2 Suffolk Jail Officers Charged With Beating Inmate

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Two Suffolk County Corrections Officers were indicted last month on charges of allegedly assaulting an inmate at the county jail in Riverhead three years ago, prosecutors said.From left: Vincent Cennamo and Mark Nicol.Vincent Cennamo, 53, of Moriches, and his co-defendant, 46-year-old Mark Nicol of Ronkonkoma, were charged with assault. Cennamo was also charged with falsifying business records, offering a false instrument for filing and official misconduct. Both men pleaded not guilty Thursday at Suffolk County court.Prosecutors alleged the two officers assaulted 32-year-old Joshua Durkel, who was serving a sentence for a probation violation after a drug conviction, in the jail’s kitchen on Nov. 27, 2013.Cennamo then allegedly made false entries in an incident report claiming Durkel, who now lives in Florida, slipped and suffered a cut above his right eyebrow when he hit his head on a stove, according to investigators.Judge Timothy Mazzei released both men without bail. They are due back in court on March 29. Both officers were suspended without pay.last_img read more

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Disrupt yourself?

first_imgHave you been challenged to be disruptive? Have you been told you will be disrupted? Tired of the “disruptive” rhetoric? We sure are … but disruption is nonetheless an important topic of conversation. There is, however, a critical understanding of disruption necessary in order to truly define and embrace disruptive influences and actions. Curious? Read on.Disruption vs IterationWhen it comes to disruption, the first thing to understand is the difference between disruption and iteration. In Clayton M. Christensen’s 1997 book “The Innovator’s Solution,” a disruptive innovation is an “innovation that creates a new market and value network that will eventually disrupt an already existing market and replace an existing product.” In contrast, an iteration is an improvement in an existing product that seeks to maintain the existing market and value network. Take a look at industry dialogue on “disruption.” What passes for “disruptive” dialogue in today’s credit union community is not really about disruption, but about making iterative – preservative – improvements.The Credit Union Industry ChallengeIf we are really talking disruption, then what we seek are products and services that do away with those we currently offer consumers. Given the intent of disruption, however, perhaps iteration is a safer strategy. After all, who in their right mind would want to create something that kills existing business? The challenge credit unions face, of course, is that if credit unions themselves aren’t disrupting the business, someone else will.For an example we can turn to Christensen’s first book “The Innovator’s Dilemma: When New Technologies Cause Great Firms to Fail.” His main source of research is the hard drive industry, whose entrenched firms were “attacked from below” by firms offering smaller, cheaper drives that were slower and offered less capacity. For the entrenched firms, their strategy was not to develop products that customers didn’t want, which described the smaller drives. Rather, their strategy was to continue to make improvements to the existing drives customers loved. In other words, they made slight iterative changes to their products.This strategy worked … until those disruptive products replaced the business all together. In Christensen’s retelling, firm after firm faltered as drives that no one wanted all of a sudden became what everyone wanted.When we think of “disruption” in banking we again say that most “disruptive activity” focuses on subtle, iterative changes to the status quo. As a credit union consulting firm, we’ve also noticed something else quite interesting: credit unions are hardly iterating, let alone disrupting, the products that serve as the highest, most prevalent source of revenue – loans. Why? It’s safer not to (though we’d guess that most people would blame regulators for stymying change).Let’s take a look at lending specifically. If we really want to be disruptive, perhaps we should think about what firms we’re on record as despising are doing in the world – payday lenders, check cashers, etc. The ethics of these businesses aside, they are filling a consumer need for special purpose loans and services at amounts that most credit unions and banks shy away from. In the context of the hard drive industry, these firms offer the smaller, less profitable hard drives. Regulations are certainly pressuring the nation’s payday lenders and check cashers, but other resources are popping up to handle demand (consumer and small business) for short-term, small-dollar loans that are easy to obtain.Most credit unions and banks don’t like these kids of loans because, under existing policies, procedures, customer/member relationships, and balance sheet strategy, they don’t make financial sense. In addition, existing products can do what those smaller loan types can do and more. Why add something with such limited functionality and at such low margins?You will find the same defensive viewpoint uttered by those failed hard drive firms mentioned in “The Innovator’s Dilemma.” That viewpoint, however, is powerful and it easily overwhelms an institution to the point that it makes it extremely easy to dismiss such competitors and their simple products.Disruption Doesn’t Make Sense – But Is It Necessary?When it comes to whether you want to be disruptive as a credit union or simply iterative in your thinking, the first step is to make a decision about what you’re after. Do you want to disrupt your existing market and/or replace your existing products? Or, would you rather improve existing products to support and satisfy existing members? The difference between the two questions is important because, upon making a decision, the response to each question will take you distinctly different places.When making the initial decision of whether to be disruptive or iterative in your strategic efforts, or to decide whether disruption is even necessary, you will need to broadly explore your competitive environment. Such exploration should include the products and services that members and potential members are actually using – at your credit union and elsewhere. You may find you have no choice but to be disruptive, in which case you will need to begin the hard work of retooling your credit union to respond to the emerging threat posed by disruptive competitors.What About Innovation?Often within the same exploration of disruption you will hear of the need to innovate. The question is, “innovate what?” Your research into disruption vs. iteration will help you better understand innovation. If you face little threat of disruption and you possess a demanding, growing, thriving member base, then innovative research and effort should be directed at finding ways to improve products/services and delivery methods. If, on the other hand, disruption is necessary, then innovation must be focused on successful disruption. To put it bluntly, innovating to innovate is a worthless endeavor. There should be a context for innovation.Disruption vs. iteration offers such a framework.For a more lengthy, detailed, exploration of ideas regarding disruptive strategy we’d recommend picking up one of Christensen’s Innovators Dilemma books.The Importance of Board and Senior Management EngagementWho bears responsibility for sparking and/or supporting dialogue about disruption? The board and senior management. Christensen notes that disruptive ideas are most often the inspiration of rank-and-file employees, but as the ideas move up the chain of command they are killed because they “don’t make sense” and therefore lack support for continued exploration. That this is the common response to disruptive challenges suggests senior management and board must go out of their way to nurture staff-inspired ideas and also develop their own ideas about disruption.At the end of the day, success – if not survival – requires constant change. Sometimes drastic, disruptive change is necessary, and sometimes iterative, subtle change is necessary. The question is knowing what type of change your credit union needs, and whether you’re ready for it. 15SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Tom Glatt Jr Tom Glatt, Jr. is founder of Glatt Consulting, a credit union consulting firm specializing in strategy consulting for credit union leaders. Tom applies his 19 years’ experience in the credit … Web: www.glattconsulting.com Detailslast_img read more

