Parents protest

first_imgMae’s 42% fee hike…call for Govt’s interventionAs the lunch break saw children playing in the nearby playground, about 20 parents with children attending the institution staged a peaceful picketing exercise in front of the Mae’s Schools at Third Avenue, Subryanville, Georgetown, calling for the administration to meet with them to discuss the hike in fees.Some of the outraged parents outside the Mae’s Schools on MondayThe parents claim that just before school closed for Easter, they received notice indicating school fees for the Christmas term will be increased by up to 42 per cent, depending on the Grade.Spokesperson for the parents, Shenera Sam, said parents are not against a reasonable increase, but the current figures are almost exploitative. She said she has two children attending the institution, and she cannot afford an extra $25,000 in fees when she has to pay as much as $50,000 for textbooks.“At this point in time my standard of living has not increased; therefore, I cannot go to my (bosses) and tell them that I now have $25,000 more in expense, that they should increase my salary. So I am here, and I will stand here for as long as I can, until the administrators decide to speak with us, come up with a reasonable increase,” she said.She opined that the move to increase the fees was a calculated one, since registration at other private schools has already closed.“What I found is that it was strategically done, so there is no way we can get these children in private schools, because all the private schools have had registration…I am very optimistic that some compassion would come up somewhere along the line in terms of the administrators, and they will find a way to help us, or for us to work it out. But what is ironic is that this same administration stood with us when we were opposing the 14 per cent VAT,” Sam noted.Additionally, Sam said the more than 170 parents are hopeful that the Government would see it fit to intervene and provide them with some satisfaction.“There are no laws or institutions governing private schools. I called the Competition and Consumer Affairs and they said because we don’t have a written contract with the school, there is nothing they can really do for us. So, we are hoping (that) with us coming out and protest, that somehow the Government would find it in their heart to intervene and help us,” Sam related.Meanwhile, at last week’s post-Cabinet press briefing, State Minister Joseph Harmon said the matter has not engaged the attention of Cabinet, but he did note that the arrangement between the private institutions and the parents is private. However, he said the Education Ministry would have to look at the increase to determine whether it was an unreasonable imposition.Mae’s Administrator, Stacey French, has said the increase is due to the school’s increased costs to do business, as well as the challenge of hiring teachers who are both motivated and experienced, in addition to overall operational costs.Another parent, Mark Singh, told the Guyana Times that the parents are out to protest since the school’s administration has been ignoring their request to meet. He said his two children are in Upper Playgroup and Upper Nursery, and he would have to find an additional $30,000 to pay when the new term comes.He explained that it is his preference to send his children to a private school, but he would not allow himself to be exploited.Meanwhile, a grandmother, Mrs Reid, (only name given) said she has four grandchildren attending the institution and that their mother is already contemplating enrolling them in the public school system.“If they raise their fees they put on a $5,000, but $15,000 is too much! The facilities (are not good), the toilet is dripping water and the ceiling leaking…$1 million a year is too much; people isn’t working for that,” she said.The parents have also called for an interim body to manage the affairs of private schools.Then Education Minister, Priya Manickchand, had tabled the Education Bill of 2014, which was read in Parliament in 2014. Then in 2017, the MoE had said the regularisation of all private education institutions will be provided for under the new Education Act.When contacted concerning the status of the new Education Act, the Education Ministry (MoE) said, “The matter has to engage Cabinet, Opposition and all other stakeholders on the matter reference to the Bill.”Additionally, the MoE was unable to confirm or deny whether the situation at the school in regard to fees was being liked into.This is not the first time that parents of children attending the Mae’s Schools are protesting a decision by the school’s administration. In May of 2016, several parents of students in Grade 5 staged a protest, claiming that they had paid $20,000 for extra lessons that were not being delivered.last_img read more

