House with 8,000 avocado trees tops 2018 sales to date

first_imgThis home is the most expensive sold in Queensland so far this year at $3m.AN avocado farm with over 8,000 fruiting trees is riding a wave of hipster success, becoming one of the most expensive Queensland properties sold so far this year.The property, which comes with a classic Queenslander cottage, dams, production facilities and equipment sold for $3m during the first week in January, as demand for the creamy fruit continues to rocket among millennials. Avocado trees for miles.More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus22 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market22 hours ago 418 Scotchy Pocket Road, Gunalda, comes with an avocado sorting facility. The home’s avocados have been branded for the Melbourne market too.The three bedroom, single bathroom, six parking space home at 418 Scotchy Pocket Road, Gunalda, is two and a half hours north of Brisbane and just a half-hour drive to Gympie.John Bambling of Bambling Property Hendra marketed it as a “highly profitable avocado farm” spanning 92.29ha. The home currently has 8,038 avocado trees that last year produced 22,000 trays at $33 per tray, earning $726,000.“These trees will be at full production within two years producing an estimate of 50,000 trays. A further 2000 seedlings planted this year will produce another 5,500 trays in three years and up to 13,000 trays within five years.” Not a bad outlook and not too far to walk to work. Loads of equipment were thrown in to the deal on a walk in, walk out basis.With farming costs at $110,000 and labour and packing costs at $110,000, this millennial favourite pays its own way.“With established markets in Queensland and recently branded for the Melbourne markets — this farm has been taken to the next level in securing future market dominance. This outstanding avocado enterprise has been fully developed for profit and provides an opportunity like no other. Quite simply the numbers speak for themselves.”The three bedroom residence on the property has wraparound verandas and there are also staff quarters in the sorting and packing facility with five rooms, a kitchenette, bathroom, team room and office. Follow Sophie Foster on Facebook A dream home for those who love smashed avocado on toast.last_img read more

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UK ‘could ignore’ European share-ownership rules

first_img“Whether this directive will find its way into UK law could all be down to timing,” Everett said.“Right now, it is more than possible it will not become EU law until after the government fires the Article 50 starting-gun for Brexit. If this proves to be the case, then it would seem this will be one of the first EU directives the UK can ignore.”The Financial Reporting Council (FRC), which had significant input into the UK’s response to the directive’s consultation process, said in a recent report it was “unclear how the UK may be affected by ongoing regulatory changes”.However, when referring specifically to the Shareholder Rights Directive, the FRC praised European lawmakers for retaining a ‘comply or explain’ approach used widely in the UK.“The government and FRC will consider how we may incorporate elements of the directive as necessary when it has been approved in plenary early in 2017,” the FRC added.A spokesperson for the FRC said: “It is the government’s decision [whether] to implement [the directive], and we will assist in whatever way we are needed to.”As the UK prepares to start negotiations to leave the EU, speculation is mounting as to the economic and regulatory impact on the country’s financial services sector.Earlier this month, the Financial Inclusion Centre, a think-tank, warned that asset managers might try to resist new rules from the UK’s regulator by citing Brexit-related uncertainty.But Francois Barker, partner and head of pensions at Eversheds, said it would be politically difficult to scrap many EU financial rules, even those not yet enshrined in UK law.“If we do want to be in the club at all, we will have to have some form of [regulatory] equivalence,” Barker said, although he admitted the government may “soft-pedal” on some areas, delaying input or implementation until the UK is out of the EU. The EU’s Shareholder Rights Directive could become the first pension-related European legislation to be scrapped due to Brexit, a consultant has claimed.Under the rules, which are awaiting final approval from the European Parliament, pension funds and other institutional investors must report regularly on their engagement with the companies in which they invest.They must also report regularly on fund manager remuneration, incentives and portfolio turnover costs.David Everett, partner at LCP, said the “potentially onerous” rules may not be enforced in the UK, with the British government poised to start official EU exit negotiations in March.last_img read more