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Blood test for prion diseases reported

first_imgAug 29, 2005 (CIDRAP News) – Scientists in Texas report they have found a way to detect abnormal prion protein in blood, an achievement that could lead to the first practical blood test for bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) and similar diseases in living animals. At present, BSE and related prion diseases, called transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs), can be definitively diagnosed only by examination of brain tissue after death. In the United Kingdom, BSE spread through cattle herds in the 1980s and early 1990s and led to more than 150 cases of vCJD in people, presumably as a result of eating beef from infected animals. The United States has had two BSE cases so far. In its current form, PMCA testing takes several days to yield a highly sensitive result, the report says. The authors say they expect to further increase the speed of the test. The method is called protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA). It involves separating the “buffy coat” portion of a blood sample, adding a dose of normal prion protein from brain tissue to it, incubating the preparation at 37˚C, exposing it to sound waves, and repeating the process many times. If abnormal prion protein is present, it causes the normal prions to convert to the abnormal, misfolded form, forming small clumps, the report says. The sonic treatment breaks up the clumps into smaller bits, stimulating further conversion as the cycle is repeated. After a number of rounds of PMCA, the abnormal protein can be detected by an existing test, such as the Western blot. According to an Associated Press report, Soto also said he hopes to evaluate the test in animals that have been naturally infected with a TSE and in animals that have asymptomatic infections. The test was used successfully to detect a prion disease in hamsters. If it proves effective in cattle and humans, it could help protect the blood supply from BSE, help determine the prevalence of the disease in US cattle, and assist researchers trying to assess how many people are unwittingly infected with variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD), the human equivalent of BSE. In a UTMB news release, Soto commented, “The next step, which we’re currently working on, will be detecting prions in the blood of animals before they develop clinical symptoms and applying the technology to human blood samples.” The authors described the basic process in previous reports, and in the new article they write that they found a way to automate the process to speed it up and increase the number of cycles.center_img The researchers predict that the development of a similar blood test for humans will have a “tremendous impact” on the beef industry, the safety of blood and blood products, and estimation of the number of vCJD cases. They suggest that the test could permit the diagnosis and treatment of vCJD early in its course, before the appearance of clinical signs and permanent brain damage. The disease is currently untreatable and always fatal. To evaluate the test, they used 12 healthy hamsters and 18 hamsters that had clinical signs of scrapie (the sheep form of TSE) after being inoculated with infected brain tissue. After six rounds of PMCA, abnormal prion protein was detected in blood samples from 16 of the 18 sick hamsters, but not in any of the samples from healthy hamsters. The findings signify 89% sensitivity and 100% specificity for the test. “Our findings represent the first time that prions have been biochemically detected in blood,” the authors state. Because the test appears to be highly accurate, it “offers promise for the design of a sensitive biochemical test for blood diagnosis of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies.” Castilla J, Saa P, Soto C. Detection of prions in blood. Nature Medicine 2005; early online release [Abstract]http://www.nature.com/nm/journal/v11/n9/abs/nm1286.html The new blood test was developed by Claudio Soto and two colleagues at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston (UTMB). Writing in Nature Medicne, they report that they devised a way to stimulate a tiny, undetectable amount of abnormal prion protein in a blood sample to multiply so that it reaches detectable levels. Because TSEs take years to produce symptoms, it is feared that many more Britons were infected unknowingly and will fall ill in the years ahead. The discovery in Britain of a few possible cases of transmission of vCJD through blood transfusions has fueled more concern.last_img read more

