethe second day was at the Lagdo and Butong rivers in Tibiao, Antique. center_img “We should value and preserve ournatural attractions like the river,” Cabaluna added. Tibiao tourism officer John PaulFernando on Monday hoped to lure more tourists to their town through thefestivity, which was initiated by resort owner Flord Nicson Calawag to promotetheir town’s tourism industry. Cabaluna said these waters were sitesof the river tubing races. He added that the province also launched its bid ofbecoming the “native lechon capitalof the Philippines.” He added that from January to Octoberthis year, 70,000 tourists visited the municipality. “We are expecting that by the end ofthe year we could reach the 100,000 tourist visitors targeted,” he said.         He added although most of the touristsare domestic, there are also Koreans, Russians, and Americans who come toTibiao after visiting Boracay Island in Aklan.(With a report from PNA/PN)last_img read more

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Chukwueze, Ndidi, Oshoala rock Eagles, Falcons new kits (photos)

first_img According to the official Twitter handle of the Nigeria Football Federation, the new kits were officially launched on Sunday, September 20. Interestingly, the new home jersey comes in traditional green and white national colours, with the white running down the middle from top to bottom. The pitch green and white patterns hang on the shoulders just like an Agbada, a popular four-piece attire rominent among the Yoruba speaking tribe of southwestern Nigeria which Nike draws inspiration from. Promoted Content7 Black Hole Facts That Will Change Your View Of The UniverseBirds Enjoy Living In A Gallery Space Created For Them10 Risky Jobs Some Women DoTop 10 Enemies Turned Friends in TV6 Best Supercars In Movies You’ll Dream To Drive At Least OnceWhat Happens To Your Brain When You Play Too Much Video Games?The Very Last Bitcoin Will Be Mined Around 2140. Read MoreYou’ve Only Seen Such Colorful Hairdos In A Handful Of Anime6 Great Ancient Mysteries That Make China Worth Visiting13 kids at weddings who just don’t give a hoot5 Of The World’s Most Unique Theme Parks7 Theories About The Death Of Our Universe Read Also: Ronaldo nets as Pirlo wins first match in charge of Juventus On the other hand, the away kit is all-grey with the pitch green and white patterns in the V-shaped collar and sleeves. The new kit are expected to be on display in October when the Eagles trade tackles in their double-header friendly against Cote d’Ivoire’s Elephants and Tunisia’s Cathlage Eagles. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Samuel Chukwueze alongside the likes of  Wilfred Ndidi, William Troost-Ekong, Asisat Oshoala and Rashidat Ajibade were among Super Eagles and Super Falcons stars that rocked the new Nike home and away kits. Loading… last_img read more

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West Ham issue warning over racist abuse

first_img The statement continued: “Working with the Metropolitan Police, we will pursue the harshest sanctions against any individual who goes against what we stand for as a club, and in the rare case that you do see or hear anything you think is unacceptable, there are a number of ways you can report the matter. “The club is extremely proud of its work in supporting programmes that promote tolerance and inclusion, and you will have seen more evidence of that this week as we push the message of the Football v Homophobia campaign. “West Ham United were one of the first professional football clubs to lend its support to this important movement, and our work there sits alongside our support of Kick it Out, Holocaust Memorial Day, Black History Month, Inter-Faith Week and many other key initiatives.” After the match on November 25, the FA launched an investigation into reports of the abuse, while West Ham banned one of two fans cautioned by police. A section of Hammers fans had appeared to mock both the gassing of Jews in the Holocaust and the knife attack on a Spurs fan before Tottenham’s game in Rome last week. West Ham’s Israeli international Yossi Benayoun also spoke of his disappointment and embarrassment at hearing anti-Semitic abuse by some of the club’s fans towards Tottenham’s supporters. There were also reportedly chants about Adolf Hitler during the match, which Spurs won 3-1. The chants were also reported to the police by the Society of Black Lawyers. West Ham’s owners have issued a warning ahead of Monday night’s visit of Tottenham that they have a zero-tolerance approach to any racist behaviour by supporters. The Football Association is investigating allegations of anti-Semitic abuse at the previous encounter between the two sides at White Hart Lane earlier this season. And in a message to fans, the Hammers’ co-owners David Gold and David Sullivan have warned the club will not tolerate any incidences of racism at Upton Park. Gold and Sullivan said in a statement: “There are occasions when individuals still act in an inappropriate way and we have a simple zero-tolerance policy when those isolated incidents do occur at matches at the Boleyn Ground.” center_img Press Associationlast_img read more

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Judo trio exit early

first_imgIt was an unsuccessful third day of the Judo World Championships for Great Britain and Ireland, with early exits for all three competitors in action. Ireland’s Eoin Fleming fell at the first hurdle in the men’s -73kg, beaten in round two by Costa Rican Osman Murillo Segura after a first-round bye. Britain’s Jan Gosiewski suffered the same fate against Dutchman Dex Elmont and neither he nor Fleming made the repechage. In the women’s -57kg category, Britain’s Nekoda Smythe Davis was beaten in the first round by Hedvig Karakas of Hungary. Press Associationlast_img read more

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