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Italy’s social security chair warns on pension impact of border closure

first_img“Immigrants provide a very important contribution to the financing of our social protection system and their function is destined to grow in the next decades,” added Boeri, “while the generations of indigenous workers that enter the labour market will become smaller.”Matteo Salvini, deputy prime minister and interior minister, who has taken strong measures to stop the inflow of migrants into Italy, hit out on Twitter, saying: “The chairman of INPS continues to be political, ignoring the will to work of so many Italians.”In a video on Facebook, Salvini said: “Much will have to be changed in these organisations”, referring to INPS and other public bodies.Agency models €38bn financing gapBoeri pointed to data from the INPS annual report that showed that a reduced inflow of foreign, non-European Union workers in the country would have a negative impact on its social protection system.As part of the annual report, the organisation modelled the evolution of welfare expenditure until 2040 if the inflow of foreign non-EU workers would be stopped completely.The report showed that, in the three years before Italy’s economic crisis, 150,000 foreign non-EU workers would join the system each year. At the same time, 5% of the stock of foreign workers, which amounted to around 100,000 people, would leave the labour force.Assuming that, each year until 2040, the stock of foreign workers contributing to the system falls by 80,000 on average, the report claims that INPS would lose €73bn in contributions from immigrant workers each year. At the same time the organisation would gain €35bn in welfare expenditure directed at foreign workers.The net balance would be a gap of €38bn in INPS coffers each year. The chairman of Istituto Nazionale della Previdenza Sociale (INPS), Italy’s social security agency, has said the country needs a steady inflow of immigrants to redress the imbalance between contributions and payouts within Italy’s pay-as-you-go first-pillar pension system.     Tito Boeri’s comments have drawn scorn from the country’s government, which has explicitly targeted a significant reduction of inflows and has closed ports to NGO vessels that rescue immigrants crossing the Mediterranean from the shores of Africa. His comments were made in Italy’s lower house of parliament at the presentation of INPS’ annual report last week. Boeri said: “By closing our borders, we risk destroying our social protection system.”“A ruling class that lives up to its name must have the courage to tell Italians the truth: we need immigrants to keep our social protection system on its feet.” Tito Boeri, chair of Italian social security agency INPS“The inflows of migrant workers compensate the falling birth rates in our country, which is the gravest threat to the sustainability of our pension system”, commented Boeri. The system, he added, is geared to sustain a rise in longevity, but would be put at great risk by further reductions in the numbers of contributors, given the current demographic scenarios.Former labour and welfare minister Elsa Fornero, who designed a major reform of Italy’s pension system in 2011, told IPE: “We need immigrants, because our ratio of young workers in the labour force is shrinking.”She added: “My position has always been that we cannot think that immigrants alone can solve our problems in terms of pensions, by paying contributions and then perhaps going back to their countries of origin with a pension that is lower than the sum of contributions they paid in. “The focus must be on pension reform. But at the same time, we cannot do without a labour market that functions, which means low unemployment, but also a steady flow of immigrants.”See the July/August issue of IPE Magazine for more on pensions in Italylast_img read more

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Getting married before having children ‘boosts chances of staying together’ – study

first_imgThe Telegraph 9 March 2015Couples who get married before having children are more than 70 per cent more likely to stay together than those who do so after, new research claims.Meanwhile those who start a family but never marry are almost three times as likely to split up before their children are in their mid-teens, the study by the Marriage Foundation think-tank concludes.It claims that other factors often linked to family stability, such as parents’ ages when they have children or their level of education, have only a “marginal”, if any, effect on their chances of staying together.Sir Paul Coleridge, the former High Court family judge who set up the foundation in 2012, said the study showed that it is a “myth” that cohabitation is as stable as marriage.The group is pressing for political parties to adopt policies specifically promoting marriage in their manifestos ahead of the General Election in May.The study is based on analysis by Professor Stephen McKay of Lincoln University of data from Understanding Society, the research project tracking changes in tens of thousands of British households over time.It analyses a sample of 1,800 mothers with at least one child aged 14 or 15 who were interviewed in 2010 in detail about how their family was formed. http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/politics/11457510/Getting-married-before-having-children-boosts-chances-of-staying-together-study.htmllast_img read more