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First human trial of Oxford coronavirus vaccine shows promise

first_imgTopics : The vaccine from AstraZeneca and Britain’s University of Oxford prompted no serious side effects and elicited antibody and T-cell immune responses, according to trial results published in The Lancet medical journal, with the strongest response seen in people who received two doses.British Prime Minister Boris Johnson, whose government has helped fund the project, hailed the results as “very positive news” though the researchers cautioned the project was still at an early stage.”There is still much work to be done before we can confirm if our vaccine will help manage the COVID-19 pandemic,” vaccine developer Sarah Gilbert said. “We still do not know how strong an immune response we need to provoke to effectively protect against SARS-CoV-2 infection.”AstraZeneca shares surged 10%, but then gave up most of those gains, to close up 1.45% on the day. An experimental vaccine being developed by AstraZeneca and Oxford University against the new coronavirus produced an immune response in early-stage clinical trials, data showed on Monday, preserving hopes it could be in use by the end of the year.The vaccine, called AZD1222, has been described by the World Health Organization’s chief scientist as the leading candidate in a global race to halt a pandemic that has killed more than 600,000 people.More than 150 possible vaccines are in various stages of development, and US drugmaker Pfizer and China’s CanSino Biologics also reported positive responses for their candidates on Monday.center_img AstraZeneca has signed agreements with governments around the world to supply the vaccine should it prove effective and gain regulatory approval. It has said it will not seek to profit from the vaccine during the pandemic.AZD1222 was developed by Oxford and licensed to AstraZeneca, which has put it into large-scale, late-stage trials to test its efficacy. It has signed deals to produce and supply over 2 billion doses of the shot, with 300 million doses earmarked for the United States.Pascal Soriot, Chief Executive of AstraZeneca, said the company was on track to be producing doses by September, but that hopes that it will be available this year hinged on how quickly late-stage trials could be completed, given the dwindling prevalence of the virus in Britain.Late-stage trials are under way in Brazil and South Africa and are due to start in the United States, where prevalence is higher.Targeting two dosesThe trial results showed a stronger immune response in 10 people given an extra dose of the vaccine after 28 days, echoing a trial in pigs.Oxford’s Gilbert said the early-stage trial could not determine whether one or two doses would be needed to provide immunity.”It may be that we don’t need two doses, but we want to know what we can achieve,” she told reporters.AstraZeneca’s biopharma chief, Mene Pangalos, said the firm was leaning towards a two-dose strategy for later-stage trials, and did not want to risk a single or lower dose that might not work. The antibody levels generated were “in the region” of those seen in convalescent patients, he said.The trial included 1,077 healthy adults aged 18-55 years with no history of COVID-19. Researchers said the vaccine caused minor side effects more frequently than a control group, but some of these could be reduced by taking the painkiller paracetamol, which is also known as acetaminophen.last_img read more

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Governor Wolf Urges Final Passage of Animal Protection Overhaul Including Libre’s Law

first_imgGovernor Wolf Urges Final Passage of Animal Protection Overhaul Including Libre’s Law June 20, 2017 Animal Welfare,  Press Release,  Statement Harrisburg, PA – Governor Tom Wolf today released the following statement urging the Senate to send House Bill 1238 – an overhaul of Pennsylvania’s animal abuse law including Libre’s Law – to his desk for his signature:“I am proud to be a long-time supporter of Libre’s Law and eager to sign the bipartisan, comprehensive House Bill 1238 into law. I applaud the sponsors and advocates who have fought for too long to improve Pennsylvania’s protections for animals. This bill increases penalties for animal cruelty and neglect. Pennsylvania is only one of three states that does not have a felony statute for severe animal abuse. We are long overdue to join the rest of the country in having higher standards of care for our pets and other animals. I thank Libre, the Pennsylvania SPCA, Sen. Alloway, Rep. Stephens, and all those in the legislature and animal advocacy community for their work getting this bill towards final passage.”center_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

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Who Should Make the First Move?.