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Napoli striker Milik robbed at gunpoint after Liverpool win

first_imgThe two assailants — whose faces were entirely covered by helmets — approached the footballer’s car and pointed a gun at him, ordering him to hand over his Rolex Daytona watch worth 7,000 euros ($8,000).The robbers then sped into the countryside towards Licola, police said according to the AGI news agency.As soon as he recovered from the shock, Milik went to the nearest police station to report the crime.Attacks on professional players in the southern Italian city are frequent.Italian international Lorenzo Insigne was robbed of jewelry, cash and a luxury watch in 2016 and the club’s Slovakian captain, Marek Hamsik, was held up at gunpoint in the centre of the city four years ago.Napoli beat last year’s Champions League finalists 1-0 with a 90th-minute Insigne goal to go top of Group C.0Shares0000(Visited 3 times, 1 visits today) 0Shares0000Napoli striker Arkadiusz Milik was robbed at gunpoint after his team’s Champions League win over Liverpool in Naples. © AFP / CARLO HERMANNNAPLES, Italy, Oct 4 – Napoli’s Polish striker Arkadiusz Milik was robbed at gunpoint on his way home after his team’s Champions League win over Liverpool, Italian police said on Thursday.The 24-year-old was in his car heading towards his home at Varcaturo on the Domitian Coast 20km west of Naples at around 2am when his car was stopped by a high-powered motorcycle blocking the road.last_img read more

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Horoya blinds Bandari’s shot at history

first_imgThe dockers had two different halves; quick and attacking in the opening 45, then slow and sluggish in the final stanza of the game as the visitors took their best chance of the game in the 66th minute.Knowing a two goal climb awaited them to ascend, Bandari had a strong start to the match and as early as the first minute should have been celebrating the first goal.Abdallah Hassan took on a good run on the right before delivering a dicey cutback, but William Wadri who was aptly positioned on the penalty spot swung the ball inches over on the first take.-Horoya chance Horoya AC striker Aristide Bance vies for the ball with Bandari’s Brian Otieno during their CAF Confederations Cup play-off round match at the Kasarani Stadium on November 3, 2019. PHOTO/Raymond MakhayaHoroya had a chance in the sixth minute when the Bandari defense was found on the back foot. But, the visitors could not take advantage as Bolaji Sakin took too much time on the ball allowing Fred Nkata to track back and bully him off the ball.The home side employed a strategy to be quick off the ball and they launched attacks forward, but couldn’t take advantage of any spaces accorded to them.Twice, the Horoya defense fluffed in clearing their lines inside the box, but both Abdallah and Mwamba could not make the most of the gifts laid up infront of them like a bouquet of flowers.They once again dodged a bullet in the 25th minute when off a corner, the ball fell on Dramane Nikiema but the pint sized attacker’s shot was deflected by a forest of legs thrown his way for another corner that wasn’t of much threat.The dockers launched a quick counter in the 31st minute with Abdallah’s deft touch leaving his marker gasping for a piece of his shirt which he couldn’t get. The forward surged up at goal, but was hacked down 20 yards off, winning his side a set piece.But, Wadri’s effort at goal flew straight to Horoya keeper Camara Moussa’s waiting arms.-Keeper outBandari’s Yema Mwamba tries to win the ball against Horoya AC’s Godfrey Asante during their CAF Confederations Cup play-off round match at the Kasarani Stadium on November 3, 2019. PHOTO/Raymond MakhayaThree minutes later, the dockers had another glorious opportunity when Wadri picked out Yema Mwamba with a sleek pass, but the Congolese forward could not get the ball on target with the keeper off his line.On the other end, six minutes to half time, Aristide Bance who had been closely monitored by the Bandari defense had his first sniff at goal with a freekick from the edge of the box that was saved by keeper Mustafa Oduor, standing in for the injured Mike Wanyika.But in the second half, Bandari seemed to have come back feet off the gas peddles. Four minutes in, Mandela swung in a low cross from the right but Morlaye Sylla’s connection was straight to the keeper from close range.Sakin had a similar chance this time from Sylla’s cutback but he blasted the ball over.Bandari’s ship finally cunk in the 66th minute when Mandela beat the offside trap, drove in and sent a low shot past keeper Oduor to break the deadlock and increase the height of the mountain Bandari had to scale.He should have had a brace but had a late chance saved one on one by Oduor, but it didn’t matter as they held on to pick victory and advance to the group stage.0Shares0000(Visited 27 times, 1 visits today) 0Shares0000Horoya AC players celebrate their goal during the CAF Confederations Cup play-off round match against Bandari FC at the Moi Sports Centre Kasarani on November 3, 2019. PHOTO/Timothy OlobuluNAIROBI, Kenya, Nov 3 – Skipper Mandela Ocansey hit the decisive goal as West African giants Horoya AC from Guinea beat Kenya’s FA Cup Champions Bandari FC 1-0 on the afternoon and 5-2 on aggregate to halt the dockers’ quest for a first ever spot in the CAF Confederations Cup group stages.A porous Horoya backline constantly gave Bandari room to penetrate, but the dockers couldn’t just make use of the opportunities as a chance of a historic place in the group stages of continental football slipped right through their fingers like dry sand on a sunny Mombasa evening.last_img read more