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Campbell urges Arsenal to sign Willian, Fraser

first_imgFormer Arsenal striker, Kevin Campbell, thinks it is time for the team to secure some bargains in the transfer market. Promoted Content5 Of The World’s Most Unique Theme ParksThe Highest Paid Football Players In The World6 Interesting Ways To Make Money With A Drone8 Fascinating Facts About Coffee10 Risky Jobs Some Women DoTV Characters Who Hated Each Other But Later Became FriendsCouples Who Celebrated Their Union In A Unique, Unforgettable WayA Soviet Shot Put Thrower’s Record Hasn’t Been Beaten To This DayWho’s The Best Car Manufacturer Of All Time?Who Is The Most Powerful Woman On Earth?7 Ways To Understand Your Girlfriend BetterThe Very Last Bitcoin Will Be Mined Around 2140. Read More Campbell added: “There’s talk of Willian, I like Willian, there’s still a lot of life left in him. He actually suits what Mikel Arteta wants to do, playing in a three, he’s got pace, he can beat people, he can score goals and we could get him on a free, and he’s experienced. “It ticks all the boxes, but I know some Arsenal fans saying, ‘We don’t want Chelsea’s cast-offs’, but he’s not a cast-off. “The problem with Chelsea is they’ve got young players coming through who need to play, who know now is the time where [Frank] Lampard’s come in with Jody Morris, it’s the transition where they have to play them now. “Whereas Willian is 31, still got life in him, he’s a similar age to [Pierre-Emerick] Aubameyang, no one is saying Aubameyang is over the hill, so how can Willian be over the hill? It doesn’t make sense. read also:Rivaldo: Chelsea winger Willian could succeed at Barcelona “If we haven’t got the money to spend in the transfer market, let’s get these guys on free, get them motivated and get them playing. That’s what Mikel Arteta’s got to do, and he realises if he hasn’t got the war chest then he’s going to have to move smart.” FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 While Gunners fans know they will have to spend big to reach the top of the Premier League, Campbell hopes some astute free transfers could help. The likes of Willian from Chelsea and Ryan Fraser from Bournemouth are out of contract this summer. Campbell told Metro: “You can get Ryan Fraser on a free transfer, his assists for Bournemouth were double figures last year, I know he suffered injuries but he’s still been having a decent season. “That’s playing for Bournemouth, when you’re playing for Arsenal he’s going to get more of the ball in the positions he wants and give more opportunities, because there’s a lot more threats for Arsenal than some of these other teams.”Advertisement Loading… last_img read more

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Ronaldo dominates Serie A top earners

first_imgRelatedPosts Live stream Premier League, La Liga, Serie A on Showmax Pro this weekend Juve’s Pirlo gamble makes new Serie A season the most open for years Pirlo bags UEFA coaching badge Cristiano Ronaldo is earning £28 million-a-year in wages at Juventus after taxes, three times what Matthijs de Ligt gets as the second highest earner in Serie A, according to Gazzetta dello Sport. Juventus’ new summer signing de Ligt takes home £7.2million-a-year plus bonuses, jumping up above the likes of Paulo Dybala and Gonzalo Higuain to take up his spot behind Ronaldo. Third spot in the list is taken up by another Serie A newcomer, Romelu Lukaku, who is getting £6.7million-a-year plus bonuses after joining Inter Milan from Manchester United this summer. Of course, Ronaldo earns far more than his wages due to his global status. Nike alone pays him £14.68m-a-year, and he will also receive performance-based bonuses. Juventus understandably take up the bulk of the list of top earners, with nine of their players appearing in the top 10. Only Lukaku and Inter break that mould. Juventus have won eight Serie A titles in a row, so can afford to spend big money on the players they need to keep their run going. They reportedly spend £264million-a-year on player wages. Aaron Ramsey is another name they have brought in this year, with the Welshman on £6.3million-a-year since joining on a free transfer after his contract with Arsenal ended. Adrien Rabiot joined from PSG this summer, and he too has broken into the top 10, earning the same as Ramsey plus bonuses. With all these new arrivals, the likes of Dybala, Higuain, Miralem Pjanic, Douglas Costa, Mario Mandzukic, and Sami Khedira have all found themselves dropping down the list of best paid footballers in Italy. Not far off the top 10 is AC Milan goalkeeper Gianluigi Donnarumma, who earns £5.4million-a-year, and Napoli’s Kalidou Koulibaly earns the same.Tags: Cristiano RonaldoGazzetta dello SportJuventus FCMatthijs de LigtSerie Alast_img read more