first_imgLifestyleRelationships Who Should Make the First Move?. by: – June 28, 2011 33 Views   no discussions Share Sharing is caring! Sharecenter_img Tweet Share by Rich Santos, Marie ClairePhoto Credit: Neil KirkHe Said…The other day my friend asked me how I’d react if a girl asked me out. I told her I’d be ecstatic, because it would take away all of the work I had to do: the waiting 2.038 days to call her, the wondering, the worrying, figuring out what to say on the phone. But then I took a step back and realized that every girl who has asked me out, I’ve said yes to regardless of whether I was interested or not. I like to give everyone a shot, and I totally respect a girl who finds me attractive enough to ask out. So, yes, guys love it when a girl takes the initiative. But just remember that the same problem exists for you if you ask us out: We might just say yes and unintentionally give you the wrong idea. Bottom line, it is fair game for either gender to make the move, and it’s always good to shake things up! So, go ahead — keep us on our toes.She Said…Anyone should be able to make the first move. There is only one first move that is the grandest of them all — the very first initial interaction that signals interest between couples. That can come with a handshake, a flirty smile, the passing of a business card, or the inquiry for a phone number. A woman might make a perceivably smaller first move than a man might. She’ll engage more in conversation with him but may not ask for the phone number. Her first subtle move, however, signals him to make the bolder second move. That same scenario can work in the reverse way as well. As long as men and women stay within their comfort zones when plotting a first move, there isn’t much chance for it to go wrong. As long as we read the signals correctly, the eventual first move should end up in our favor, no matter who is taking the initial step.last_img read more

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Byrne red-hot in Republic’s draw

first_imgGoalkeeper Emma Byrne was the hero as the Republic of Ireland’s women kept their faint hopes of World Cup qualification alive. Press Association Ireland skipper Byrne produced important saves at the end of either half as the Republic battled their way to a 0-0 draw with Russia in Krasnoarmeysk to remain five points adrift of their second-placed opponents in Group 1 with three games each to play. The visitors’ best chance fell to Fiona O’Sullivan on the stroke of half-time, but she was denied by Russia ‘keeper Elvira Todua, and the Republic had to defend resiliently all the way to the whistle to claim a well-earned point. last_img read more

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Thrilling End to Wichtech Tennis Tournament

first_imgThe evening game ended with the men’s doubles and it came as a little surprise to many that the duo of Godwin Kienka and Adino Tochukwu got the better of Chinedu Idike and Akeem Mustafa.An elated Nwankwo said after the encounter after, he would not relent in his sponsorship of the competition, promising to make the next edition bigger.“We are now partners,” he said. Member of the tennis section danced to live band to bring the competition to a thrilling end.Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegram The fourth edition of the Wichtech Tennis Tournament ended last Saturday at the Tennis Section of the Ikoyi Club 1938 with lots of funfair.The tournament which was modeled alongside tennis Grand Slam saw participants carting away various prizes and trophies to the delight of the sponsors, Chinedu Nwankwo, Chairman Wichtech Industries limited. In the Men’s Singles A, Captain of the tennis section, Akeem Mustafa defeated Ezomo Imoukwede, 6-0, 6-4, while Chido Nwankwo got the better of Labisi Aboyomi in the Men’s Singles B.In the veterans’ finals, Charles Attah defeated Olowe Olaleye 6-3, 6-4 and in the super veteran singles, Chris Akpunonu out served Walter Jibunoh 6-2, 6-2, while in the ladies single Julie Allagonyi outplayed Clara Falase in two straight sets.last_img read more

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Mid Tipp Senior Hurling semi-final draw

first_imgMid champions Drom Inch will face near neIghbours and county champions Thurles Sarsfields.In the other semi final 2013 county champions Loughmore Castleiney will take on the winners of the clash between JK Brackens and Moycarkey.Meanwhile the quarter-final draw has been made in North Tipp. Lorrha face Kildangan, Ballina come up against Templederry, Roscrea meet Silvermines and Portroe await either Kilruane or Toomevara.last_img

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Essien and 11 others arrive for Zambia match

first_imgGhana’s preparations for Friday’s 2014 FIFA World Cup qualifying against Zambia will commence this afternoon after players arrived over the weekend.Kwesi Appiah’s team will hold their first training session at the Accra Sports Stadium, Monday afternoon.Twelve players – captain Asamoah Gyan, Albert Adomah, Rashid Sumaila, Mahatma Otoo, Kwadwo Asamoah, Jonathan Mensah, Razak Braimah, Awal Mohammed, Fatau Dauda, Chrsitian Atsu, Michael Essien and Mubarak Wakaso – have arrived in the Black Stars team hotel.There will be more player arrivals later in the evening.The Black Stars are in first place and one point better than Zambia on the Group D table ahead of their final meeting at the Baba Yara Stadium in Kumasi.Winners of the second round stage will advance to the final round where ten sides will be paired off for the final stage during October and November with the winners of the five home-and-away ties qualifying for Brazil 2014.last_img read more

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