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Hacker grabbed `share’ of business

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREWhicker: Clemson demonstrates that it’s tough to knock out the champThe kiosks are usually found in hotel business centers and offer customers pay-as-you-go computer access for such things as word processing or the Internet. As part of Tandiwidjojo’s scheme, he set up a shell company named Showplace Business Centers Inc., which received the profits from the crime. The investigation began in April when a representative from another kiosk operator, Shuttlepoint, reported to the FBI that two of its kiosks were tampered with. The terminals were modified so that users would be directed to an unauthorized Web site to enter their payment information, according to the complaint filed against Tandiwidjojo. However, the modification was not successful because it caused the kiosks to shut down. Shuttlepoint also informed the FBI that another company, Showcase, also had similar incidents. A Lomita man admitted Tuesday in federal court that he hacked into computers inside business kiosks at hotels and stole users’ credit card information. Hario Tandiwidjojo, 28, pleaded guilty in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles to one count of unauthorized access to a protected computer to conduct fraud. The Indonesian national faces a maximum penalty of five years in federal prison when he returns to Judge Gary Feess’ courtroom for sentencing March 3. However, as part of a plea agreement, his sentence likely will range from 10 to 16 months. Tandiwidjojo told the court that he hacked into approximately 60 computers operated by Torrance-based Showcase Business Centers Inc. Showcase CEO Paul Rajewski said that 60 of its kiosks were compromised during a three-day period in February. He estimated that more than 300 customers might have had their credit card information taken during that time. In June, one of Showcase’s customers reported fraudulent activity on her credit card. Two transactions showed money paid to Tandiwidjojo’s imposter company and two more were for merchants in the Torrance area, the complaint states. The financial transactions led investigators to Tandiwidjojo. During a search of his home in the 2000 block of 250th Street, investigators found a credit card writer and fake bank and gift cards made with the stolen information. Tandiwidjojo admitted he compromised the Showcase kiosks by installing software that captured the user’s information and sent it to servers he controlled. He also admitted he unsuccessfully tried to do the same with Shuttlepoint’s kiosks. “Tandiwidjojo stated that he decided to `share’ Showcase Business Centers’ business but without informing the company of what he was doing,” the complaint states. He set up the computers to double charge users so Showcase got paid, but so did he, he said, according to the complaint. Prosecutors say he stole $34,266 in that three-day period in February. denise.nix@dailybreeze.com160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img
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GAA NEWS: DUNGLOE MINORS EARN SUPERB CHAMPIONSHIP WIN AWAY TO ARDARA

first_imgDungloe GAA News:B’ iad 11, 22, 23 agus 24 a huimhireacha lotto a tarraingíodh ag deireadh na seachtaine agus níor baineadh póta óir an lotto. Beidh €3,100 sa phóta óir don seachtain seo. Bhain na daoine seo leanas €20 an ceann, Mairead & Eamonn Kelly, Johnny McGee Bunbeg, Brid McDevit Braade, Jim O’Donnell Milltown & Hugh Gallgher Narin Rd, Glenties. Bhain Nancy Mc Grory Sheskinsrone €150 agus bhain Siobhan Tracey, Clare Mc Dyer Glenties and Carol Mc Shea. €100 ag an bingo.Congratulations to the following who won on the Club 200 draw. €1000, Eamonn Diver Craghyboyle, €500, Donal Johnson €300, Davy McCarron Crucknageragh €100, Bella Bonner Falmore agus €100, Patrick Bonner (Enda) Gweedore Road.Well done to our minor team tonight defeating Ardara in a really tough contest by 2 points after a strong second half display. Final score was Dungloe / Na Rossa 0-12 Ardara 1-7. Ardara leading at half time by 6 points on a score-line of Dungloe / Na Rossa 0-4 Ardara 1-7. All to play for in the 2nd leg at home but well done on tonight’s performance especially in the 2nd half. Maith sibh.Dungloe U10’s – We have been invited by Sean MacCumhaill’s, Ballybofey to play in a Blitz on the county pitch this Saturday 4th July. Can you please send a text to Sean O’Donnell (087 181 2161) confirming whether your child is available to attend. MacCumhaill’s have invited 6 teams in total, 3 from the Northern Area and 3 from the Southern Area. It is a great opportunity for the boys and girls to play teams from outside our normal area and also to play on the county pitch. Make sure the children have red socks, white shorts and mouth-guard. There will be no bus. We will be meeting at the Dungloe GAA Pitch entrance at 9.15am. Thank for your co-operation. Under 12 hurling update: As this was the first ever game for this young inexperienced side, they were no match for Letterkenny Gaels who seem to be flying at the moment. Gaels standard of hurling was impressive, and even though the Dungloe team tried their hardest, they soon went well behind. Coming back from the break with no score, it was always going to be hard, especially as Gaels showed no sign of letting up ( I lost count of the amount of goals they scored). But the boys continued to try their best, managing to string a few good passes together, and eventually we managed to score a few points, with Conor Diver hitting a point and scoring a goal, and Philip Noble adding another goal. Karl Magee put in a tremendous effort as always, seeming to pop up where ever the action was. Most teams would have folded and given up, but these young lads refused to give in, and Eamon and myself are very pleased with them for the effort they gave.Senior and reserve teams in league action at home this Sunday to Glenties, see billboard at pitch for throw-in time.GAA NEWS: DUNGLOE MINORS EARN SUPERB CHAMPIONSHIP WIN AWAY TO ARDARA was last modified: June 30th, 2015 by Mark ForkerShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:dungloeGAANoticesSportlast_img read more