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Students debate fracking

first_imgFollow us on Twitter @dailytrojan On Wednesday afternoon, the USC Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics in partnership with the Schwarzenegger Institute held its second Students Talk Back of the semester. The weekly forums allow students to engage in discussion about a political issue.This week, experts discussed policies on hydraulic fracturing, or “fracking,” the process of using high-pressure water to fracture rocks, extracting from the shale reserves underneath. The debate-like format of the discussion allowed for investigation into the issue.The event panel consisted of students Kelsey Harrison, a senior majoring in political science, and Jake Jordan, a senior majoring in international relations (global business) and professionals Dave Quast, the California Director of Energy in Depth, a pro-petroleum think tank, and Brenna Norton, the Southern California Operator from Food & Water Watch, an anti-fracking advocate. Daniel Rothberg, an editor at the Daily Trojan, and Dan Schnur, director of the USC Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics, co-moderated the debate.Before the event, Ivan Kumamoto, a sophomore majoring in business administration, shared why he attended the forum.“I expect to find out more about recent developments in the natural gas industry and if … environmental concerns [have] changed at all.”The debate was not without tension.“Hopefully, we have a legitimate level of intellectual honesty. Because a lot of the discussion on [the oil industry’s] side of the debate has, in my opinion, been false or preposterous,” Kumamoto said after learning of Quast’s affiliation with Energy in Depth.Both sides were asked to define fracking before launching into the debate.“I know what the oil and gas industry tells what fracking is. But, in the bigger picture, fracking has come to mean the whole process, the trucking in of thousand gallons of water, all the sand they have to move to extract from that well, all the waste water that comes up from the process, radioactive material that comes up from fracking,” Norton said.Quast defined fracking as “the injection of fluid at depth.”“It takes place in a heavily regulated environment in the state level. Hydraulic fracturing is not a new thing. It has been going on since the Truman administration,” he said.Norton’s main points included environmental concerns at increased oil production, lack of regulation and contamination. She was in favor of a ban on fracking all together.Harrison presented a study that she had helped to conduct. According to the study by USC and the Los Angeles Times, 41 percent of L.A. Democrats and 43 percent of Republicans were in favor of regulated fracking, and 14 percent were in favor of all forms of fracking.Quast held that a ban on fracking would disrupt economies and harm the industry. He also held that fracking, as a process, is safe.“There’s never been a single case of water contamination,” Quast said.Alec White, a sophomore majoring political science, found the event insightful.“I found most interesting that fracking will not contribute to the cost of gasoline at all. That puts me on the side against fracking,” White said.last_img read more

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No. 2 Badgers fall to Duke, lose chance at top-five win