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TESCO GRANTED PERMISSION FOR CONTROVERSIAL LETTERKENNY PETROL STATION

first_imgTesco has been granted planning permission for a controversial petrol station at its Letterkenny store.An Bord Pleanala gave permission for the go-ahead for the Port Road fuel outlet earlier this week.It brings to a head a planning saga which has rumbled on for more than a decade. In recent years local businessmen Eddie Tobin, who has a garage at Port Road, and Paul Sweeney who has a Spar at Ballyraine, have objected to the site going ahead.Permission was granted again last June but the businessmen objected claiming increased traffic congestion and also possible redundancies at their businesses.However, the objections were upheld and brought before An Bord Pleanala for a decision.The planning body granted permission to the supermarket giant for the petrol station but with a number of conditions.    TESCO GRANTED PERMISSION FOR CONTROVERSIAL LETTERKENNY PETROL STATION was last modified: March 7th, 2013 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:letterkennypetrol stationtescolast_img read more

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Presidential Hotline 80% successful

first_img22 February 2012 South Africa’s Presidential Hotline is successfully resolving the majority of calls from citizens with problems or complaints, with the latest figures showing an overall case resolution rate of almost 80 percent. South Africans can dial 17737 (toll-free from a landline) to get through to a call centre at the President’s office with questions or gripes about government service delivery. According to the Presidency, citizens use the hotline to raise issues relating to employment, housing, the law, social services, citizenship, electricity, education, health and basic services. Call agents to be increased “Since the 31st of January 2012, the hotline logged a total number of 122 589 calls nationwide, with the overall case resolution rate standing at 79.89%,” the Presidency said in a statement this week. “This is a major improvement since 2009, when the resolution rate was at 39%.” It takes on average 67 working days for a matter recorded with the hotline to be resolved. “However, there are queries which require immediate responses, such as requests for information on government services.” The number of call agents working on the hotline will be increased from 20 to 30 in June, allowing for two shifts a day of 15 agents per shift.Hotline information put to good use The Presidency attributed the hotline’s success to better coordination at senior management level in government, with hotline responsiveness reports now a regular item on the agenda of Forum of South African Directors-General – and a periodic item on the Cabinet’s agenda. The Department for Performance Monitoring and Evaluation was now using the hotline to inform its “unannounced Front Line Service Delivery Monitoring visits”, the Presidency said, and had begun to engage with departments and municipalities that were often targeted by hotline complaints. “We are gradually … living up to President Jacob Zuma’s promise that citizens will have a platform to communicate with government and get the assistance they deserve,” said Minister in the Presidency Collins Chabane. The hotline “provides us with good data on which areas need immediate attention, and we will respond,” Chabane added.Two success stories The Presidency cited two examples of successful direct responses by the hotline, one in which divorce attorney Thembisile Dlamini complained about delays caused by constant loss of files at the Central Divorce Court in Johannesburg. The case was referred to the Department of Justice and Constitutional Development, which intervened immediately. “On investigation, it was established that the file had been transferred to Vereeniging. The department had the file delivered to the attorney’s office, and the attorney was able to proceed with the case.” The second case involved Ms Thandi Joyce Toso, who had gone to the Department of Labour’s offices in Gauteng to find out why she was not getting the money due to her after her husband’s death, only to be told that her late husband’s information did not appear on the system. “On investigation, it appeared that the deceased husband was also married traditionally and had another wife. An investigator from the Unemployment Insurance Fund investigated the matter further with the assistance of the Department of Labour head office, and after the correct documents were submitted at the provincial Department of Labour office, the claim was paid out … in full.” SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

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1913 Land Act: images of loss

first_imgKasianyane Maine, ‘Ou Kas’ as he was affectionately and respectfully known, takes his cattle out to graze in the early morning at Ledig, near Sun City. 1980. (Image: David Goldblatt) Lesego Makganye on part of the land used for crops, Braklaagte, North West. Braklaagte is a community near Zeerust that was resisting incorporation into the Bophuthatswana bantustan. 1986.(Image: Gille de Vlieg)MEDIA CONTACTS• Leigh BlanckenbergEducation Curator, Wits Art Museum+27 11 717 1378RELATED ARTICLES• South Africa looks back 100 years• The history of South Africa• Millions vote in record SA electionLucille DavieIn 1913 law-abiding people were dispossessed of their only means of earning a living: land. The Natives Land Act of 1913 forced millions of black South Africans from productive farms across the country, when their cattle, their homes, their crops and their possessions, were taken from them.This year marks 100 years since the act was passed. The Wits Art Museum or WAM in Johannesburg, Gauteng, is holding a photographic exhibition entitled Umhlaba 1913-2003: commemorating the 1913 Land Act, on until 10 November. Umhlaba means “the land” in Zulu.Photographers exhibiting include some of the country’s finest: David Goldblatt, Paul Weinberg, Santu Mofokeng, Peter Magubane, and Ernest Cole. Work by more than 30 photographers brings the struggles over land, child labour and forced removals poignantly alive in stark shades of black and white.“The 100-year commemoration of the Land Act provides an unparalleled opportunity to experience the stories of land in South Africa in ways that have not been told before,” reads a press statement from WAM.The mostly black and white photographs tell a graphic story – of people loading up their possessions on carts and wagons, harnessing their cattle, sheep and horses, and moving off land that several generations had farmed.Around 7% of land was then relegated to black people, spread along the eastern coastal area, from East London in the Eastern Cape province, upwards, to the border with Mozambique, and spots of land in the Limpopo and North West provinces.Prior to the act, most of these black farmers were tenants on white farms, ploughing a portion of land given to them, and giving up to 50% of the harvest to the landlord, to pay for their tenancy. Now the act prohibited them from hiring or buying land. The landlord-tenant relationship was deemed a criminal offence, for which farmers could be fined £100, a considerable sum in those days. The black tenants would be then given a stark option: become the farmer’s paid servants, or leave the farm.Native Life in South AfricaSol Plaatje, in his 1916 book, Native Life in South Africa, before and since the European War and the Boer Rebellion, describes the disruption to people’s lives after the act was passed. Plaatje, born in the Free State province in 1874, was a journalist and writer, and one of the co-founders of the African National Congress in 1912. He could speak six African languages, in addition to English, Dutch and German, and translated two of Shakespeare’s plays into Setswana. He wrote a novel, entitled Mhudi, and published books of Tswana folktales and proverbs.Plaatje writes that the law “makes it illegal for natives to live on farms except as servants in the employ of Europeans”. It didn’t end there. Black people were also not allowed to live in a municipal area or own property in urban areas. “He can only live in town as a servant in the employ of a European.”Europeans were considered to be any white person, originally settlers from Europe. The act in effect reduced blacks’ land ownership to just 7%, in an area they had settled some 1 500 years before. The pastoral Khoi and hunter/gatherer Bushmen, the first people of South Africa, dating back some 40 000 years, were the first to be squeezed off their land by the early colonists, becoming servants to them, or worse, being shot and killed like game. Europeans colonised the country from 1652, starting with the Hollander Jan van Riebeeck establishing a refreshment station for ships travelling to the east at Cape Town.By the late 1700s the first trekboers, or Dutch farmers, started moving beyond the colony borders, into the Eastern Cape and the Free State. By the 1830s they had moved with their cattle into the Transvaal, now Gauteng province, and KwaZulu-Natal. By 1850 the Boers had demarcated the north-east of the country for themselves, forcing blacks into “native reserves”, smaller and smaller portions of the land. Others were allowed to keep smallholdings on a white farmer’s land, paying 50% of their crops over to the landlord.Over the next 150 years blacks were forced, through poll and hut taxes, to leave the land and become servants and labourers. When gold was discovered in Johannesburg in 1886 thousands of labourers were required, and thousands of displaced blacks had no choice but to look to the mines for paying work, cementing the socially destructive migratory labour system.Hearing and collecting storiesPlaatje spent several months travelling around on a bicycle, hearing and collecting stories from those newly evicted off the land after the act came into effect. He recounts a case where a young couple, with a sick baby, was forced off the land. They hitched up their wagon and after two nights on the road, their baby died. Having no land to bury the child, the only place where they were legitimate was the public road. They didn’t have a choice.“This young wandering family decided to dig a grave under cover of the darkness of that night, when no one was looking, and in that crude manner the dead child was interred – and interred amid fear and trembling, as well as the throbs of a torturing anguish, in a stolen grave, lest the proprietor of the spot, or any of his servants, should surprise them in the act.”Plaatje tells of a widow with her two teenage children and a toddler. When the law was passed, she was hopeful, being a widow, that she would be allowed to stay. She hoped that the “landlord would propose reasonable terms for her; but instead, his proposal was that she should dispose of her stock and indenture her children to him. This sinister proposal makes it evident that farmers not only expect natives to render them free labour, but they actually wish the natives to breed slaves for them.”The widow, Maria, could not comply with these demands, so she was told to leave. Her thatched cottage was set alight, and with her clothes on her head, her three-year-old on her back, the family left the farm, driving their cows before them, the children weeping bitterly. Plaatje didn’t know what happened to them.There were exceptions to the rule. Plaatje found on his travels that some white farmers were astonished at the cruelty of the new law. These farmers continued to accept blacks as tenants on their land, in defiance of the law.