first_imgWednesday’s game between No. 2 Wisconsin and No. 4 Duke was just the second top-five matchup in Kohl Center history and arguably the most highly anticipated matchup of the college basketball season thus far.While both teams went back-and-forth in the first half and the majority of the second half, the Blue Devils (8-0) eventually pulled away from the Badgers (7-1) — shooting 65.2 percent from the floor in the process — to hand UW its first loss of the season, 80-70.Blue Devils potent offense overwhelms BadgersIt is very rare for an opposing team to leave the Kohl Center victorious. It’s even more rare for an Read…“We beat a really good basketball team today,” Duke head coach Mike Krzyzewski said. “Our defense was good and then our offensive efficiency was incredible tonight.”In the second half, Duke opened up their biggest lead of the game of nine points when senior guard Quinn Cook hit a jumper to put the Blue Devils up 58-49. But the Badgers battled back with senior guard Traevon Jackson leading the charge.Jackson scored 13 of UW’s next 16 points including two free throws that pulled the Badgers within three at 60-63. However Duke would continue to hit its shots and free throws at the end, preventing UW from getting within six points the final 3:42 of the game.“It was close but we never made them nervous at all,” Jackson, who finished with a career-high 25 points on 7-of-12 shooting said. “They always had like a comfortable six-point lead.”Other than Jackson, the only other player in double figures for the Badgers was forward Frank Kaminsky who finished with 17 points. Forwards Nigel Hayes and Sam Dekker — who came into Wednesday’s game both averaging 13.6 points — finished with a combined nine total points.Early on, Kaminsky was double-teamed in the post whenever he touched the ball but that eventually led to him getting some early open looks from beyond the arc. He hit his first two three-pointers of the game but after that he would only attempt two more threes, missing both attempts.“I was able to get some things early,” Kaminsky said. “But that closed off pretty quickly and we were able to do some other things. [Jackson] did a great job of playing off the ball screens. He was able to knock down some shots and make some big plays but at the end of the day it wasn’t enough.”Overall, the Blue Devils went 30-for-45 from the field and 7-for-12 (58.3 percent) from beyond the arc. Duke hit its shots when they counted the most, shooting 71.4 percent in the second half.For Wisconsin head coach Bo Ryan, he didn’t see his team playing poor defense; it was just a matter of Duke having a strong shooting night.“They hit some tough shots, but they have good enough players that can do that at times,” Ryan said. “To have as many do it in the same night, that’s just not fair. They were lights out.”Coming into Wednesday’s game, all the hype was surrounding Duke freshman Jahil Okafor who is considered one of the best players in the country and picked by many to be the first pick in the NBA Draft this summer. While Okafor did finish with 13 points, it was another freshman, guard Tyus Jones, who stole the show for the Blue Devils.Jones went 7-for-11 from the floor, including 2-of-3 from beyond the arc and 6-of-8 from the free throw line to lead Duke in scoring with 22 points. Junior Rasheed Sulaimon (14) and senior Quinn Cook (13) rounded out the Duke players scoring in double figures.But it was simply Okafor’s presence that opened things up for his teammates, specifically Jones.“They do a good job on their ball screens with Okafor. You have to compensate something for him,” Jackson said. “Good players are going to make plays in big moments like that so [Jones] played a heck of a game.”Early in the first half, the Badgers had trouble working the ball inside but more than made up for it, scoring their first 12 points on four three-pointers. Kaminsky scored the first six points for UW and freshman guard Bronson Koenig knocked in a three from the corner to put Wisconsin on top 12-9. Despite their four early threes, the Badgers did not make another one of their 13 total attempts in the first half.After Koenig’s three, the Blue Devils came back, tying the score at 12 on a Sulaimon three. Eventually Duke took a 26-20 lead — their largest of the first half — before the Badgers came roaring back on a 6-0 run to tie it at 26 thanks to four points from sophomore forward Vitto Brown and two from forward Duje Dukan.Following the 6-0 run by UW, Duke responded and knocked down back-to-back-to-back three-pointers to finish the half shooting 15-for-25 (60 percent) from the floor, taking a 35-32 lead into halftime.Despite the loss, Ryan and his team will use what they learned in this game to improve going forward. It was a strong early-season test for the Badgers that should pay off as conference play approaches.“[Duke’s] better than us right now. There’s no question,” Ryan said. “We have to shore some things up but a great game to have clips of things that we need to work on.”The Badgers will get their next opportunity to pick up their eighth win of the season Saturday in Milwaukee when they take on in-state rival Marquette.last_img read more

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