“What has suddenly happened?” one of these landlords asked. ‘We were living so nicely with your people, and why should the law unsettle them in this manner?’”But these farmers were under pressure from their racist neighbours, who would report them to the authorities, and they would then be forced to abide by the law. The hope of finding a place to stay on a sympathetic farmer’s land, even temporarily, was often squashed when the farmer was not permitted to take them in, for fear of being reported.There was resistance to the new law. Women in the Orange Free State (now the Free State) marched on the mayor’s offices in the capital Bloemfontein, now Mangaung. Their pleas were rejected and they were thrown into prison, in deplorable conditions.Plaatje went to England in 1913 to protest against the law. He went again in 1919, after World War 2, but he never succeeded in having it abolished or changed in any way.Novelist Bessie Head wrote in 1982: “The 1913 Act created a floating landless proletariat whose labour could be manipulated at will, and ensured that ownership of the land had finally passed into the hands of the ruling white race. On it rest the pass laws, the migratory labour system, influx control and a thousand other evils that affect the lives of black people in South Africa today.”Tenancy and sharecroppingAlthough the 1913 act outlawed tenancy and sharecropping, both continued on a smaller scale for several decades, and black farmers continued to produce surpluses for the market. But by the 1930s white farmers, with assistance from the government, started buying tractors. It was the final nail in the coffin for black farmers, who still relied on the ox-drawn plough. They headed for the towns and cities, to work for poverty wages.In 1936 the Native Trust and Land Act extended the 7% black ownership to 13%, but this made no difference – the land set aside for blacks was simply not enough.After 1948, when the National Party came into power, apartheid was formalised and more racist measures were introduced, measures that were used to further separate blacks from their land – separating them from amenities, in schools, universities, and residential areas; disallowing blacks from white areas; removing blacks from so-called “black spots” into the reserves; and most devastating, forcing all blacks to carry passes. Of course, passes were not new – blacks had been forced to carry permits of some form for decades.The Surplus People Project reported in 1985 that between 1962 and 1980 around 3,5-million people had been uprooted and relocated. In the cities people were moved from inner city areas to townships on the edges.Dispossession continuedThe exhibition demonstrates that the dispossession continued for decades, right into the 1980s.There’s the story of Ou Kas Maine, documented by Goldblatt. He was a sharecropper who managed to evade the act’s restrictions through arrangements with a number of white and black farm owners. He was born around 1894, and died in his 90s. He told Goldblatt in Afrikaans: “Die saad is myne, die skare is myne . . . die span is myne, alles is myne. Die grond is syne.” Translated this means: “The seed is mine, the plough-shares are mine . . . the span of oxen is mine, everything is mine. The land is his.”Goldblatt photographed him in 1980 in a resettlement camp in North West province before he died in 1985.Mofokeng says this as a preface to his photographs: “We carry around within us images of tenant families or yokels as we sometimes refer to them. We think we know their plight: low wages, long working hours and inadequate working conditions to mention a few of the less contentious laments. Their life of hardship passes heedlessly away from the glare of television and the print media.”There is a small study in the exhibition on the “swervers” or trek folk, coloureds (people of mixed race) who still travel around the Karoo on donkey carts, all their possessions in the cart with them. They do odd shearing jobs, but live on the edge of society, sleeping in the veld, dispossessed of their land in the distant past.Then there’s Fietas, an area just west of the Johannesburg city centre settled from the turn of the century by Malay and coloured people. It wasn’t long before Chinese, Africans and Indians settled in the vibrant suburb. Fourteenth Street became the shopping mecca of the town, with people coming from Pretoria to do their shopping there. But that was its downfall – Fietas was too successful and was rezoned, under the Group Areas Act, as a white area, and from 1964 to 1978 the people of Fietas were moved out. Homes and shops were demolished, but like a similar area in Cape Town, District Six, it has been a wasteland for decades, with only a few new homes going up.At about the same time, the apartheid government sent in bulldozers to Sophiatown, some 10km north-west of the Joburg city centre. By 1963 all that remained of this vibrant but often violent suburb were a few churches, a school and a house. A new white suburb – Triomf, meaning “triumph” in Afrikaans – grew from the rubble. Eight years ago the suburb – home to poets, writers and singers such as Dolly Rathebe and Dorothy Masuka – was renamed Sophiatown.Restitution of land rightsBlacks were forced to give up more than their land and possessions – they gave up their freedom, to be enslaved for the next 81 years until democracy dawned in 1994.The 1994 Restitution of Land Rights Act was passed to allow those who had had their land taken away with the 1913 act to apply to get their land back. And so the long and difficult process of returning land to those South Africans who had been wronged, began, and continues today.Bushmen and Khoi people, who were the original owners of South Africa, were excluded from the 1994 restitution because they were dispossessed of their land a century or two beforehand. The land issue will probably never be finally resolved.last_img read more

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Fillip for South African health research

first_img9 June 2015Five South African universities, which were previously under-resourced, have received a R30-million boost for health research.The South African Medical Research Council (SAMRC) made the announcement yesterday during the launch of the Research Capacity Development Initiative for Selected South African Universities at the council’s headquarters in Cape Town.The principal investigators of the valued projects at various universities had presented their abstracts and their thoughts about the programme before being awarded by the SAMRC board.Universities benefiting from the initiative are the University of Fort Hare, University of Limpopo, Walter Sisulu University, University of Venda and the University of Zululand. They have provided compelling proposals that are aligned with institutional research strengths and priorities.The proposals cover an array of areas in health research such as HIV, indigenous medicines, cancer, environmental health and non-communicable diseases.The universities will receive clinical or health research funding worth up to R1- million per institution per year for five years. Discussions will soon be under way with a sixth institution for the same amount over five years.SAMRC president Professor Glenda Gray said this initiative followed recognition by the council that some universities in South Africa were not accessing funding from the council.“The council, noting this gap, addressed this anomaly by funding health research that is conducted by researchers at previously under-resourced institutions. This research will be rewarding for science, it is pertinent to the country’s burden of disease and a game changer for research,” she said.Professor Jeffrey Mphahlele, the SAMRC vice-president, thanked the principal investigators for developing research in their own institutions and contributing to science as a whole.“I would like to challenge them further though; I’d like them to be a part of the SAMRC legacy and in the long run see some of these projects graduating and joining the SAMRC extramural research.”Source: SAnews.govlast_img read more

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Science and technology can be answer to Africa’s challenges

first_imgDespite receiving minimal attention from most governments across the world, the science and innovation sectors had the potential to solve numerous perennial problems.Schoolchildren learn science at the Scibono science museum in Newtown. (Image: Brand South Africa)Brand South Africa reporterDespite receiving minimal attention from most governments across the world, the science and innovation sectors had the potential to solve numerous perennial problems, such as water scarcity, Minister Naledi Pandor said at the opening of the inaugural Science Forum South Africa at the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) in Pretoria on 8 December 2015.The forum took place on 8 and 9 December at the CSIR International Convention Centre.“Africa cannot advance without investing in science,” she said, “(and) there are efforts to enhance the status of science and to increase investment in research development and innovation. Unfortunately, science is still at the margins of government attention – seen as less significant than water scarcity, food security and disease burdens. Yet, all of these can be addressed through science.”The forum may not be a platform for resolutions or declarations, said Pandor, the minister of science and technology, but at the end of the event, “delegates should call on their respective governments and institutions to invest more into science and innovation in Africa”.Over 500 delegates from more than 40 African countries, including government representatives, members of civil society and the private sector, as well science academics and students, gathered to discuss and debate the challenges faced by science and technology within the African context and in an ever-evolving technological landscape.The event revolved around three pillar forums, “science talks” as described by the minister, a series of 18 lectures of 30 minutes each delivered by eminent thought leaders aimed at creating a dynamic and lively discussion environment enabling a vibrant exchange of ideas, fostering partnerships and co-operation.These forums focused on topics relevant to the continent, such as science, technology and innovation policy-making in emerging economies, a look at the successes and future of the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) space telescope project, and finding high-tech health solutions for low-income countries.WATCH: how science makes a (prototype) car run on water #SFSA2015 https://t.co/zNNk8vclxa— IOL News (@IOL) December 8, 2015The concurrent exhibition featured several exhibits by government science and technology departments and international technology and research organisations. Included were public outreach activities focusing on science education held at the Pretoria venue and in city centres around the country.The South African Science Diplomacy Awards were part of the forum as a way – according to the vision of the event – to “celebrate partnerships that have made a significant contribution towards making the world a better place”.Pandor said the summit would prove that Africa was seriously engaged in science and technology, and would also show the rest of the world that the continent was growing its capacity for research and innovation.Keynote address by Minister Naledi Pandor to kick off this great event #SFSA2015 #science #SouthAfrica pic.twitter.com/QHoNMuB8a2— Nadine Wubbeling (@NadineWubbeling) Decembe r 8, 2015“Our key motivation is to foster public engagement (in) science and technology, to showcase science in South Africa and to provide a platform for building strong African and global partnerships. We have many more parallel sessions than originally planned; this is because we were overwhelmed by the very enthusiastic response from speakers and institutions,” she said.“We are very pleased at the participation and presence of several international organisations and thank them for their support for the forum. Our primary rationale for this conference resides in our conviction that science, technology and innovation can and must play a central role in achieving sustainable development.”We need to build enough capacity in #Africa; It must be #STEM, STEM, STEM, & girls, girls girls; & of course + boys pic.twitter.com/RcM2grfSf1— Dr Dlamini Zuma (@DlaminiZuma) December 8, 2015AU Commission chairperson Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma delivered the forum’s keynote address and reiterated the call for improved investment in science and technology, saying it was “critical for Africa to wean itself from food imports, which cost the continent dearly”.“Africa has 60% of the world’s unused arable land, which is unique, (but) scandalous that Africa (still needs to) import $80-billion (R1.2-trillion) worth of food every year,” Dlamini-Zuma said.#SFSA2015 AU Commission Chairperson Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma now addressing #ScienceForum @AfriNewsAgency pic.twitter.com/cA9zIHVWYI— Jonisayi W. Maromo (@Jonisayi) December 8, 2015She added that science and technology research, and the practical application of that research, were all critical to improve agriculture, farming and processing practices and understanding things such as climate patterns and geology.Dlamini-Zuma argued that young people should be at the centre of this drive for new innovation and inspiring new ways of industrialisation. This required better investment in science and technology education. “Young people are our biggest assets; not investing in them and their education is a big liability,” she said.Can’t get enough of the Science Forum? Watch how young women are changing the world #IOL @IOL #SFSA2015: https://t.co/8X8KZzF9Sp— MojoIOL (@mojoIOL) December 10, 2015Women, especially, needed to be the focus of the African science and innovation drive, Dlamini-Zuma said. “Women should be involved: not only because it is their right, but it is also an economic imperative. It makes sense that women should be involved. Companies that have women at their top echelons are more competitive than those that do not have,” said Dlamini-Zuma.The only way Africa could effectively modernise and industrialise was by adding value to its natural and mineral resources, she concluded, adding: “All that needs science. Science can also be an effective job creator.”Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.last_img read more

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